03-25-2013, 08:23 AM
#1
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Gents,

I bought a new fitness machine and got it all set up in my basement. I'm going to pick up 275 lbs of olympic weight plates sometime this week along with the 10 lbs I already have.

I haven't lifted weights in probably 10 years so I lost a lot of the knowledge I had with different exercises and what the rep counts should start out at.

I'm in need of a routine if anyone would be interested in helping me out.

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 03-25-2013, 09:57 AM
#2
  • MrTGun
  • Junior Member
  • Toronto, Ontario
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Not a guru by any sense of the word and left the traditional weights behind a long time ago in favour of Kettlebells, primal movement training, and HIIT cross fit style workouts. When I was using traditional equipment the old adage of heavy weight/low reps was my key to my biggest "gains". As well as focusing heavily on the rest/nutrition/not over training component

I wish I could speak more eloquently on the subject but like you, my knowledge is dated.

Happy to answer any questions re: kettlebells/bodyweight/gymnastic type training should it ever become part of your routine.

Good Luck with the new gear!

~TG

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 03-25-2013, 10:08 AM
#3
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Andrew,
My bachelor's degree is in Exercise Science and I almost sat for the National Strength & Conditioning Association tests but I was in the middle of chiropractic boards at the time. So while I can point you in a lot of directions there are plenty of different viewpoints out there and they all can work. I'd suggest looking into a few different approaches.

I personally prefer full body workouts compared to split sets (i.e. upper body one day, lower the next) & like multi-joint movement over single joint movements (think bench press and squat over bicep or leg curls). I also recommend HIIT type workouts and would love to have a place to do CrossFit / Kettlebell exercises near me.

I have to run now but I'll try to add to this thread a bit later. Hopefully Lee will pop in with his thoughts as I know he hits the gym regularly.

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 03-25-2013, 10:55 AM
#4
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I wouldn't say I'm a guru, but I'd say fitness is 50% of my life.

Since you have stopped exercising and probably aren't in terribly good shape, you should focus on cardio and full body workouts.

You'll want to do pushups, pullups, squats, and of course abs.

The hard part about abs is doing the exercises right. There's a lot of leeway and you can engage a lot of other muscles in doing the motion.

The best ab exercises are actually the simplest. But they get boring after a while. Also, don't think that doing abs is going to burn the stomach fat, it doesn't. Cardio does that.

For abs, I'd do captains chairs, then do bicycles, then do regular situps. That's a pretty easy routine to focus on.

Other than abs, you just want to focus on compound workouts. Do those until you can do a good number and then we can add some more exercises to the routine.

Always focus on cardio as that is where you'll lose all the fat. Even walking on the treadmill or eliptical will burn calories. Don't discount walking!!! Walk faster if you want to burn more calories faster, but don't run for five minutes and then stop, it doesn't do you any good. Cardio should last at least 20 minutes, but 30 is better, and an hour is even better.

If you can't do a regular pullup, use the assist machine. Then when you can't do anymore overhand pullups, switch to underhand and do another set.

You need to break up your workout into sets. I personally do 4 sets. I'd recommend at least 3 sets.

You don't need to kill yourself. Your muscles will get stronger as long as you bring them close to the point of failure. You don't need to bring them to failure. That just risks tearing and you don't want to be out for 5 weeks healing.

What I do is 10, 8, 6, 4. All at the same weight, except for the last two sets where I judge whether I should go up in weight or not. The goal is to get a good burn, but not failure.

Another rule I have is that if I can't lift it 8x I shouldn't be doing that weight. I've hurt myself too many times doing the 4x rep sets. Not worth it. Ego is not worth the pain.

Anyway, for you, you'll probably start with something like this:

Your sets should be X times until you really feel the burn. Stop. Rest. Repeat for at least 2 sets until you really really feel the burn and your body tells you to stop. Whatever the number of sets you choose, make sure you have the energy to do a whole set. Don't go to failure in set 1.

Your very first workout should just explore how fit you are and give you some bench marks with which to start. This is why it's very helpful to have someone actually there with you.

You'll make gains very rapidly if you keep up with it, then they'll start tapering off. Don't worry, this is natural. Just like sports cars, it takes 10x as much effort the stronger you are.

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 03-25-2013, 11:00 AM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I worked up a sweat just reading that Lee.

