05-28-2013, 05:21 PM
#1
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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[Image: nYGf5Xo.jpg]

I intend to purchase a Bialetti stovetop coffee maker,
but am hoping for some advice in terms of model and size selection...

I have an expensive espresso machine at home
and enjoy a mug size cappuccino every morning (with 3 strong shots).
More occasionally I enjoy an espresso as a digestive after a heavy meal.

A recent camping trip convinced me that I cannot live without coffee,
so I've decided a stovetop coffee maker is required for travel.

I like the traditional Bialetti Moka,
but am wondering if the extra investment for the Brikka is worthwhile.

I will be preparing coffee primarily for myself, but it's always nice to share...

I am happy with my choice of brand
and am prepared for a learning curve to the perfect shot,
but am unsure of size and model, any tips or advice?

[Image: H0ztLOh.jpg]

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 05-28-2013, 05:33 PM
#2
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I used one of them at home for a number of years. Mine was on the larger side and I wouldn't want to pack it in.

I switched to tea a number of years ago. Tea bags are much easier to carry than a coffee maker. When I was looking for one to take camping, I gave a lot of thought to something like the link below.

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___15773

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 05-28-2013, 05:43 PM
#3
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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Thanks for the link Dale.

I'm a tea drinker too, but no tea bags for me only authentic Chinese tea (Pu'er mainly) and using a Yixing pot...

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 05-28-2013, 05:50 PM
#4
  • MickToley
  • Hi, I'm Mike and I'm a shave soap addict
  • Brooklyn, NY
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I've always been intrigued by the brikka. But I've quit drinking coffee, loose leaf tea has taken its place.

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 05-28-2013, 06:30 PM
#5
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Well Ben,

I can't help you with that particular style of pot, But I have used a stove top percolator all my life. It was my grandparents and it's heavy and makes about 15 cups but it has traveled all over the world with me. Even through the Straights of Magellan on a 38 foot Ohlsen. They make much smaller and more portable versions that seem to do just as well. I don't do drip coffee Smile

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 05-28-2013, 06:36 PM
#6
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I'm considering the Bialetti Tuttocrema too...

[Image: K2NSRaQ.jpg]

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 05-29-2013, 02:50 AM
#7
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If you like the real "espresso" then the Moka may disappoint you, because it makes a waterish coffee with a very peculiar taste. If you're American, go for it Wink It makes a "long" coffee, not very concentrated,but not bad. In Italy there's not a single house without a Moka in it.

The smaller is enought for one or two normal servings. If you're American and drink a whole mug then go with the second from left.

Brikka makes a more espresso coffee, richer and more creamy but it's harder to use, so be prepared to clean your kitchen from the exploded coffee Biggrin

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 05-29-2013, 05:25 AM
#8
  • R.Shackleford
  • Either I've Lost a Horse or Found a Rope
  • Spring, TX
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(05-28-2013, 06:30 PM)Nickadermis Wrote: ...a stove top percolator all my life. It was my grandparents and it's heavy and makes about 15 cups...

I have used many stovetop / campfire percs over the years, most of which were family hand-me-downs or something you might see in an antique shop (or even an army surplus / camping store). They all make a great cup of coffee (for my tastes), but the real trick is learning your ratio of water to grounds. Campfire coffee will get stronger the longer you cook it, so it's all up to you. I like my coffee strong enough to serve by the slice.

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 05-29-2013, 05:32 AM
#9
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-29-2013, 02:50 AM)MrDentini Wrote: If you like the real "espresso" then the Moka may disappoint you, because it makes a waterish coffee with a very peculiar taste. If you're American, go for it Wink It makes a "long" coffee, not very concentrated,but not bad. In Italy there's not a single house without a Moka in it.

The smaller is enought for one or two normal servings. If you're American and drink a whole mug then go with the second from left.

