03-03-2013, 01:31 AM
#1
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I always found that my second and third lather were drier compared to the first.

For my first pass, the whole shave is nice and slick

Second lather, I lather my full face and start shaving one side, by the time I reach the other side of my face, my lather would be dry very dry.

I kept thinking my water to lather ratio was off.

Until one day I decided to run the shower and turned off the bathroom fan (ventilation exhaust).

I had such a superior lather. It was slick all throughout.

To test my theory I did this for 4 shaves in a row.

I kept variables constant. Same soap, same brush, same water (distilled), same amount of time soaking, same amount of soap loading (count by seconds - 45 seconds).

Then on the 5th and 6th shave I didn't run the shower and kept the fan on.

By the second shave the lather would dry on my face and no longer be slick.

Its not an industrial grade exhaust fan but its very good quality.

So heres something for those of you with dry lather issues to think about.

Remember if you try it, keep your variables constant. Same soap/cream and brush at least.

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 03-03-2013, 03:31 AM
#2
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Can't help you, no bathroom fan here. But I would be surprised if that's the reason for the lather to dry out.

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 03-03-2013, 11:49 AM
#3
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Very interesting observations. i don't run the shower nor the fan and most days, have great lather. Had never even thought of that variable.

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 03-03-2013, 01:57 PM
#4
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Just rinse your face between passes and leave it wet

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 03-03-2013, 02:36 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I sometimes leave a door open (it's an external door) and there is a noticeable difference. Some soaps dry out a lot more than others though. La Toja does, for sure. Sometimes there is a light breeze, other times not. Naturally, 'atmosphere' would make a difference. I can't have it too steamy though: foggy mirror. One solution to this is to wipe the mirror with tallow-based shaving soap and then wipe it off. Makes a film that doesn't fog up. Hm, this could be a new thread....

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 03-03-2013, 03:01 PM
#6
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Good observation OP! I concur and have mentioned it in the past, though not to dwell on it. I assumed it happened to everyone when their indoor air was dry. Some sections of the country may not experience it as much as the cold(dry) belt of the planet.

I've noticed that my lather dries out for subsequent passes as well, and yes, it's worse in the winter when our home is dry as a bone. I've always blamed the dry air for it in the winter. OK, when it's -10°F outside and super dry because of the temperature (cold air simply cannot hold water vapor) it sucks the moisture out of our homes like blotter paper soaking up water. Heat with wood as we do and it compounds the problem since that ultra dry outdoor air is now being drawn into our home to feed the fire.

I do as others have suggested and wet my face and "rebuilt" the lather. In the winter I don't even test the lather, I just do it.

There may be another cause with certain brushes. Boar hair will soak up water. I allow my boar brushes to soak at most a minute or two, no more. If lather is built then allowed to sit during the first pass, the boar might steal water from the lather. But whether that's a factor or not the 2nd pass lather is always drier for me.

FWIW, even with a synthetic fiber brush the lather is drier, so there's more going on than boar hair soaking up water, I'm just suggesting that boar might be an additional factor.

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 03-03-2013, 08:58 PM
#7
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(03-03-2013, 01:57 PM)SteelTown Wrote: Just rinse your face between passes and leave it wet

Breaks down lather. Makes it watery.

(03-03-2013, 02:36 PM)Shaun Wrote: I sometimes leave a door open (it's an external door) and there is a noticeable difference. Some soaps dry out a lot more than others though. La Toja does, for sure. Sometimes there is a light breeze, other times not. Naturally, 'atmosphere' would make a difference. I can't have it too steamy though: foggy mirror. One solution to this is to wipe the mirror with tallow-based shaving soap and then wipe it off. Makes a film that doesn't fog up. Hm, this could be a new thread....



(03-03-2013, 03:01 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Good observation OP! I concur and have mentioned it in the past, though not to dwell on it. I assumed it happened to everyone when their indoor air was dry. Some sections of the country may not experience it as much as the cold(dry) belt of the planet.

I've noticed that my lather dries out for subsequent passes as well, and yes, it's worse in the winter when our home is dry as a bone. I've always blamed the dry air for it in the winter. OK, when it's -10°F outside and super dry because of the temperature (cold air simply cannot hold water vapor) it sucks the moisture out of our homes like blotter paper soaking up water. Heat with wood as we do and it compounds the problem since that ultra dry outdoor air is now being drawn into our home to feed the fire.

I do as others have suggested and wet my face and "rebuilt" the lather. In the winter I don't even test the lather, I just do it.

There may be another cause with certain brushes. Boar hair will soak up water. I allow my boar brushes to soak at most a minute or two, no more. If lather is built then allowed to sit during the first pass, the boar might steal water from the lather. But whether that's a factor or not the 2nd pass lather is always drier for me.

FWIW, even with a synthetic fiber brush the lather is drier, so there's more going on than boar hair soaking up water, I'm just suggesting that boar might be an additional factor.



It is relevant to add that right outside the bathroom door is a walk in closet but its more of an annex. In this annex is the AC intake duct.
We have central air conditioning at home. There are two ducts that blow air into the room and two that pull air out.

One of the ducts that pulls air out is in the annex. So if the AC is on in the room, the air is being blown out from one end then sucked in from another end. This sucking in end is next to the bathroom. If the door is open, some of it goes into the bathroom and out through the exhaust fan. I know there is a draft because sometimes I'll be showering and my wife will walk into the bathroom and bring a cold draft in with her.

So I know for a fact that there is a draft from the bedroom to the bathroom. Hence the drying out.

Heck, my brushes dry in a day (chubby 3 Manchurian). I mentioned that few months ago when people were saying their brushes needed two days to dry.

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 03-04-2013, 07:30 AM
#8
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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It gets very dry in MN during the winter, and I've seen something similar. I sometimes have to add a little water to my mix before the third pass.

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 03-04-2013, 04:00 PM
#9
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Humidity may have something to do with it, but changes in humidity shouldn't cause terribly noticeable drying or not of the lather.

I suspect that it is rather the air circulation that caused it rather than the added moisture from the shower. Perhaps you should try cutting just that out and seeing what happens.

Maybe just do a test lather and see how long it takes to dry.

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 03-04-2013, 08:14 PM
#10
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(03-04-2013, 04:00 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: Humidity may have something to do with it, but changes in humidity shouldn't cause terribly noticeable drying or not of the lather.

I suspect that it is rather the air circulation that caused it rather than the added moisture from the shower. Perhaps you should try cutting just that out and seeing what happens.

Maybe just do a test lather and see how long it takes to dry.

I may have to try that. Closing the door and turning off the fan but not running the shower. It really is a strong fan.

Running the shower while I get the shave ready doesn't bother me frankly.

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