02-28-2013, 09:01 PM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Just wanted to make sure you knew I wasn't talking about fish Smile

I have just realised my kitchen scales are a fair bit out. That's ok for cooking, but measuring your razor? Not great.

I decided to test them by measuring some standard Australian coin weights, and using coins that are newly minted.

I think this would be a good, reliable test if you wanted to check your scales.

I should buy some better scales, therefore, but can't say for sure which ones are best.

Does anyone have an opinion? Recommendation?

No, I don't know any drug dealers, so I won't be asking for their recommendations...

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 02-28-2013, 09:14 PM
#2
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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I've been using this scale for about a year now and love it. It's simple, easy to use, goes up to 11# and is spot on accurate.

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 02-28-2013, 09:15 PM
#3
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You're looking for grain scales. Used for precision weight measurements. Ammo reloading uses these scales.

That said, my $60 Oxo scale is pretty darn accurate to the gram. Not so good for smaller than that though. But, grams are the smallest measurement. I use it as a postal scale which must be accurate to the ounce.

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 02-28-2013, 09:17 PM
#4
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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I have a weight set and typically grab the 100g weight and toss it on once in a while to make sure it's still accurate and it always comes out 100g on the nose.

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 02-28-2013, 09:18 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(02-28-2013, 09:14 PM)Arcadies Wrote: I've been using this scale for about a year now and love it. It's simple, easy to use, goes up to 11# and is spot on accurate.

How do you know they're accurate?

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 02-28-2013, 09:20 PM
#6
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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(02-28-2013, 09:18 PM)Shaun Wrote:
(02-28-2013, 09:14 PM)Arcadies Wrote: I've been using this scale for about a year now and love it. It's simple, easy to use, goes up to 11# and is spot on accurate.

How do you know they're accurate?

See above.

That's odd that my post appeared first.

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 02-28-2013, 10:02 PM
#7
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Shaun, the coins you weighed, were they precious metal? If so are they Troy ounces? (a troy ounce isn't an ounce as most folks know an ounce)

OK, having written that, when it comes to critical things that I need to weigh out for my AS formulas, I use my reloading scale that weighs in grains. I use an online conversion to convert grams to grains. There are 7000 grains to the pound. The problem with a reloading scale is that, mine anyway, it's designed to be set to a weight that needs to be measured repeatedly. It's not really designed to weigh items of differing weights. Mine is actually a balance beam with sliding weights on knife edge/agate bearings, I hate moving the weights when the beam is in place. A digital reloading scale might do what you want.

I use the higher capacity (11#?) OXO scale for what you're thinking of doing. It works fine and is accurate enough at lesser weights. For use as a shipping scale the display pulls out so that it can accept a large carton and one can still see the display.

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 02-28-2013, 10:15 PM
#8
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(02-28-2013, 10:02 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Shaun, the coins you weighed, were they precious metal? If so are they Troy ounces? (a troy ounce isn't an ounce as most folks know an ounce)

OK, having written that, when it comes to critical things that I need to weigh out for my AS formulas, I use my reloading scale that weighs in grains. I use an online conversion to convert grams to grains. There are 7000 grains to the pound. The problem with a reloading scale is that, mine anyway, it's designed to be set to a weight that needs to be measured repeatedly. It's not really designed to weigh items of differing weights. Mine is actually a balance beam with sliding weights on knife edge/agate bearings, I hate moving the weights when the beam is in place. A digital reloading scale might do what you want.

I use the higher capacity (11#?) OXO scale for what you're thinking of doing. It works fine and is accurate enough at lesser weights. For use as a shipping scale the display pulls out so that it can accept a large carton and one can still see the display.

Some are sovereigns, so yes. (British Sov = 7.988g) I any case Australian coins weigh very specific amounts, but lighten as they wear, obviously. They don't vary too much though.

Coins and notes are counted here by weight as well. Seems like it might be risky to weigh notes, but yes, I have seen it done many times now. Pinpoint accurate scales they must have in banks is all I can say. The notes here are plastic, incidentally, but I must say I preferred the paper type or yesteryear.

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 03-01-2013, 06:13 AM
#9
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Reloading scales not all go high enough for all razor weights. I used digital postal scales.

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 03-01-2013, 07:14 AM
#10
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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I read an article in the NYTimes over a year ago that prompted me to purchase a kitchen scale (although all I use it for is weighing razors and using it for postage Biggrin). They listed three scales: the OXO, a Soehnle, and an Ozeri (which I purchased from Amazon for ~$20). All were judged to be accurate. The Ozeri looks identical to the Eatsmart model that Arcadies cites above, and I've been very happy with it.

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 03-01-2013, 02:43 PM
#11
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(03-01-2013, 07:14 AM)greyhawk Wrote: I read an article in the NYTimes over a year ago that prompted me to purchase a kitchen scale (although all I use it for is weighing razors and using it for postage Biggrin). They listed three scales: the OXO, a Soehnle, and an Ozeri (which I purchased from Amazon for ~$20). All were judged to be accurate. The Ozeri looks identical to the Eatsmart model that Arcadies cites above, and I've been very happy with it.

Great. I'll look 'em up! Thanks!

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 03-01-2013, 03:06 PM
#12
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(03-01-2013, 06:13 AM)Johnus Wrote: Reloading scales not all go high enough for all razor weights. I used digital postal scales.

Razors go above 100 grams!?

This scale goes up to 100 grams in .01 gram increments.

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 03-01-2013, 03:19 PM
#13
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(03-01-2013, 03:06 PM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(03-01-2013, 06:13 AM)Johnus Wrote: Reloading scales not all go high enough for all razor weights. I used digital postal scales.

Razors go above 100 grams!?

This scale goes up to 100 grams in .01 gram increments.

Biggrin Nothing on my radar really, but I think there's a UFO handle that goes over 100 grams. "Batter up"!

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 03-01-2013, 03:29 PM
#14
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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.01 gram increments, ha ha! On such a micro-scale you could put different handle weights on the same model down to the grade of knurling.

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 03-01-2013, 05:23 PM
#15
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(03-01-2013, 03:29 PM)Shaun Wrote: .01 gram increments, ha ha! On such a micro-scale you could put different handle weights on the same model down to the grade of knurling.

Yes, highly accurate. A grain is 1/7000 of a pound. Biggrin

But if all you want is +/- 1 gram, then a kitchen scale is what you want. Don't scrimp though. Price is a good, but not 100% accurate, indicator of quality.

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 03-01-2013, 10:58 PM
#16
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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0.5 gram would be reasonable I think. have scales and they are reputable, but using my method with known true weights, they simply aren't measuring accurately. It's disappointing to realise this, bit I'm not going to die in a ditch over it Smile

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 03-02-2013, 12:55 PM
#17
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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I have been using a digital postal scale and its very accurate.

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