04-10-2013, 05:51 PM
#1
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I read recently about the damage that can be done to a badger brush when improperly using it to generate lather. Pressing the brush down or swirling too aggressively I understand can cause the hair to split or be crushed. But what about when applying lather to my face, is it best to swirl or paint ?

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 04-10-2013, 06:01 PM
#2
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I like to paint but I will swirl sometimes on the lather hogs to release some more lather.

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 04-10-2013, 06:07 PM
#3
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I can't say which is best, because I do a little of both. Damaging a brush is theoretically possible if one is a gorilla or if you're trying to rub the bark off a tree with it, but in normal use by a normal person, the lower quality of the materials and workmanship that went into the brush, the more chance of problems. I've only had problems with two brushes, both due to error in workmanship. One was a Koh-I-Noor boar brush and the other a Rooney Finest (true!) The knot on the Rooney lost hair in clumps and the knot came out finally. The glue job was obviously flawed, and I've since had that brush fixed by Bernd at Shavemac. The Koh-I-Noor just wanted to shed about a dozen or more hairs every time I used it. I got a replacement boar knot from Tony at Golden Nib and now it's as good as new, if not better. My point is: damage comes from within under normal use due to human error or bad glue. Damage from without would come from a lot of accidental things, but probably not from just using it for the purpose it was made.

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 04-10-2013, 06:18 PM
#4
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I swirl on the puck and paint on the face...

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 04-10-2013, 06:37 PM
#5
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swirl for the first few minutes and then paint the lather smooth.

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 04-10-2013, 06:43 PM
#6
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I do both as well. I swirl to load the brush and paint when the lather is ready.

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 04-10-2013, 07:05 PM
#7
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(04-10-2013, 06:37 PM)andrewjs18 Wrote: swirl for the first few minutes and then paint the lather smooth.

+1 i have never seen much wear to my used brushes, so far, but i can report back in 10-15 years.Biggrin

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 04-10-2013, 07:12 PM
#8
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I do both, but mostly swirling. Swirling to load the brush and build the lather on the face, then painting motions to even it up before putting the razor to it.

I recently read about the split badger hairs theory also. I think it's someones fantasy. If they do split I get a softer badger right? Sounds like a pure badger could turn into silvertip softness then. Has anyone done this or experienced it? Pure rubbish.

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 04-10-2013, 07:22 PM
#9
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I too swirl to load and build the lather on my face, then paint to even it all out.

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 04-10-2013, 07:31 PM
#10
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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I swirl vigorously with medium pressure for about 30 seconds, not enough to bottom out the brush but enough to make it splay a bit.
This helps build lather up to there I want it, and it feels great on the face..once the lather is where I want it I use painting motions to evenly distribute and smooth out the lather.

Yes I'm aware that all the experts say swirling motions will cause shedding and donut holes but believe that is a load of bull as long as you're not mashing it to the hilt and going to town like a industrial food mixer.
But..just in case, I never use expensive brushes (all under $75 and most under $30) and stick mostly to boar and synthetic...I also prefer them more anyway, so it's win win. Wink

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 04-10-2013, 07:38 PM
#11
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(04-10-2013, 07:12 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Has anyone done this or experienced it? Pure rubbish.

You have said it!

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 04-10-2013, 07:52 PM
#12
  • MickToley
  • Hi, I'm Mike and I'm a shave soap addict
  • Brooklyn, NY
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Swirl then paint Cool

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 04-10-2013, 08:21 PM
#13
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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I swirl at first to cover my face and then paint to smooth it out.

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 04-10-2013, 08:45 PM
#14
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@OP,
If you mash the brush down very hard where the hairs are bent beyond their natural capacity, they will break at the bending point if done too often (once may be too much sometimes).

Otherwise, your brush should be fine. Soap scum is the killer of knots. Not really sure why though. But I've seen it happen. That and dropping them. Any damage to the internal glue that holds the knot together will cause hairs to fall out.


(04-10-2013, 07:12 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I recently read about the split badger hairs theory also. I think it's someones fantasy. If they do split I get a softer badger right? Sounds like a pure badger could turn into silvertip softness then. Has anyone done this or experienced it? Pure rubbish.

@OP & SD


I have never heard nor seen any badger hairs split that didn't come that way from the factory (due to excessive bleaching). Maybe if you sandpapered black badger hair on 1,000 grit paper, it might make them split, but I'd imagine it would just taper the tips more.

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 04-10-2013, 09:16 PM
#15
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
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I like paint strokes when I bowl lather and I tend to swirl when I face lather. When I do face lather I never really agressively mash or swirl the brush, not to spare the brush but because I don't find it comfortable. Anyway I have been on a bowl lathering kick for a few months.

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 04-10-2013, 09:31 PM
#16
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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The badger brushes I have seen and experienced through 2nd hand purchases (all knowingly) were damaged by the hairs breaking off in the middle of the knot. I don't believe that the manner in which you use the brush would cause this by itself, but my theory is that brushes that aren't rinsed well will allow the residue to degrade the tensile strength of the hairs and when the hairs finally give they give at the point where they are stressed the most. When you swirl the brush the hair in the middle of the knot is flexed more than the hair on the outside of the knot (on standard bulb and fan shaped knots anyway) and this is where the breakage occurs.

That said I swirl the majority of the face lathering duration, switching to painting strokes only when the lather reaches the consistence I want. After I am done shaving I rinse the brush thoroughly and soak in clean water as I clean everything else up. The brush is the last thing to get put up after a final rinse and shake.

   

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 04-11-2013, 02:04 AM
#17
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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Swirl then paint.

Rinse like there's no tomorrow.

Comb straight before storing them.

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 04-11-2013, 03:58 AM
#18
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I also swirl then paint.

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 04-11-2013, 04:46 AM
#19
  • RobE
  • Active Member
  • NY USA
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(04-11-2013, 02:04 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Swirl then paint.
Already do.
(04-11-2013, 02:04 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Rinse like there's no tomorrow.
Yup.
(04-11-2013, 02:04 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Comb straight before storing them.
Duh! I've never even thought of that (it all seems so clear now) Smile Thank you!

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 04-11-2013, 05:17 AM
#20
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Just do this instead:


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