02-09-2013, 06:13 PM
#1
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Yes, I have owned over 5000 blades at one time. But after seeing several scientific and industrial vendors selling all sorts of made DE and SE blades (including injectors), I have realized that there are many applications out there for such sharp metal: from laboratories to kitchens.

Even with P&G making headway in third world countries to purge the low-profit DE razor, I doubt we will encounter a "Shaveapocalypse" when the supply of razor blades disappears.

What do you think?

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 02-09-2013, 06:19 PM
#2
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I use a straight razor, so I'll be good. It's the soap & brushes I worry about.

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 02-09-2013, 06:21 PM
#3
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Well, I have survived a sexapocalypse, so if this happens I will survive it to.

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 02-09-2013, 06:31 PM
#4
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(02-09-2013, 06:21 PM)Johnny Wrote: Well, I have survived a sexapocalypse, so if this happens I will survive it to.

Biggrin

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 02-09-2013, 07:40 PM
#5
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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The problem with shaving expendables like blades and soaps/creams is that a favored product can suddenly disappear from the market or be changed for the worse. It is for this reason that I have stockpiled favorites.

With artisan soapmakers now offering outstanding products, I see them as the hope for the future of traditional wetshaving. Artisans can't make blades, however, so I would be more worried about these. Then again, there are so many different blades currently in production, and I can use most of them fairly comfortably, that I don't see blades disappearing from the market altogether anytime soon.

- Murray

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 02-09-2013, 07:42 PM
#6
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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This is exactly the reason I am doing a full blade testing for some of the less expensive brands. I plan on finding the best performer for me and stockpiling throughout the next couple years.

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 02-09-2013, 08:43 PM
#7
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+1 what Murray wrote in the first paragraph.

I'm pickier about blades though. I have favorites that I have enough of.

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 02-09-2013, 10:04 PM
#8
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(02-09-2013, 07:40 PM)CMur12 Wrote: The problem with shaving expendables like blades and soaps/creams is that a favored product can suddenly disappear from the market or be changed for the worse. It is for this reason that I have stockpiled favorites.

With artisan soapmakers now offering outstanding products, I see them as the hope for the future of traditional wetshaving. Artisans can't make blades, however, so I would be more worried about these. Then again, there are so many different blades currently in production, and I can use most of them fairly comfortably, that I don't see blades disappearing from the market altogether anytime soon.

- Murray

There are some artisans who make straight razors. If worse comes to worst, if you're willing to learn, you can still get a great shave that way. Once I'm out of school, I plan to learn to shave with a straight. It's just that right now I don't have the time to maintain one.

But you're right, I think: blades are not going to be disappearing from the market anytime soon.

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 02-09-2013, 10:14 PM
#9
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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I've always thought the Shaveapocolypse an illusion because for the 6 years I've been wetshaving I've seen nothing but a steady expansion of the availablility of wetshaving goods across the board. As one vendor said,wetshaving is now an industry, so with its growth, particularly among Americans and Europeans why the fear of scarcity.

I've always thought that finding wetshaving for many is finding something you really love. It becomes a jealous love , you want more and more of the love so you buy more and more shaving stuff. Since the love is to good to be true you're always paranoid about the love leaving you , blades etc. dissappearing, so the resort to hoarding . For many shaving is a love one does not want to let go , therefore the fear that the love may not last does feel like it would be the end of the world , shaveapocolypse.

So Shaveapocolypse may not be anything really objective just fear , insecurity among forum goers with a mutual love of the hobby.

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 02-09-2013, 10:23 PM
#10
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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(02-09-2013, 08:43 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: +1 what Murray wrote in the first paragraph.

I'm pickier about blades though. I have favorites that I have enough of.

Brian, I forgot to mention that I have a cache of favorite blades of current, recent, and vintage production that I could never hope to use up! Cool

- Murray

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 02-09-2013, 11:30 PM
#11
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Yeah, me too, except for the vintage.

I used the horror show called cartridges for so long I never intend to go back. I've simply had my fill of them and those wasted years.

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 02-10-2013, 01:51 AM
#12
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i still fear that the better blades will disappear. do someone still develop a great de blade with the aim to be sharper and smoother and more long lasting than ever?

if i optimistically live and are able to shave for 50 years more - till i turn 90 - and shave 3 times a week and use a polsilver that will last for 6 good shaves - that will be only 1300 blades.

question: how do you folks store 1000s of blades for decades to prevent rust. airy & dry closet with silica beads?

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 02-10-2013, 02:27 AM
#13
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Legend speaks of a time where the traditional wet shaver was hunted to the brink of extinction. The mighty and powerful Gillette Dynasty waged war on the wet shaver with a new weapon that was destined to change the shaving world forever, the cartridge razor. Forged in secret this new weapon would give the Gillette Dynasty the power to rule the shaving world for generations to come. The choice was simple, convert or be eliminated. Resistance was strong at first, but quickly gave way to the power of the cartridge razor. As the masses were converted, traditional shaving supplies were vanquished from the land. Small pockets of resistance built up to salvage all they could of the old ways and worked to pass this tradition on in hopes that one day traditional wet shaving would once again rise up and fight. Years became decades and there didn't seem to be any end to the ruthless rule of the Gillette Dynasty. Cartridge razors became the way; first 1 blade, then 2, then 3, then 5, was there no end in sight? Suddenly there was a shift in the paradigm; slowly those small pockets of resistance began to grow, more and more people began to reject the cartridge razor and began to seek out the truth, they yearned for a better way, they yearned for the old ways. We were now in the digital age, underground chatter began to emerge on forums dedicated to bringing back the traditional ways of shaving, e-commerce sites sprung up to feed this growing demand for traditional wet shaving supplies, and while the Gillette Dynasty remained powerful and continued to make people beholden to its cartridge razors, for the first time in a long time they have heard the voices of dissent.

