03-05-2013, 07:01 PM
#1
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I'm not restoring this one!'
I've seen and read about double bladed razors in some books but never thought I'd have the chance to get one.
This one originated in England in the mid 1800's and made its way to France. Specifically to the Marquis de Goulaime of the Castle Goulaime in the Loire valley. The family is the oldest business in Europe at 1000 yrs old. The castle ( now called a chalet) was started in the year 970 or so and still stands today.
Iron Chef Bobby Flay credits this family's chef as the creator of the famous Beurre Blanc sauce.
I also got a letter of authentication , dated and signed with the blade.
As you can see the razor has hand painted bone scales which the design matches an etching on one of the blades. The other blade's etch simply says Plymouth.
I'm quite happy to be able to add an oddity such as this to my collection. From what I understand , they are quite rare.

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 03-05-2013, 08:45 PM
#2
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Wow, what an impressive razor!

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 03-05-2013, 08:52 PM
#3
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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Very cool! That is a neat peace of history my friend. Thank you for sharing.

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 03-05-2013, 09:47 PM
#4
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Very interesting indeed. What would be the purpose of having two blades like that? One for first pass, because of its particular characteristics, and the other for the second pass?

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 03-06-2013, 06:25 AM
#5
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Quite rare!

Wow. So cool! I can't imagine it being easy to shave with. I am curious - do the blades close off-centered intentionally, so the edges do not make contact? Can you post a top-down pic of it?

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 03-06-2013, 06:49 AM
#6
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Yes, it closes just like a pocket knife and for the same reasons. Here , one half of their shafts are flat and not beveled along their length like a typical razor. These flats are the mating surfaces for each blade. It's almost like you cut a regular razor in half, lengthwise, from spine to edge. But each blade still has a hollow grind of course.

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 03-06-2013, 07:00 AM
#7
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That is indeed an interesting find! Thank you for share it with us. Smile

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 03-06-2013, 12:52 PM
#8
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Hi Mark

I want to call it the Dark Knight (Batman) razor due to the way the two blades fold into the scales and remind me of bat wings (second & third photos from the top). I could even see something like that on Batman's utility belt, after all I assume even the Dark Knight has to shave...

Seriously, I find the etchings on the blades stunningly beautiful.

What are you plans for this razor? Leave as is or work (at least some of) your restoration magic on it?

Take care, Mike

Edit: Added link.

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 03-07-2013, 12:00 AM
#9
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Thanks guys,
Mike, I have already done some GENTLE work on the piece since I got it. I just want to keep it essentially as it is without doing too much to it. It would loose it's balance . Meaning, if I polished out say , the back of the blades, it wouldn't match the faces. And on the face ( etch side) there is very little I can do without damaging the etch as they are merely 'frosted' type etchings. And I also think that trying to fully restore a blade like this would almost be a crime. Lets face it, it's nearly 170 yrs. old and considering it's history it should look like it does. And I've been told that in all probability it is Whale Bone. Who knew?
I've gotten quite a bit of feedback on this piece from around the internet and most feel as it is, it's a museum quality piece. I think they say this because most of the other examples that have been found have been in terrible condition and from the feedback , this is the best example they have seen. I tend to trust their opinions as some of these guys have been around for a while and know what they are talking about.
One guy who seems to have the only copy of "The Complete History of Razors Known to Mankind" gave me a very through run down on the history of it as well as the Marquis and it's probable history. I think I'm going to try and follow up with the French Historical society and see what I can find out, if anything. It's a unique piece.


I got it by dumb luck as I had only seen them in some books but never thought I'd have one for my collection. But some things you just have to have and I got lucky.

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 03-07-2013, 10:40 AM
#10
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-07-2013, 12:00 AM)mycarver Wrote: Mike, I have already done some GENTLE work on the piece since I got it. I just want to keep it essentially as it is without doing too much to it. It would loose it's balance . Meaning, if I polished out say , the back of the blades, it wouldn't match the faces. And on the face ( etch side) there is very little I can do without damaging the etch as they are merely 'frosted' type etchings. And I also think that trying to fully restore a blade like this would almost be a crime. Lets face it, it's nearly 170 yrs. old and considering it's history it should look like it does. And I've been told that in all probability it is Whale Bone. Who knew?

Hi Mark

Makes good sense to me, after all somethings should be allowed to grow old, age, naturally and be appreciated for those exact qualities...

Take care, Mike

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