05-16-2013, 12:44 AM
#1
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Due to health issues and allergies I'm in a situation of having to make my own shave soap which is fine as I already make my own bar and laundry soap. So I'm wondering who here uses home made shave soap or some other un-convential approach.

Here's my basic plan of attack:

Tallow Beef - 40%
Stearic Acid - 29%
Cocoa Butter - 16%
Coconut Oil - 8%
Shea Butter - 5%
Lanolin - 2%
Tussah Silk - A pinch

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 05-16-2013, 02:56 AM
#2
  • TRBeck
  • Unregistered
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I make my own. I would increase your coconut oil some, as I like my lather with a bit more fluff than 8% will produce. Otherwise, assuming no allergies to shea or lanolin, this is a good start. You have the right approach with a good amount of stearic acid, and this should be pretty emollient with the cocoa, shea, and lanolin. Good luck!

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 05-17-2013, 01:08 AM
#3
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(05-16-2013, 02:56 AM)TRBeck Wrote: I make my own. I would increase your coconut oil some, as I like my lather with a bit more fluff than 8% will produce. Otherwise, assuming no allergies to shea or lanolin, this is a good start. You have the right approach with a good amount of stearic acid, and this should be pretty emollient with the cocoa, shea, and lanolin. Good luck!

I'm actually pretty concerned about the allergy issue which is why I'm making it, if I could drop the shea I would, maybe up the Tallow? I would like the absolute fewest ingredients I can get away with so if you see something I can take out I'm all for it.

Thanks for the input!

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 05-17-2013, 10:55 AM
#4
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Let us know how it goes!

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 05-17-2013, 02:27 PM
#5
  • marcel
  • Member
  • The Netherlands
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The OP seems to be banned so we'll never know I'm afraid.

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 05-17-2013, 02:37 PM
#6
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(05-17-2013, 02:27 PM)marcel Wrote: The OP seems to be banned so we'll never know I'm afraid.

Just temporarily.

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 05-20-2013, 11:55 AM
#7
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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I have made one that definitely works (and I need to send samples to a few people for varied opinions) and one that definitely doesn't.

I have a few more projects planned, including a croap w/ shea butter, and a shaving cream.

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 03-02-2014, 12:21 AM
#8
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Well, I ended up making some soap less the silk and lanolin as well as some minor tweaking of the percentages. It turned out well, excellent soap, I'm very pleased with it, nice lather, stable, long lasting. I'm sure it could offer slightly more glide but I don't have much frame of reference here, it's better than the Bay Rum is was replacing.

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 03-02-2014, 10:55 PM
#9
  • Nero
  • Spending my way to profitability
  • le montagne
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(03-02-2014, 12:21 AM)TucsonAZ Wrote: Well, I ended up making some soap less the silk and lanolin as well as some minor tweaking of the percentages. It turned out well, excellent soap, I'm very pleased with it, nice lather, stable, long lasting. I'm sure it could offer slightly more glide but I don't have much frame of reference here, it's better than the Bay Rum is was replacing.

Good work! Can you post lather pictures? I'm curious to do this for myself someday.
Any idea on how to do a cream, too? Like, what makes it lather, if it's not saponified? (I'm also assuming saponification is what makes soap lather (I know it's what makes soap "soap")

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 03-03-2014, 01:52 PM
#10
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(03-02-2014, 10:55 PM)Nero Wrote: Any idea on how to do a cream, too? Like, what makes it lather, if it's not saponified? (I'm also assuming saponification is what makes soap lather (I know it's what makes soap "soap")

Huh A shaving cream is soap, and all soap is made of saponified oils. Oils are transformed into soap and glycerin by reacting them with lye. A cream soap has a different ratio of oils/additional glycerin/lye than other types of soap but it is made up of saponified oils, as all natural soaps are.

Not to be confused with a moisturizing cream, which is a blend of oils, water and emulsifiers, with various other cosmetic ingredients. Not saponified and no lather, just has the name "cream" in common.

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 03-04-2014, 03:43 PM
#11
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I've made a lot of soap. One suggestion would be to buy silk protein instead of trying to get good coverage by adding the silk to the lye.

Coconut while being excellent for hardness is fairly drying. I have recently tried adding beeswax (just a wee bit) for a more stabilizing bar of bath soap. I do like the results but this is a bar of wintertime soap for those of us with really dry skin.

Hardness will also depending on the amount of lye and the amount of water you add. And use distilled water then there is no crusty ring. I have made most every mistake so, if you'd like to know any more, please feel free to email me.
K

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 03-04-2014, 06:46 PM
#12
  • Nero
  • Spending my way to profitability
  • le montagne
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(03-03-2014, 01:52 PM)Mystic Water Wrote: what makes soap "soap")

Huh A shaving cream is soap, and all soap is made of saponified oils. Oils are transformed into soap and glycerin by reacting them with lye. A cream soap has a different ratio of oils/additional glycerin/lye than other types of soap but it is made up of saponified oils, as all natural soaps are.

Not to be confused with a moisturizing cream, which is a blend of oils, water and emulsifiers, with various other cosmetic ingredients. Not saponified and no lather, just has the name "cream" in common.

Thank you!
I thought that was the case originally, but somewhere along the way I read something (incorrect) that was contrary.

So what you are saying is: the only difference between a shaving soap and a shaving cream is that a shaving soap is hard and a shaving cream is malleable. Correct?

And therefore you could make one from the other, by adding or removing moisture (water, unsaponified oils, etc)?



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(03-04-2014, 03:43 PM)KLovgren Wrote: I've made a lot of soap. One suggestion would be to buy silk protein instead of trying to get good coverage by adding the silk to the lye.

Coconut while being excellent for hardness is fairly drying. I have recently tried adding beeswax (just a wee bit) for a more stabilizing bar of bath soap. I do like the results but this is a bar of wintertime soap for those of us with really dry skin.

Hardness will also depending on the amount of lye and the amount of water you add. And use distilled water then there is no crusty ring. I have made most every mistake so, if you'd like to know any more, please feel free to email me.
K

I love the honesty and especially the "continual learning and improvement" implied in your last paragraph.
A real man admits his mistakes openly AND fixes them. Bless you.


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