02-10-2013, 07:48 AM
#1
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A 13/16 Reynolds that I cleaned up the blade and duplicated the original wedgeless scales in new Horn.

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

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 02-10-2013, 08:30 AM
#2
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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Whoa ! what a cleaver ! cleaned up nicely, well done ! such a treat to see the results of your work. Thanks for the pic !

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 02-10-2013, 08:47 AM
#3
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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very nice! I like the gradient from light to dark on this one, and that one extra streak of darkness shooting up towards te pivot pin on the front add a nice bit of character (as if it really needed more lol)

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 02-10-2013, 01:30 PM
#4
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Hi Mark

Beautiful work on the blade restoration.

That horn material for the scales is stunning and I love how the tang and monkey tail are viewable through the horn...

Could you please share a photo that shows the wedge-less scale detail?

Take care, Mike

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 02-10-2013, 02:38 PM
#5
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
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Gentlemen,
Those Frederick Reynolds razors are quite handsome. I had several in my collection and, to my regret, sold them. Now I scratch my head why. I should have kept at least a couple. Anyway, mycarver, your is quite striking. Good show.

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 02-11-2013, 07:15 AM
#6
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I've received several emails asking if it's for sale. I have several of these in my collection as well ,but none are for sale. I've heard of buyers remorse,, but I think I'd have sellers remorse.
Heard too many sad tales of " Why did I sell it" ranging from cars, to razors to any number of things.

Here are a few shots of the wedgeless scales.
Things to keep in mind:
The pads that will serve as half the wedge
must be angled slightly towards the tail end to provide the splay of the scales at the same time they have to remain parallel to the hinge end of the scales to allow the blade to center properly. If you look at the small edge you can see how the insides of the scales are cut at an angle. Also the section that serves as half the wedge must line up with the opposite side on the top and bottom to have a clean , uniform look without gaps or misalignment.

Two, the insides of the scales are cut deeper along the upper edge and shallower along the bottom edge. Doesn't really have to,but I did it as this is how the originals were. This creates a wedge opening for the blade and is a nice detail, though many may not notice it.
Three, the scales should still be tapered along their length matching the profiles of the originals which you can easily check with a vernier caliper.

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

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 02-11-2013, 08:15 AM
#7
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(02-11-2013, 07:15 AM)mycarver Wrote: Here are a few shots of the wedgeless scales.
Things to keep in min...

Hi Mark

Thank you for the additional photos Smile

And thank you for the additional "detail" information, has opened my eyes and made me aware there's a lot! of little details that go into making a well made (and beautiful looking) set of scales...

Take care, Mike

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 02-17-2013, 07:32 PM
#8
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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The razors are great! The how-to and information are the frosting on the cake!
~Rcihard

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