03-30-2012, 07:34 AM
#1
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 03-30-2012, 07:40 AM
#2
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Strangely, the 1970's were also the era when the best DE blades were being produced.

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 03-30-2012, 07:50 AM
#3
  • Leon
  • Active Member
  • Porto, Portugal
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"The 1970s - when the multiblade evil began...."

... and also the beginning of the end of traditional shaving.

The shaving brushes sales started to diminish.

The straight razor production also started to slow down.


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 03-30-2012, 07:58 AM
#4
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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It's a real shame. When you compare 70's double edges with these multiblades, the multiblades just look so cheap. Thin, weak plastic handle with no aesthetic quality. Just looks some another cheap, American disposable product...

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 03-30-2012, 08:40 AM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I loved the 50's, 60's, 80's, 90's, and so for the 20's. But I do everything in my power to forget the decade of the 70's. It was just a bad 10-year period in my life.

Now I know who to blame it on, Gillette. Smile

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 03-30-2012, 08:50 AM
#6
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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On the other hand, the 70's were also when Songwind started, so it wasn't all bad. Wink

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 03-30-2012, 10:46 AM
#7
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The 70's weren't bad. Brush and soap were on there way out in the 50's. By the 70's brush and soap were something grandpa used. The Atra was a great little razor and really unique for it's time. It was the first big change in shaving since the turn of the century. It really was a game changer. Almost every male in my family switched.

I don't like carts, don't use them, but I will admit they are nice shavers and had a huge impact on male grooming.

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 03-30-2012, 12:33 PM
#8
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(03-30-2012, 07:40 AM)bullgoose Wrote: Strangely, the 1970's were also the era when the best DE blades were being produced.

And also the Gillette Super Adjustable razors, which have received high praise from many wetshavers. Aaaargh! If only I had known in the 1970s what I know now I would have bought a Super Adjustable instead of a Trac II.

The Trac II is the only passably good cartridge razor in my experience, but not nearly as good as a safety razor. One reason is that there are a limited number of cartridge types available - usually Gillette and the store brand (often ASR made). Can you imagine what it would be like if there were only two double edge blade types available?

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 03-30-2012, 01:16 PM
#9
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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Now in 2012, we are on the forefront of the resurgent of Traditional Wet Shaving

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 03-30-2012, 01:21 PM
#10
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For us the 1970s were actually very good trading years for Simpson shaving brushes, especially with our own UK sales.

Gary

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 03-30-2012, 02:17 PM
#11
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Trac II is where I was for many years, and then I got back to blades 13 months ago. Hmm, '70s huh? It didn't seem that long to this old fart! I probably hung on to something other for a long time before I had to swap over. Typical for me.

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 03-30-2012, 04:40 PM
#12
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Yikes! Sends shivers down, up and all around my cheeks!!
However, the 70's were a good few years for other things.

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 03-30-2012, 06:25 PM
#13
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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Spmebody told me that the 70s blades (the twin ones) were more sharp and long lasting than the actual multi blade cartridges.It seems than Gillette and Wilkinson discovered during theend of the 80s earlier 90s than a multi blade cartridge shouldnt last you more than 10 shaves...and now,I can honestly say,than any of the Gillette multi blade razors I have tried last me more than 4/5 shaves,sometimes even 3 shaves like the Fusion Pro Glyde!!!The Wilkinson are around 8 or 9 shaves,but just with some models,like the Quattro Titanium and the FX Performer Diamond (no longer being in production).

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 03-30-2012, 09:02 PM
#14
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(03-30-2012, 06:25 PM)Teiste Wrote: Spmebody told me that the 70s blades (the twin ones) were more sharp and long lasting than the actual multi blade cartridges.

I don't know if that is true or not. I think the biggest negative was that carts did not get along with the current foams and lathering products at the time. Clogging and cleaning was a big issue and I think it still is today. The introduction of low stearic acid foams, gels and people adapting to thinner lathering methods helped.

I guess I don't see carts as bad, except from an environmental standpoint. That is why I never switched. They do work and work well. Millions of shavers, with years of DE and straight experience, switched fairly quickly at that time. They all weren't newbies who did not know how to shave and all the alternatives were still available at the time.

