03-25-2013, 12:17 AM
#21
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I'd take a picture if I could, but I don't have three hands.

I took a look under 20x magnification (Belomo Loupe if you're wondering) at my HIS synthetic and there's absolutely no flagging whatsoever. Very tapered tips, and bent tips, but no splitting.

Not saying the process used to flag tips doesn't help, but the word flagging or flagged does refer to split or exploded ends in the trade.

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 03-25-2013, 12:20 AM
#22
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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Wonderful write up, thank-you!

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 03-25-2013, 02:41 AM
#23
  • Codfish
  • Product Tester
  • Connecticut Shoreline
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(03-25-2013, 12:17 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: I'd take a picture if I could, but I don't have three hands.

I took a look under 20x magnification (Belomo Loupe if you're wondering) at my HIS synthetic and there's absolutely no flagging whatsoever. Very tapered tips, and bent tips, but no splitting.

Not saying the process used to flag tips doesn't help, but the word flagging or flagged does refer to split or exploded ends in the trade.

Lee, the H.I.S. brush isn't a Mühle. The fibers are thin, I agree, but I question whether they're identical or finished/treated exactly the same as Mühle's.

Granted, the Black Fibres may differ from STF fibers, too. Maybe we should both compare apples to apples.

Whether flagging or tapering is most responsible for the V2's performance, do you agree with me that there are significant improvements in performance and feel?

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 03-25-2013, 04:50 AM
#24
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Very nice job....Thumbup

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 03-25-2013, 06:27 AM
#25
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Jim, thank you for the very informative review of synthetics ... it certainly increased my understanding of the topic. I look forward to seeing what further evolutionary changes will occur with future 'generations', as this appears to be a constantly changing field.

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 03-25-2013, 06:48 AM
#26
  • Codfish
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  • Connecticut Shoreline
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(03-25-2013, 06:27 AM)Agravic Wrote: Jim, thank you for the very informative review of synthetics ... it certainly increased my understanding of the topic. I look forward to seeing what further evolutionary changes will occur with future 'generations', as this appears to be a constantly changing field.

In the high-tech world, Moore's Law states that computing capacity doubles every two years.

In the generally low-tech shaving world, it seems that new generations of synthetic fibers appear now at about the same rate! Smile Cool Tongue

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 03-25-2013, 06:53 AM
#27
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I need to eventually try a synthetic brush.

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 03-25-2013, 07:19 AM
#28
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(03-25-2013, 06:48 AM)Codfish Wrote: In the world of high-tech, Moore's Law states that computing capacity doubles every two years.

In the generally low-tech world of shaving, it seems that generations of synthetic fibers are appearing at about the same rate! Smile Cool Tongue

Nice one, Jim! Biggrin

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 03-25-2013, 08:54 AM
#29
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Very nice write up Jim!

How do the gen 3.5 and gen 4 brushes do at face lathering?

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 03-25-2013, 09:11 AM
#30
  • Codfish
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(03-25-2013, 08:54 AM)wingdo Wrote: Very nice write up Jim!

How do the gen 3.5 and gen 4 brushes do at face lathering?

They're both excellent. I have used both generations, and I face lather 100% of the time. Gen 4 is has noticeably softer tips, greater backbone and excellent density. Of the two, I can't say enough about Gen 4.

The H.I.S. brush has similar fibers, which are dense and soft, but the tall loft is not to my liking. It's fine for painting motions, but I find it difficult to splay and use effectively. For those on a limited budget, and who like painting motions, it's available for about $40.

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 03-25-2013, 10:16 AM
#31
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(03-25-2013, 09:11 AM)Codfish Wrote:
(03-25-2013, 08:54 AM)wingdo Wrote: Very nice write up Jim!

How do the gen 3.5 and gen 4 brushes do at face lathering?

They're both excellent. I have used both generations, and I face lather 100% of the time. Gen 4 is has noticeably softer tips, greater backbone and excellent density. Of the two, I can't say enough about Gen 4.

The H.I.S. brush has similar fibers, which are dense and soft, but the tall loft is not to my liking. It's fine for painting motions, but I find it difficult to splay and use effectively. For those on a limited budget, and who like painting motions, it's available for about $40.

