03-01-2013, 06:17 PM
#1
User Info
I recently received the CJB disposable blade Kamisori razor. I will be using a Feather Professional blade as I already use these in the Cobra Classic. So I am used to the blade, but not the complete freedom I'm about to have in the angles that I can bring this blade across my face.

So, do you find it best to try & maintain a certain angle? Do you go by "feel"? Blade as flat against the face as possible or angled out a good bit. Do you use different angles for different passes?

Thanks & I also welcome any advice you may have. I think most have seen my routine in one of my videos so if there is anything you'd modify to work better with a straight then please advise.

31 7,912
Reply
 03-01-2013, 06:30 PM
#2
User Info
I haven't used a shavette, but I'd recommend to start as shallow as possible. Almost having the spine touch your face first and move out from there depending on your comfort level.

0 372
Reply
 03-01-2013, 07:29 PM
#3
User Info
Brian, from when i used my Feather Artist Club RG and DX non-folding, i went by feel. i usually maintained an angle somewhat close to a traditional straight, but those darn blades were just too sharp for me. i think you may really enjoy your shaves since you like the Cobra so much. Enjoy.

75 20,883
Reply
 03-01-2013, 08:32 PM
#4
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
(03-01-2013, 06:30 PM)Williams Warrior Wrote: I haven't used a shavette, but I'd recommend to start as shallow as possible. Almost having the spine touch your face first and move out from there depending on your comfort level.

Exactly my goal... The spine almost touching the skin and a REALLY light touch keeping the razor in my fingertips.

33 914
Reply
 03-01-2013, 09:33 PM
#5
User Info
I briefly touch on angles in this post:

http://www.asharperrazor.com/getting-sta...or-shaving

Start shallow and work your way up. Not the other way around. And if it pulls, you have too steep an angle or a dull blade.

9 2,988
Reply
 03-01-2013, 10:05 PM
#6
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
User Info
I also use the same angle as with a straight but like others wrote it's probably best to start with the razor almost against the skin and go from there. Don't grip the handle of the razor, use a very very light grip, that way instead of nicking yourself you will feel the razor move in your hand when it gets stuck.

you might have a look at this video, I know it's a woman they shave but just look at how the razor is handled.

good luck with the shaves! after a few times muscle memory will kick in and you won't have to think about it anymore.


27 1,294
Reply
 03-02-2013, 05:03 AM
#7
User Info
Brian,
You'll do fine if you just remember to only push it as far as you're comfortable. For nearly a month, I only did wtg passes and then slowly introduced xtg passes along the jaw line and the cheek. I do a little agt on the neck with one hand, but not the other.

Don't feel that you "have" to do any sort of pass everywhere you shave. Just let it come as slow or as fast as your muscle memory allows and you'll be getting great shaves soon enough. The first 6 weeks of straight shaving nearly all my shaves were inferior to my DE shaves, but now they're all on a par. Wouldn't yet say they were better, but they're more fun.

Also, as an interesting note, shed less blood learning to straight shave than learning to DE shave.

5 298
Reply
 03-02-2013, 05:27 AM
#8
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
Good info in both of those links. Thank you.

The video shows much more angle than expected, but it looks to be about the same as angle in the cleaver shave. The young lady has an amazingly light grip on the razor.. Would one hold equally light when shaving coarse whiskers rather than fine female facial hair?

33 914
Reply
 03-02-2013, 05:28 AM
#9
User Info
Thanks Oake!

This morning's shave results were a bit better than expected and still quite humbling at the same time. I did confirm that I'm no straight shaving prodigy and that my decision to not become a surgeon was a good one. Tongue

My first pass (WTG) seemed a bit easier than I thought it would be. Initial stumbling block was trying to see around my own arms when around my sideburns/cheek. Jawline and chin were definitely not as close as I normally get on a single pass, but that is definitely an angle issue.

Second pass (XTG) wouldn't have been a consideration if my first pass hadn't gone so well. It didn't take long, however, for me to learn that my hand is not steady enough and comfortable enough wielding an open blade. In an instant, one in which I didn't even think I had the blade touching my skin yet, I had about a 1/4 inch cut on my cheek. I then put the CJB down and finished the rest of the shave with the OCMM. While the OCMM is no beast for me I will say that after maneuvering the open blade around, the OCMM felt like I was shaving with an injector.

I will most likely save my straight expedition for the weekend but I do look forward to continuing to learn this skill. I also will take this razor with me to my next haircut and ask my barber to use this on my neck line instead of his normal injector-blade shavette.

Thanks to all for your advise. I look forward to learning more from you all.

31 7,912
Reply
 03-02-2013, 06:44 AM
#10
User Info
Brian,
My first few weeks I cut myself pretty regularly though the cuts were really shallow. You did the right thing. Do what you're comfortable with, finish off if you need to with another razor and come back to it.
oake

5 298
Reply
 03-02-2013, 06:50 AM
#11
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
User Info
(03-02-2013, 05:27 AM)MikekiM Wrote: The video shows much more angle than expected, but it looks to be about the same as angle in the cleaver shave. The young lady has an amazingly light grip on the razor.. Would one hold equally light when shaving coarse whiskers rather than fine female facial hair?

