05-03-2013, 03:05 PM
#1
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I'm loving the 1001 options for cremes, soaps, blades, razors, 100+ different knot types, etc.... But if I wanted to duplicate the shaving experience that my G'dad had what would the combo be? I'm thinking a circa 1940's Gillette 3pcs Ball handle, Wilkinson blades and Williams soap... Yes ? No ?

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 05-03-2013, 03:20 PM
#2
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When did he start shaving? Everybody's grandfather is a different age...

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 05-03-2013, 03:26 PM
#3
  • clk
  • Member
  • Louisville, Kentucky
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Probably a tech or ss with a bath bar or, if he was progressive, Williams.

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 05-03-2013, 04:03 PM
#4
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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Porter's was around, and so was....BURMASHAVE !! Gillette blades, likely methinks.
IF the location, in question is the USA. Most of my older relatives were soap men, I have asked around throughout the course of my life. (long-term shave geek) The only response to asking about BurmaShave, was: "MEH...it's shave cream ! " yep, Williams has been around since forever, and Colgate almost forever. OS was late 40's and my Dad (not Grandad) liked it because he got less "itch" on his neck, post-shave. When I razored-up in the mid-60's, that soap was the one for me, for the same reason.

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 05-03-2013, 04:15 PM
#5
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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Throw Skin Bracer or Club Man in there too.

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 05-03-2013, 10:04 PM
#6
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Well, my Granddad used a Double Duck Straight Razor, Ever Ready Boar Brush, and Williams Soap.

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 05-04-2013, 04:12 AM
#7
  • savagejoerude
  • If you ain't a LOSER, you ain't livin'!!
  • New Orleans USA
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A sharp rock and bear grease...

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 05-04-2013, 06:05 AM
#8
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(05-03-2013, 03:20 PM)Jabberwock Wrote: When did he start shaving? Everybody's grandfather is a different age...

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Good question his adult age would make a big difference.
Well I was born in '58 he was born in 1908 I'm guessing he probably started shaving some time in his early 20's so let's say around 1930.

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 05-04-2013, 07:27 AM
#9
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Mine was about 1890. Not much choice in razor types here(:-)!

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 05-04-2013, 03:29 PM
#10
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My Grandfathers were born in 1914 and 1921.

I did not know what they shaved with. I did not really become aware of their shaving items until I started shaving and my choices in 1975 were Trac II and Foamy in a can. By then a majority of people were moving in those directions including my grandfathers. Their old stuff has long been lost so it is only speculation now.

I do know however that growing into manhood in the depression caused them to choose one of each needed item that was locally available and they stuck to it. For many farming families, like mine were, products that came from the farm were used because money was tight. More than likely early on they used Ivory soap or whatever soap the families made. What ever was available at rural drug stores would supply a brush and maybe some Williams or Colgate shaving soap, a Gillette or a DE razor from a competitor.

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 05-04-2013, 04:19 PM
#11
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
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Late 20s would be Old Type and Improved, he could have switched to TTO in 1934. But straights were still being used in that era and my grandfather used one through the 50s and 60s.

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 05-05-2013, 04:31 AM
#12
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Great insights gentlemen.
My G'dad was a depression baby as well and raise "dirt floor poor" as he used to say. So I imagine GD is spot on and he likely only employed the bear minimum to perform the basic task of shaving. As I stop to consider my growing shave den the thought of collecting several duplicate items in the service of what was only meant to be a pedestrian task of shaving is salient. I'm reminded to keep my collection in it's proper perspective. My collection is a luxury and I'm blessed with "some" resources to indulge my hobby. Blessings are followed with thanksgivings to Him who so richly provides my daily bread. Thanksgivings offered up to Him with a prayer that His Comforter gives me the insight to keep my wants and my needs in their proper place.

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 05-05-2013, 06:27 AM
#13
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Nothing widens the age gap more for me than reading when your grandfathers were born, 1914, depression era, etc.

My Father was born in 1911 and my Grandfather was born in 1881.

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 05-05-2013, 08:21 AM
#14
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(05-05-2013, 06:27 AM)Johnny Wrote: Nothing widens the age gap more for me than reading when your grandfathers were born, 1914, depression era, etc.

My Father was born in 1911 and my Grandfather was born in 1881.

My word you must share a rich history dating back to a wonderful era when Men were Men and Ladies were treated as such.
I'm aware that we've done much good since then, Civil Rights, Women Rights, etc... And not all was "wine and roses" but the oral history that you and your family must have at your disposal is sadly being lost to time.