I was in the H.I.S pass around last year and hated the brush due to the extreme loft. I may have to look into the v2 set at 23mm.

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 03-25-2013, 10:40 AM
#32
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(03-25-2013, 02:41 AM)Codfish Wrote: Whether flagging or tapering is most responsible for the V2's performance, do you agree with me that there are significant improvements in performance and feel?

Oh absolutely.

The flagging thing is just semantics. But since it's a term that means something in the paintbrush industry, it can be confusing if we start to use it to mean something else when talking about brushes.

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 03-25-2013, 10:59 AM
#33
  • Codfish
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  • Connecticut Shoreline
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(03-25-2013, 10:16 AM)wingdo Wrote: I was in the H.I.S pass around last year and hated the brush due to the extreme loft. I may have to look into the v2 set at 23mm.

I was practicing my diplomacy skills. Here I come, State Department! :yho: 24

(03-25-2013, 10:40 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: Oh absolutely.

The flagging thing is just semantics. But since it's a term that means something in the paintbrush industry, it can be confusing if we start to use it to mean something else when talking about brushes.

IS there a term used in the shaving industry for the "forking" I photographed in the Black Fiber brush? Or the wavy patterns in some of the fibers? I'd like to be more accurate in my characterizations. "Forking" and "curling" are admittedly lame, but "tapering" falls short for me, too...Confused

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 03-25-2013, 12:05 PM
#34
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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Jim, great article and loved how you broke down the history.

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 03-25-2013, 12:44 PM
#35
  • Codfish
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(03-25-2013, 12:05 PM)Howler Wrote: Jim, great article and loved how you broke down the history.

That history was provided courtesy of Gary Carrington, who spend many hours researching the development of synthetic brushes. I haven't seen anything like it anywhere else, and we all owe him a debt of gratitude for is work.

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 03-25-2013, 02:23 PM
#36
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[retracted] My apologies, the Gent who started this thread pointed out that this was not the time or place for what I previously posted. My apologies to the good folks on this forum.

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 03-25-2013, 02:47 PM
#37
  • Codfish
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(03-25-2013, 02:23 PM)jcall1975 Wrote: People seem to like the Muhle synthetic brushes but would you buy one considering Wet Shave Products has incredible brushes (IMO) at the same price points?

I am not familiar with WSP synths, and I don't see any listed in their online catalog. I'd be happy to test one when/if they become available, and to pass it along to the team as well.

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 03-25-2013, 03:09 PM
#38
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(03-25-2013, 02:23 PM)jcall1975 Wrote: People seem to like the Muhle synthetic brushes but would you buy one considering Wet Shave Products has incredible brushes (IMO) at the same price points?

Gents - choices are good. This article is meant to educate wetshavers on a fat-developing segment of our little hobby. There is no need to discuss relative pricing or comparisons to a specific vendor.

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 03-25-2013, 03:15 PM
#39
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(03-25-2013, 10:59 AM)Codfish Wrote: IS there a term used in the shaving industry for the "forking" I photographed in the Black Fiber brush? Or the wavy patterns in some of the fibers? I'd like to be more accurate in my characterizations. "Forking" and "curling" are admittedly lame, but "tapering" falls short for me, too...Confused

Honestly I can't make it out. I'll go back and review the picture and edit this post if I can see what you're talking about.

In the shaving world, no. But in paint brushes and in the synthetic fiber trade, the curling is called "crimping". Tapering is the correct term to use to refer to anything that goes from thick to thin, where the degree refers to how fast it tapers to the thin end.

Edit:
I can sort of see what you're referring to, can you confirm that it forks from a single strand and it's not just two strands? I'd like to see the individual shaft and where it forks.

That said, we'll just have to call it forking since that's a very accurate term. I suppose flagging could be used, but that's a completely different process to flag a tip than to fork it. Not sure why they would choose to fork a fiber when they could just make it thinner and taper it to achieve the same feel. Maybe forking the tip allows for a strong core up to the fork, and then the fork allows the fibers to splay out more and feel more like a natural fiber which offers varying degrees of resistance as you press the hairs against your face.

I know that my one issue with synthetics is the very strong backbone and inability for the tips to want to splay out. (hope I'm describing it correctly)

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 03-25-2013, 03:23 PM
#40
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[deleted}

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