Brikka makes a more espresso coffee, richer and more creamy but it's harder to use, so be prepared to clean your kitchen from the exploded coffee Biggrin

Thanks Marco, I've read that using sparkling water instead of still in the Moka can aid in achieving crema... ? A watery coffee is not something that will satisfy me. I like a rich, robust shot.

I'm guessing the second from the left may be the 3 cup version... ?

I'll predominately be using it outdoors (camping) so the risk of exploding I can take. I believe a trick to success with the Brikka may be to turn the heat source off as soon as the pressure has been reached... ?

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 05-29-2013, 05:40 AM
#10
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(05-29-2013, 05:32 AM)ben74 Wrote: Thanks Marco, I've read that using sparkling water instead of still in the Moka can aid in achieving crema... ?

Not sure about this.

(05-29-2013, 05:32 AM)ben74 Wrote: I'm guessing the second from the left may be the 3 cup version... ?


Exactly.

(05-29-2013, 05:32 AM)ben74 Wrote: I believe a trick to success with the Brikka may be to turn the heat source off as soon as the pressure has been reached... ?

Yesss, you're are perfectly ready for a good coffee Wink

Also the coffee grinding is a variable you have to take into account for a good cream.

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 05-29-2013, 05:48 AM
#11
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-29-2013, 05:40 AM)MrDentini Wrote: Also the coffee grinding is a variable you have to take into account for a good cream.

A grind almost as fine as for espresso?

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 05-29-2013, 06:00 AM
#12
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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For years and years my Mom used a regular percolator coffee maker until she got very old then started drinking instant coffee. The old
inexpensive Wherever percolators were the best and US made.

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 05-29-2013, 06:06 AM
#13
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(05-29-2013, 05:48 AM)ben74 Wrote: A grind almost as fine as for espresso?

That. The finest you can get before the thing explodes Biggrin

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 05-29-2013, 07:14 AM
#14
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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If it won't make at a minimum 10 cups, it is a waste of my time. I'm referring to regular coffee, none of the fancy drinks.

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 05-29-2013, 08:27 AM
#15
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When I travel I bring a french press (which is what that looks like) a grinder and an electric kettle. I don't want for good coffee but when I get home I realize how much I've missed the luxury of my espresso machine. The moka pot will make a bitter, though strong, cup of coffee but nothing that resembles what I consider to be a good shot of espresso.
(05-28-2013, 06:36 PM)ben74 Wrote: I'm considering the Bialetti Tuttocrema too...

[Image: K2NSRaQ.jpg]

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 10-25-2013, 04:00 AM
#16
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I purchased the Bialetti Brikka (4 cup) and the Bialetti Tuttocrema.

I am camping with my eldest son next weekend and am looking forward to using them then.

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 10-25-2013, 05:14 AM
#17
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(10-25-2013, 04:00 AM)ben74 Wrote: I purchased the Bialetti Brikka (4 cup) and the Bialetti Tuttocrema.

I am camping with my eldest son next weekend and am looking forward to using them then.

Have a great trip Ben. I look forward to hearing which coffee maker you go with and how the coffee (and trip) turn out.

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 10-25-2013, 08:14 AM
#18
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We've had real good success with the Aeropress.

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 10-25-2013, 08:28 AM
#19
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Ben, for what it's worth........ have been a user of Bailetti StoveTop coffee maker (the three cup version) in the 25+ years I have only ever bought two.

I do not sterilise this as I only use one blend of coffee "Blue Montain" in a small coffee can. If I were to change blend or brand I would purchase another.

Charles U.K

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 10-28-2013, 06:53 AM
#20
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I have been using a Brikka for the last 5 years and have never had an issue. If coffee is getting all over the kitchen, there is either a manufacturer's defect or user error. Go back and read the instructions and give it another go. I think you might have to tighten the valve on the top piece. just hold the bottom piece of the valve and turn the top valve piece clockwise. The Brikka only generates two bars of pressure, so no explosion should ever occurr! Also, do not tamp your ground espresso! Let me know if this helps with your Brikka!

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