Probably not the proper thread to share it but I'd enjoy hearing anything you'd care to share concerning what it was like when.....

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 05-05-2013, 09:16 AM
#15
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(05-05-2013, 08:21 AM)Markh58 Wrote:
(05-05-2013, 06:27 AM)Johnny Wrote: Nothing widens the age gap more for me than reading when your grandfathers were born, 1914, depression era, etc.

My Father was born in 1911 and my Grandfather was born in 1881.

My word you must share a rich history dating back to a wonderful era when Men were Men and Ladies were treated as such.
I'm aware that we've done much good since then, Civil Rights, Women Rights, etc... And not all was "wine and roses" but the oral history that you and your family must have at your disposal is sadly being lost to time.

Probably not the proper thread to share it but I'd enjoy hearing anything you'd care to share concerning what it was like when.....

I will have to work on that. Most of the history is written down in family journals, diaries, family Bibles, and a very large family tree.

I asked a lot of questions when I was young as I knew they would not be here forever. Both of my parents and both set of grandparents passed away many years ago.

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 05-06-2013, 05:04 PM
#16
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My mother's father was born in 1875 and died September 11, 1925. He lived and died in the Missouri Ozarks. I'm sure he used a straight.

My father's father was born in 1880 and died in 1960. He probably used a straight until the 1910s or even later.

My father was born in 1908 and died in 1967. I was born in 1957. I have my father's two Gillettes, a 1955 blue tip and a 1962 flare. I also have his Seaforth shaving mug and boar brush (name eradicated). I shave often with one or the other of his Super Speeds. I used his Seaforth mug for years, but retired it seven or eight years ago: I feared I would break it. I now own several other Seaforth mugs and use them often. I use his brush very rarely.

Because my father died when I was young, his shaving items mean a great deal to me. Using them is a very tangible link to him.

I will use them tomorrow and post the pic.

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 05-06-2013, 09:38 PM
#17
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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It is great to have that connection. Two of my Schick Injectors were razors that my Dad owned. One he was issued in WWII and the other one he purchased new in 1946-48 and it has never been used. I keep it in my safe deposit box with other valuables.

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 05-07-2013, 01:11 PM
#18
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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My grandpa was born in 1927 and my earliest memories of him include watching him shave on his visits from Nebraska. He used an electric razor...

I'm sure as a younger lad he used something more related to our topic, but since he passed in December and had suffered from dementia we never got on that topic. I do know that he did not leave any traditional shaving supplies behind and being a career engineer (for John Deere) he probably switched over to the electric as soon as it came out.

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 05-07-2013, 01:45 PM
#19
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[Image: mWFgDtr.jpg]

I posted this in the Shave of the Day forum, but I couldn't figure out how to link just to that particular post--so I'm repeating myself . . .

The shave:

1. Soap: Williams;

2. Mug: Seaforth "Heather 'n' Fern";

3. Brush: unknown vintage boar;

4. Razor: Gillette Super Speed flare tip, 1962 (forgotten the specific date code);

5. Blade: Wilkinson;

6. Aftershave: Old Spice.

The jabbering:

I didn't use a dedicated preshave product. After showering, I I just lathered up a bit with the Williams, rubbed it into my face with my hand, and then let it sit for a moment while I finished whipping up a full lather.

The shave was excellent. I like Super Speeds, and I can almost always get a great shave with one.

The razor was my father's, as was the brush. I purchased the mug a few years ago. I have his old Seaforth Heather 'n' Fern mug, but I don't use it for fear of breaking it.

The brush is in pretty poor shape. The bristles have gotten pretty soft, and it loses a few bristles each time I use it. I have used it only twice this year--once for this photo and once on the anniversary of his death (April 11). Otherwise, for a truly vintage shave I use an old Ever-Ready 100 or a Peerless with nylon bristles--and an amazing amount of skritch!

The old blades in this photo are ones that I've received through eBay purchases of razors. I don't collect old blades, but I have gathered these few. I know that my father had some Gillettes in the medicine cabinet when he died (they remained there for years), but I can't remember exactly the style of Gillette. The Wilkinson seemed appropriately vintage.

The pocketknife was my father's. He ground quite a frown into the principal blade. I don't carry this knife (although I do carry a Case stockman, except when traveling by air or going into a courthouse).

The photo shows me and my father, circa 1962 or 1963.

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