I have seen several video's with about the same angle, I use a smaller angle for my face and head but when I shave my wife I use a bigger angle. There is a difference between woman's body hair and facial hair in resistance but my grip is about the same. The blade is so sharp that it has no problem, in fact if you put a bit of pressure on it the shave will be no good. You can easily get what they call skin thinning.

27 1,294
Reply
 03-02-2013, 09:09 AM
#12
  • DoubleB
  • Active Member
  • Zeeland, The Netherlands
User Info
+1 on the great advices already given.
When I started with a straight I really watched my angle closely (20 degrees for shavette), but since I've got used to it I just go by feel.
You'll definately notice when your angle is off though.

5 447
Reply
 03-02-2013, 12:37 PM
#13
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
i took the maiden voyage today as well..

I opted for the ProGuard.. I am a chicken.

Aside from a two small weepers, neither of which I actually felt, there was no blood. Alum did reveal two more spots with the slightest burn. Cold water rinse resolved both...pretty much.

Like Brian, I had trouble seeing around my arms and was often tempted to allow my DE muscle memory to take over.

I did try to use both hands. I am right hand dominant and typically shave one handed. Using my left was like being in a house of mirrors.. which way do I move? forward is backward, left is right..

I did two passes, both WTG (sort of) and now, about 45 minutes post shave it feels like a three-plus shave with a SuperSpeed. What's odd is that spots that have stubble are not those I would have expected..

It didn't take much longer even though I was extra careful.

From what I remember of my last adventure with the Feather AC, this non-folding version is much easier to manage.

33 914
Reply
 03-02-2013, 01:15 PM
#14
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
User Info
The Feather blade is sharper than any straight (I believe this is true for any SE of DE blade). The sharpness of the blade makes shavettes easier to use than straights. Angle changes on the straight are required to maximize cutting efficiency of the blade, but not so much for a shavette.

SE/DE blades are so sharp that angle adjustment is not as critical. With a DE the shaving angle is essentially fixed by the DE head. A range of angles from 15 to 30 degrees is normal for a straight, but that kind of change is out of the question with a DE (I haven't shaved with an SE so I don't know if it is equally true for SEs).

I know my opinion is contrary to the majority of straight shavers who consider a shavette a good way to learn shaving with a straight, but my experience leads me to the conclusion that straights are unique. There is no way to learn how to handle a straight except by using a straight. All single blade shaving will be helpful in teaching about prep and using a light touch, but maneuvering a straight has to be learned razor in hand. IMHO.

16 542
Reply
 03-02-2013, 03:09 PM
#15
User Info
(03-02-2013, 05:27 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Good info in both of those links. Thank you.

The video shows much more angle than expected, but it looks to be about the same as angle in the cleaver shave. The young lady has an amazingly light grip on the razor.. Would one hold equally light when shaving coarse whiskers rather than fine female facial hair?

You only need to hold it firmly enough so that you have control over the blade. Just like a DE actually.

(03-02-2013, 01:15 PM)matloffm Wrote: The Feather blade is sharper than any straight (I believe this is true for any SE of DE blade). The sharpness of the blade makes shavettes easier to use than straights. Angle changes on the straight are required to maximize cutting efficiency of the blade, but not so much for a shavette.

SE/DE blades are so sharp that angle adjustment is not as critical. With a DE the shaving angle is essentially fixed by the DE head. A range of angles from 15 to 30 degrees is normal for a straight, but that kind of change is out of the question with a DE (I haven't shaved with an SE so I don't know if it is equally true for SEs).

I know my opinion is contrary to the majority of straight shavers who consider a shavette a good way to learn shaving with a straight, but my experience leads me to the conclusion that straights are unique. There is no way to learn how to handle a straight except by using a straight. All single blade shaving will be helpful in teaching about prep and using a light touch, but maneuvering a straight has to be learned razor in hand. IMHO.

I think most straight razor users agree that a straight is a straight and a shavette is a DE on a stick. Tongue

That said, I think the perception about sharpness has more to do with the coating DE blades have than actual sharpness.

9 2,988
Reply
 03-03-2013, 03:41 AM
#16
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
User Info
(03-02-2013, 01:15 PM)matloffm Wrote: I know my opinion is contrary to the majority of straight shavers who consider a shavette a good way to learn shaving with a straight, but my experience leads me to the conclusion that straights are unique. There is no way to learn how to handle a straight except by using a straight.

I believe the same thing. It was not that difficult to go from straights to the Feather DX and KAI razors but I would not go so far as to say that either is a very good way to learn the other. Each require it's own approach.

27 1,294
Reply
 03-03-2013, 06:02 AM
#17
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
(03-03-2013, 03:41 AM)Snuff Wrote: ....It was not that difficult to go from straights to the Feather DX and KAI razors but I would not go so far as to say that either is a very good way to learn the other. Each require it's own approach.

I am viewing the disposable blade straights as a stepping stone to traditional straights.. I am seeing each as it's own experience. The likelihood that I am able to gear up for maintenance of a straight (or that SWMBO will allow me any additional bathroom real estate) is slight at best.

33 914
Reply
 03-03-2013, 07:28 PM
#18
User Info
The way I figured the best angle was to start with the spine resting on my face. The razor won't cut anything at that point. Then gradually raise the spine slightly until you fell the blade cutting hair. The correct angle has the spine just off the face.

37 2,907
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)