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 03-25-2013, 11:33 AM
#6
  • MrTGun
  • Junior Member
  • Toronto, Ontario
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Lee's advice is solid and Squats are king for sure. On days where you get bored, or motivation is low don't discount getting outside to "play" with movement as well. It can be a great way to break up a routine, and it instantly reminds you how most of us under utilize the tool we've been given

Like I said above, I gave up on traditional methods a long time ago because it was hard for me to stay motivated, and body weight/movement base training became my focus. Not only that, it lends itself very well to my primary passion which is bouldering and sport climbing.

On days where I need to remind myself why I'm doing all of it, all I need to do is watch a few Ido Portal videos and I'm back on track. I would probably rob a Nun in broad daylight in fact if someone told it would get a spot in one of Ido's training camps.



~TG

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 03-25-2013, 01:06 PM
#7
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Totally forgot about sports.

Any physical activity is great. Period. As long as you don't hurt yourself or overdo it.

Walking around the mall, baseball, tag football, ultimate frisbee, golf, tennis, etc etc.

It doesn't have to be in the gym. I may live there, but you don't have to.

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 03-25-2013, 02:01 PM
#8
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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Keep in mind there are two results when working with resistance training. High weight and low reps will build bulk, while high reps with lower weight will build lean muscle tissue, and stamina.

I'm a runner so I focus on 12-15 reps of every resistance exercise I do.

I also have to disagree with Lee on just one simple point he made...The run/walk method. In my experience, just like HIIT (high intensity interval training), interval training in your cardio routine will scorch calories and fat, but it isn't recommended for new runners. You must first build a solid base before doing too much speed work, which is what interval training would be considered. None the less if you can't sustain a run for a given period of time the run/walk method will be a good choice for you. Raising your heart rate, then recovering, then repeating the process, will scorch calories and fat and quick.

If you've ever wondered how folks lose so much weight on shows like the biggest loser it due to the interval training that they do. They never stop moving, they just move in different ways. They will go from high intensity cardio to low intensity resistance. Well that and the fact that they have world class trainers and nutritionists, but still the exercise principles work for everyone.

Also keep in mind exercise is only half the battle. Without a clean diet, you won't get the results you expect you will.

As far as suggesting things for you to do. I like Men's Health. You can select what part of your body you want to work and it will give you a list of exercises to do and what parts of the body they target. Over time you can tailor a program that meets your needs based on what you've learned. I also agree with the circuit training principles. Don't stop moving for as long as you can go, and roll from one exercise to the next doing a minimum of 3 sets, and you will see results. For someone who's been away, it's definitely a good idea to focus on the upper one day, and the lower the next. This keeps you from getting too sore. When you build up then you can do full body circuits, which were my favorites when I was just doing resistance training.

Currently my exercise routine consists of 20-30 miles a week running and 3 upper body work outs a week. I do a circuit though and I do all at home. I start with bicep curls (12-15) reps, then I do tricep dips/extensions or some variation there of (do to failure), then push ups (to failure), then bent over rows, lawn mowers or some other back/shoulder exercise (12-15). I also do 90 crunches every morning before work, and 90 crunches every day after my run. Core work makes me a stronger runner, doesn't give me a six pack. When I speak of doing an exercise to failure, I mean until you can't maintain proper form. You should never push beyond that point as you risk doing damage, as has been mentioned.

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 03-25-2013, 02:05 PM
#9
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Actually I didn't suggest doing interval cardio, that's just crazy, I don't even do it. I said if you can't do a whole 20 minutes of running, then walk for 20-60 minutes instead or do 10 minutes running and then walk the rest of the time. Or at least that's how I meant it to come across.

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 03-25-2013, 02:13 PM
#10
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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(03-25-2013, 02:05 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: Actually I didn't suggest doing interval cardio, that's just crazy, I don't even do it. I said if you can't do a whole 20 minutes of running, then walk for 20-60 minutes instead or do 10 minutes running and then walk the rest of the time. Or at least that's how I meant it to come across.

Oops..Sorry Lee. Guess I misunderstood that part. Yeah, just re-read that section and totally missed the boat on it. I apologize.

I also used to the ladder method that you talked about and saw tremendous results with that method. I would increase weight with each set, but decrease the number of reps.

Let me also clarify I am not a guru by any stretch of the imagination. Hope that my posts have helped in some form or fashion.

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