05-18-2013, 08:53 AM
#1
User Info
So my GF's cousin is in town and the GF is talking about going downtown and checking out the shops which overall is boring to me and I probably won't go but then she says they will probably check out some antique shops and of course I thought ..... hmmmmm perhaps a bargain straight can be found.

Are than any particular old time brands which are more desirable than others? Any to stick away from? Yeah, I know to check condition of the steel, do I like the scales etc, does the edge look like a bread knife ..... but I have no clue as far as branding.

A lil quick help would be appreciated as we literally will leave soon!

129 6,685
Reply
 05-18-2013, 09:26 AM
#2
  • Edson
  • Artisan Razor Restorer
  • Oregon
User Info
Branding makes no difference - just look for good steel. No/minimal rust. No deep pitting. No broken scales or overly warped scales. No major nicks in the edge. Absolutely no pitting near the edge.

If you are looking to resell - then brand might make more of a difference (W&B, Wostenholm, Joseph Rodgers, Dubl Duck, Puma, etc.).

But if looking to clean it up and shave - just make sure there are no major issues. And bargain with them on the price.

GL

11 185
Reply
 05-18-2013, 10:07 AM
#3
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
User Info
Doug,
Edson offers good advice. You can land a gem in an antique store, but then plenty of junk, too. So beware. Avoid razors with a skinny blade, say a 3/8, or even a 4/8, with an edge that has been tortured to death and that will need a lot of work. Remember, by the time you're through fixing the blade and removing steel, the bloody thing will look like a toothpick. As a rule in an antique shop or a flea market, I avoid anything smaller than a 5/8 with a blade fished out of a swamp.

132 2,614
Reply
 05-18-2013, 10:49 AM
#4
User Info
Both are excellent advice. I was asking about brand names as sometimes one finds gems, and perhaps even if I choose to keep it for myself the blade itself may be worth cleaning up and rescaling. If I stick with straights re-scaling may be something I start looking into.

129 6,685
Reply
 05-18-2013, 10:56 AM
#5
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
User Info
(05-18-2013, 10:49 AM)wingdo Wrote: Both are excellent advice. I was asking about brand names as sometimes one finds gems, and perhaps even if I choose to keep it for myself the blade itself may be worth cleaning up and rescaling. If I stick with straights re-scaling may be something I start looking into.
Other good names to look for, Doug, are Genco, Torrey, Top Flight, Luna, Shumate . . . Well, there are many others. If you come across a good one and are not familiar with the name, give me a quick telephone call. You have my number. Good luck.

132 2,614
Reply
 05-18-2013, 12:27 PM
#6
  • oscar11
  • Senior Member
  • North Dakota
User Info
Instead of brand names (there's just to many) it might be best to look for anything made in the US, England, Sweden, France or Germany (Japan too).

12 743
Reply
 05-18-2013, 02:13 PM
#7
User Info
The straights that I have found in junk/antique shops that are actually in good condition tend to be the relatively newer American made brands like Union Cutlery, Sterling, and Robeson, but like others have implied: most of the straight razors that have survived to this point and have good edges are probably going to be of good quality. There is a growing market for old straight razors, so as long as it looks to be in good condition then it will probably be a good buy.

Sent from my Transformer using Xparent Cyan Tapatalk 2

6 327
Reply
 05-18-2013, 05:06 PM
#8
User Info
Well ..... found nothing interesting. One very badly pitted straight and two "straight" razors which were really back of the neck shavers.

Ah well, thanks for the replies. Stupid hobby is giving me another thing to start collecting. 24

129 6,685
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)