03-02-2013, 03:56 PM
#1
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This here is my first vintage shaving brush restoration. I think it went well, for a first time. I maybe could have set the loft a bit shorter, but overall I am more than happy with the results. A little background, first.

I received this Ever-Ready 100T from my mom. It was my grandpa's (her father), and came in a small tan shaving mug with his nickname on it. The bristles were bent and fairly brittle when I got a hold of it. I decided early on that I wanted to restore it, if possible.

Mom thought it would be a good idea to have it as a decoration, but I know my grandpa would much rather see something put to use than just sitting around as something to look at. His expansive, self-built work bench still in the basement of that house is a testament to this attitude.

I cut the bulk of the hairs out with a knife, and drilled a couple of holes into the knot with a small drill bit. I then started carefully boring holes straight down into the handle with large bits. I ended up having to use a 3/4" bit to get all the knot removed, and after that, the handle sat under the sink until I felt I confident enough to take on the project, which happened a few nights back. I decided on a finest badger knot (extra hair, fan shape) from thegoldennib.com, based on several recommendations. A very popular knot. I chose 22mm, which I wasn't able to measure, but estimated via a nickel. It arrived yesterday, and I went about finishing the project.

[attachment=12833]

My first problem was that the hole wasn't wide enough to fit the knot, so I began to drill and sand to widen the hole. The material I was drilling was plastic, which came off easily enough, but the going was slow. I kept at it until the plastic ring broke and popped out of the handle entirely. This left an almost perfect width to work with, and the knot dropped in without as much as a hair's width of wiggle room.

[attachment=12834]

The next issue to address was the depth. The knot sat so that the top of the plug was level with the very top of the brush, which would obviously result in a flop monster. I went back at it with the drill, and eventually the wood in the brush was gone and I was drilling into a plastic-y material. The handle started loosening a bit at the joint of the red and black pieces, and making a strange sound as the drill chewed through it, so I stopped where I was, which brought the hairs a few mm down into the handle. I probably should have drilled a bit deeper, but fear of ruining the handle and fatigue (I had been working bit by bit for a good few hours now) led me to convince myself to be content with where the knot was.

[attachment=12835]

I roughly sanded the inside of the hole, and the bottom of the knot, to help the epoxy adhere. I started putting some epoxy into the hole—enough to fill the hole from the top of the drill bit, cover the floor of the hole, and just a few mm to come up the side of the knot. I then firmly gripped the knot by the hair, and pushed it into the hole with a little force. I sat and yawned (it was past 11:00pm now), applying pressure for 4-5 minutes, and let the brush sit a few more before taking it upstairs to the bathroom to sit in the cabinet and cure.

[attachment=12836]

When I got home from work and grocery shopping, around 4:00 this afternoon, I went straight upstairs to examine the results. I was afraid I was going to be left with something too floppy to use pleasurably, with the loft as high as it was. I ran some warm water through the bristles for a few seconds, then I shook it out and loaded some Klar Kabinett soap to do a test lather. Now, I'm accustomed only to boar brushes, with plenty of backbone, so the ease of loading with this brush surprised me somewhat. I loaded about half a minute, and palm lathered, massaging the lather back into the brush as I went. I let the lather sit a minute before rinsing it out of the brush.

[attachment=12837]

By this point, I was obviously curious how the brush felt on the face, so I rinsed my face with warm water, wet the brush, and bowl lathered some Top Secret. The lather came on quick and thick. I applied it to my face, and I have to say, it just felt dreamy...

[attachment=12838]

Overall, I call this project a success. It certainly doesn't feel floppy to me now, but of course, I've only played with it a bit at this point. After some usage, I may change my opinion.

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 03-02-2013, 04:02 PM
#2
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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Very nice! I've always liked those red and black 100T's.

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 03-02-2013, 05:07 PM
#3
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It is a great to restore something your grandfather used!

Enjoy the brush!

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 03-02-2013, 07:04 PM
#4
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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Looks good for the first try!

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 03-02-2013, 07:40 PM
#5
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Hi Seth

Nicely! done Thumbsup

What loft height did you end up with?

Take care, Mike

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 03-02-2013, 08:55 PM
#6
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Seth, great looking brush and congratulations!

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 03-02-2013, 08:59 PM
#7
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Sounds and looks like you did a fine job!

The TGN Finest Fan is one absolutely fantastic knot. It's a lather monster that has everything going for it.

From what you wrote, I suspect your grandad would be proud.

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 03-02-2013, 11:37 PM
#8
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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Looks like you did a great job! I like the fact that you didn't go overboard on restoring the handle allowing the history to show through. Enjoy your shaves and let us know your impressions after several uses.

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 03-03-2013, 03:37 PM
#9
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(03-02-2013, 07:40 PM)mikeperry Wrote: Hi Seth

Nicely! done Thumbsup

What loft height did you end up with?

Take care, Mike

The loft is 58mm...
My only regret about the project, really. I probably could have gone deeper in. If there were a way to remove the knot from the handle without destroying either... Oh well, though. Learning experience, I suppose.

I lathered some Tabac this morning. It loaded the soap well, and felt fantastic. Bloom is monstrous though.

(03-02-2013, 11:37 PM)blzrfn Wrote: Looks like you did a great job! I like the fact that you didn't go overboard on restoring the handle allowing the history to show through. Enjoy your shaves and let us know your impressions after several uses.

I didn't want to go into buffing, painting, polishing and all that. I cleaned a film off it, but the wear that was there I wanted to keep. Not that it was destroyed, but a little rough around the edges. I like it.

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 03-03-2013, 07:10 PM
#10
  • TexBilly
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Austin, TX
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Well done, Seth!

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 03-04-2013, 04:52 AM
#11
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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Wonderful restore and a great read too, congratulations Seth!

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 03-04-2013, 11:52 AM
#12
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-03-2013, 03:37 PM)sethleupagus Wrote: The loft is 58mm...
My only regret about the project, really. I probably could have gone deeper in. If there were a way to remove the knot from the handle without destroying either... Oh well, though. Learning experience, I suppose.

Hi Seth

Totally agree, we learn from doing...

I'm in the early stages of re-working four shaving brushes (handles made for me by Rodney Neep), correcting the mistakes I made when installing the knots first time around...

Good luck on your next shaving brush restoration Thumbsup

Take care, Mike

Edit: Fixed smilie.

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