I have tried them a handful of times and they do give awesome results with fewer passes. It just feels wasteful and somehow incomplete.

The worst time was the late 80's. Carts were dominant and DE products were scarcer then hen's teeth and nothing new was being marketed or introduced. Williams became my best friend. It will always have a place in my den because it was always there even in the dark times. You can't forget a friend like that.

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 03-31-2012, 03:42 AM
#15
  • Dave
  • Moderator Emeritus
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I'd like to try an Atra or Trac II just to see how they shave, but I can't find a handle for under $30 online. I saw one at an antique shop a couple of weeks ago for $20

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 03-31-2012, 08:00 AM
#16
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(03-31-2012, 03:42 AM)itsmedave Wrote: I'd like to try an Atra or Trac II just to see how they shave, but I can't find a handle for under $30 online. I saw one at an antique shop a couple of weeks ago for $20

Dave, look on Ebay. From time to time I see them going for under $20 with blades. The Bump Fighter razor is also an option and I've seen it at Wal-Mart for $5, and it takes the inexpensive Wilkinson Atra/Trac-II carts that they also sell.

Clayton

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 03-31-2012, 08:15 AM
#17
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I have a number of wonderful memories from the 70's however few of them center around any shaving products. I remember leaving the brush and soap for this new shaving cream on the market called "edge". Thought it would be a time saver for the morning routine. Finally came back to traditional wet shaving and my senses years later.

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 04-08-2012, 06:29 PM
#18
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I learned to shave with a TracII style razor...probably a disposable to boot, about 20 years ago.

Strange thing was, when pivoting head razors were the norm, I just couldn't stand them. I was always much more comfortable using a fixed head cartridge, and anything with more than 2 blades tore me up. The only time I tried a mach 3 or quattro was when they came in the mail for free.

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 04-09-2012, 05:44 AM
#19
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(03-30-2012, 07:40 AM)bullgoose Wrote: Strangely, the 1970's were also the era when the best DE blades were being produced.

Well, maybe they're part and parcel. The DE manufacturers (Personna is what comes to mind, especially with the 74s) probably needed to up their game to compete. Its comparable to the movie industry and TV; once TVs became widespread, movies went to color, widescreen, superwidescreen, 3-D, etc. to entice viewers. Then in the 80's with the VCR, movies went to THX sound, stadium seating, etc., then again in the 00's with Blu-Rays, they went to IMAX, 3D (again).

(03-31-2012, 08:00 AM)chevyguy Wrote: Dave, look on Ebay. From time to time I see them going for under $20 with blades. The Bump Fighter razor is also an option and I've seen it at Wal-Mart for $5, and it takes the inexpensive Wilkinson Atra/Trac-II carts that they also sell.

Clayton

Yeah, I got a cheap TracII style handle on eBay, from either India, or somewhere else in SE Asia, where they still make them (and probably don't worry too much about whatever trademarks Gillette has, if they do!). I think it was about $10 with two 5 packs of cartridges. They were cheap plastic, but I keep them at work just in case.

Also, you could try that Dollar Shave Club. I'm going to give it a shot to see how well it works. Its $3/mo, so if it does work, its one less coffee a month.

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 04-10-2012, 10:26 PM
#20
  • kav
  • Senior Member
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I grew up in what many people consider the Mecca of car culture,Southern California.
I'm sure everyone has heard the term 'Dead as a buggy whip.'
My equestrian background exposed me to the rarified circles of driving and carriage collecting. I never did much; owned two retired Hackney showponies and wilform cart and I was invited to drive everything up to a 6 in hand stagecoach because I am blessed by talent and training a very good 'hand.'
I was visiting a carriage collection and the owner opened a cabinet just for whips. One was british blackthorn,twisted from a parasitic vine with hand braided kangaroo leather and silver fittings. the Londan maker's tag was still attached: 1500 poundsShok My one whip set me back $150
We have some great product in spite of reformulations and brands going out of business.
It's the damned blade situation that is holding a full rennaissance back.P&G knows it too.

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