03-08-2013, 08:06 PM
#1
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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Sadly, after today's shave, my beloved Semogue Italian Barber "1305" LE started peeling. I had always avoided painted Semogues, as I was afraid of this happening, but I couldn't resist the LE, both because it was beautiful and I couldn't pass up a blonde 1305! I figured well, I have mild OCD and take very good care of my brushes, I never soak them past the halfway point, I always use warm water, never hot, I always make sure all excess water is removed before putting them up to dry. I never bang my brushes, I only face lather and am careful to never drop or rap them against anything...I have no idea what went wrong. It was used for only two dozen shaves at most, as you can see from the pics, where it is bubbling and peeling it seems to be following a line and there is a spot on the other side of the handle that is starting to bubble. This will be my last painted Semogue. Angry

My poor poor brush. Sad

[Image: iFjN4un.jpg]


[Image: Btozy7p.jpg]

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 03-08-2013, 08:10 PM
#2
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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I feel your pain , my friend...

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 03-08-2013, 08:12 PM
#3
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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That's too bad that could happen even when doing everything right.

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 03-08-2013, 08:13 PM
#4
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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Oh no! That's terrible... [Image: cry-smiley.gif?1292867577]

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 03-08-2013, 08:18 PM
#5
  • Andrew
  • Senior Member
  • Austin, TX
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Does anyone paint on any protective coating before using these painted wood Semogues?

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 03-08-2013, 08:25 PM
#6
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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(03-08-2013, 08:18 PM)Andrew Wrote: Does anyone paint on any protective coating before using these painted wood Semogues?

I'm sure some do, but honestly, we shouldn't have to. I thought Semogue changed their paint and/or process a while back to help prevent this but I guess it can always happen, no matter how well you take care of it.

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 03-08-2013, 08:28 PM
#7
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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In my view Semogues are for everyday use and I have never re-coated any of the wooden handled ones that I have. I think a little bit of wear adds character. Chipped paint doesn't bother me really. On an expensive brush it might, but Semogues are cheap enough. I prefer wooden, unpainted handles all the same, but I see you really liked the paintwork, that's a bummer. I notice there are some scrapes at the head of the handle and on the ring; perhaps you are knocking the handle against the bowl if you are bowl lathering??

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 03-08-2013, 08:32 PM
#8
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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(03-08-2013, 08:28 PM)Shaun Wrote: In my view Semogues are for everyday use and I have never re-coated any of the wooden handled ones that I have. I think a little bit of wear adds character. Chipped paint doesn't bother me really. On an expensive brush it might, but Semogues are cheap enough. I prefer wooden, unpainted handles all the same, but I see you really liked the paintwork, that's a bummer. I notice there are some scrapes at the head of the handle and on the ring; perhaps you are knocking the handle against the bowl if you are bowl lathering??

This is my first and now most likely my only painted handle brush and normally I would agree about the "character" but not in this instance as the beautiful colors were a primary reason for buying it. Also I mentioned in my post I face lather exclusively and, having mild OCD, I am always very very careful about banging or rapping my brushes on anything. Also those are not scrapes, if you look closely it is the reflection of the bristles in the paint.

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 03-08-2013, 08:47 PM
#9
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Ah yes, correct. I wonder if the steam in your bathroom might be a contributing factor? Most probably not though. The other theory I have about painted handles is that there might be slight wood shrinkage over time and the paint doesn't conform. Most would assume the wood expands if it gets wet, but you don't soak the handle ( and neither do I). If it is wood shrinkage, perhaps the wood hadn't been throughly seasoned...and the difference in the type of wood used would make a different too. Birch is good for a handle, in my view. I use Marttiini fishing knives (yes the spelling is correct), for example, and they stay perfectly aligned no matter what.

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 03-08-2013, 09:04 PM
#10
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Byron, how unfortunate!

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 03-08-2013, 09:47 PM
#11
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Byron, that is truly upsetting! I too have OCD traits, and can understand your predicament ... regardless how cheap or expensive the brush may be, it is frustrating to see this happen to an item that has been meticulously cared for.

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 03-08-2013, 09:50 PM
#12
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That's the pits!

I'm guessing that it might have been a manufacturing flaw in the hole that the knot was glued into. Too, we tend to think of paint as being impermeable, but it isn't. It only slows down the rate at which water gets through to the wood. It also slows down the rate at which water leaves the wood. Once in the wood it can create havoc.

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 03-08-2013, 10:07 PM
#13
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My shave collection OCD trembled at the sight of your poor brush. After my original Tweezerman began to look bedraggled despite my best efforts, I pledged to forswear wooden handle brushes. Nevertheless, you have my sympathies.

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 03-08-2013, 10:37 PM
#14
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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That sucks, and it's a good example of why I am not at all interested in wooden handles. Wood and water do not play well together, long-term.

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 03-08-2013, 10:43 PM
#15
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Oh most wooden handles are pretty good really. It's the paint that often chips. You can get all natural, which I prefer. Semogues are generally very good quality in my experience.

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 03-08-2013, 10:47 PM
#16
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I am sorry to see this about your LE brush. I'm afraid that a 1305 is still at the very very top of my WTB list, so I will see how one fares in my house soon. Frustrating for you, I am sure.

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 03-09-2013, 12:48 AM
#17
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Does that brush dry in a stand or setting on the handle with the bristles up?

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 03-09-2013, 01:34 AM
#18
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I dented my Simpsons Jubilee and it bothered me so much I purchased another...

So I feel your pain. The Jubilee was my fault (well, the fault of whoever dropped it and I maintain it wasn't me and unlikely anyone at Simpsons), but I would have thought that some sort of coating would have been applied to your Semogue during manufacture to assist with preventing such disaster... ?

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 03-09-2013, 03:15 AM
#19
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Made note to myself, don't buy painted handles. I would be disappointed too

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 03-09-2013, 04:22 AM
#20
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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It does seem like I've seen this with the Italian Barber LE more than the other painted brushes in Semogue's line up. I wonder why that would be?

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