We have merely begun, we are on the front lines of a shaving revolution and as such fuel the demand for traditional shaving supplies. The Gillette Dynasty will continue to turn its wheels of darkness, but it us that will bring the light to the masses. Only we can prevent the Shavepocalypse.

#nomorecoffee@night Biggrin

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 02-10-2013, 10:48 AM
#14
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Doesn't AoS have a stake in ensuring continued production of blades?

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 02-10-2013, 10:53 AM
#15
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Points in this thread regarding aspects other than blades are well-taken. Tom, please do keep drinking coffee at night and dazzling us with your posts!

Lee, P&G has more skin in the cartridge market game so I think they can cannibalize the AOS segment if better for business at any time.

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 02-10-2013, 11:02 AM
#16
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@Tom,
I understand that the carts are P&G's bread & butter, but I'm still having trouble wrapping my head around the notion that DE blades will disappear considering the resurgence and continued popularity of the DE razor.

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 02-10-2013, 11:45 AM
#17
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I think Gillette/ P&G recognize that there is a niche market for DE blades in the US and there are some parts of the world where DE blades are still the norm, but with products like the Guard, they are finding ways to convert the masses to the cartridge razor. Considering how many people shave, I would say that we are probably a relatively small percentage, granted that percentage is growing. AOS is a boutique store that serves a relative small portion of the shaving population and has a very specific demographic of customer. If you ever go into an AOS store, the DE razors and what I can only assume are NOT shave ready straights are in the background behind things like vibrating Fusion razor handles and vibrating brushes- they are basically trying to sell luxury shaving with a cartridge razor. There might come a time where it doesn't make sense for P&G's business model to keep making DE blades, but that doesn't mean that they will cease to exist- other companies will step in to fill the void, i.e. ASR- what you will probably see is a some brands fall off, others come in, and an overall decrease in the number of different types of blades out there.

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 02-10-2013, 12:19 PM
#18
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Thankfully p&g and Gillette don't hold a monopoly in the blade market. If they do decide they want to get out of the DE market and shut their Indian and Russian factories I'm sure others like Lord and Personna would be more than happy to step in and pick up the slack. Heck Dorco seems happy to make any inroads they can into the razor market right now. Some people may lose their favorite brands, but then the fun of experimenting and finding a new favorite starts all over again.

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 02-10-2013, 01:25 PM
#19
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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(02-10-2013, 11:45 AM)BladeDE40 Wrote: I think Gillette/ P&G recognize that there is a niche market for DE blades in the US and there are some parts of the world where DE blades are still the norm, but with products like the Guard, they are finding ways to convert the masses to the cartridge razor. Considering how many people shave, I would say that we are probably a relatively small percentage, granted that percentage is growing. AOS is a boutique store that serves a relative small portion of the shaving population and has a very specific demographic of customer. If you ever go into an AOS store, the DE razors and what I can only assume are NOT shave ready straights are in the background behind things like vibrating Fusion razor handles and vibrating brushes- they are basically trying to sell luxury shaving with a cartridge razor. There might come a time where it doesn't make sense for P&G's business model to keep making DE blades, but that doesn't mean that they will cease to exist- other companies will step in to fill the void, i.e. ASR- what you will probably see is a some brands fall off, others come in, and an overall decrease in the number of different types of blades out there.

Whats the origin of the whole theory of the Shaveapocolypse.Has the forum guy who came up with it based his idea on real study of global trends in blade production ,demographics of users in developing nations, a real knowledge of Gillette company strategies. The theory isn't based on anything except it seems fear of the St.Petersburg plant closings and who knows anything conclusive about that.

I am not for ignorance and wonder on issues but I haven't seen any thing but dire prognostications on the fate of the razor blade and it seems this is based on forum tittle tattle.

Can the Guard revolutionize shaving in China, India, Africa to such an extent that its game changer? I was in Morocco and just didn't see it. In supermarkets there Gillette Cart systems sit side by side with tradional shaving goods but although men look interested in them they are still to pricey. I saw Gillettes for $4 but your daily wage might be $5. There you can still go to the corner store and buy one razor blade at a time or a single disposable for a quarter.My young brother in law uses a disposable and bath soap and gets outstanding shaves, lol, he looks like film star.

You know as I do that part of modern consumerism is whats called fabricating the consumer and creating wants. Gillette has been so good at this with razors that its almost like we were all under mind control with regard to using carts. We go to wetshaving and we feel stupid , how could we have been fooled like that. Many of us can't forgive Gillette for than so tend to see them as a omnipotent evil, when they are razor/blade hustlers whose business strategies may or may not work .

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 02-10-2013, 01:31 PM
#20
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(02-10-2013, 11:45 AM)BladeDE40 Wrote: what you will probably see is a some brands fall off, others come in, and an overall decrease in the number of different types of blades out there.

I suppose I can see that, but as long as there is a customer base, someone will fill it.

So, what you're really saying is not so much a shavepocalypse, but a narrowing of DE blade options (and only DE blade options).

DE blades are the most likely to experience consolidation because there is no feasible way to micro manufacture them.

So, I suppose all you guys should just switch to straight razors. Biggrin

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