06-10-2013, 08:02 PM
#1
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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I must admit it took some courage to upload this video, but here it is. Don't be to harsh on me, and for some reason the video is rotated the wrong way, I blame my significant other for that. I tried to keep it short to keep everyone from having to look at my ugly jug to long. Any help is appreciatd. Also, not the greatest shave(probably one of the worst since I have started) as I was very nervous doing this. On the bright side there was only one weeper on the right side of my face. Maybe I can get a better video with the shave tomorrow night.









Second video is of me just trying to get a decent palm lather.

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 06-10-2013, 08:12 PM
#2
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Tony, i don't get an image when i click on the video. i just get a message reading: "This video is private."

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 06-10-2013, 08:14 PM
#3
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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(06-10-2013, 08:12 PM)celestino Wrote: Tony, i don't get an image when i click on the video. i just get a message reading: "This video is private."

Sorry for some reason the video was marked private. My first youtube video as well.

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 06-10-2013, 08:23 PM
#4
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That lather doesn't look bad at all. I'll watch the other vid in the morning. Now I'm getting ready for bed.

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 06-10-2013, 08:30 PM
#5
  • TRBeck
  • Unregistered
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I think you might do well to slow down your blade strokes a bit. Make sure the angle is exactly where you want it and make one good, clean, steady stroke over an area, then move on. At times your first pass looks a bit like blade buffing and you are shaving some spots with several strokes on each pass,

One other thing, and this is personal preference, but I start with a bit wetter brush than you and make a fairly wet, slick lather. With a good soap such as Cella, even very wet lather will have ample cushion, and you'll get a bit more glide this way. I think a lot of guys make dry lather based on pics and videos I've seen, at least for my taste, but that's a personal preference issue.

Like the brush, btw. Very nice.

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 06-10-2013, 08:31 PM
#6
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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IMHO, lather doesn't look that bad at all. What I see is that you flick your wrist and your angle is a little steep, but if it works for you, don't change it.

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 06-10-2013, 08:35 PM
#7
  • TRBeck
  • Unregistered
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I should add that really, nothing looks "wrong" here, but since you asked for help improving, I made a couple of small suggestions. Your shave seems fine, and it only has to work for one person: you.

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 06-10-2013, 08:37 PM
#8
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God it takes you a long time to shave. 1. Idea : use a scuttle or a shave mug. With a soft soap just gouge out a finger full add press it into the bottom of the mug. A lot faster. 2. Lather should be wetter. 3. Are you using a WTG , then XTG, then a ATG ??
Other than your bathroom being too neat, I don't see a problem.

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 06-10-2013, 08:41 PM
#9
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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Beck, sometimes I feel that all I am doing is buffing. I have always though longer strokes were no good though.

Johnus, yes it takes me forever to shave. I have worked it down to about 20 minutes to shave and do all the touching up. As for the bathroom being to neat, my wife is a cleaning freakBiggrin
And yes, my beard grows all directions. I am doing WTG, XTG, and then ATG. I can never get any stubble off my neck it seems unless I go ATG on it.

Beartrap, any suggestions on how to keep from flipping my wrist?

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 06-10-2013, 08:46 PM
#10
  • TRBeck
  • Unregistered
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I don't do really long strokes, but some of those are very short, less than half an inch. Other than the chin, I think you can get away with longer strokes. Really, though, looks like a damn fine shave.

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 06-10-2013, 09:40 PM
#11
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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I too would have gone with a bit more water and worked the lather longer, it still looked good though. I wouldn't worry about what is perceived as taking too much time, part of this way of shaving is the experience.
I've gone from 45-50 minutes when started 2 years ago to 15-20 minutes now and I am perfectly happy with that amount of time, if you're going to rush it you might as well use canned goo and a disposable.

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 06-10-2013, 10:42 PM
#12
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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I will echo the three things that stood out that go against my preferences. More water in the lather will make for a slicker shave (less likely for the blade to catch skin and cause damage), your blade angle was too steep, try holding the handle closer to a 45 degree angle to the skin you are shaving (this is not exact as each razor is different, but you want the actual cutting edge of the blade to be at a very low angle in relation to your face) and finally do not go over an area multiple times without relathering, you might get away with two strokes without irritation because of residual lather but after that you are asking for trouble and with the proper angle and a sharp blade those extra strokes aren't doing anything productive to a good shave. Keep practicing and thanks for sharing a video, you are closer to an irritation-free BBS than we make it sound.

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 06-11-2013, 04:45 AM
#13
  • VT_Hokie
  • 2-Band Bandito
  • Charleston, SC
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Lather in the bottom video is way dehydrated. You need substantially more water and more time working it.

You are, however, on the right path with it. You're already miles ahead of many.

Don't be so timid when you're loading your brush. Load the soap like you literally hate it and just want to use it up. It took you 1:30 to load the same amount of soap into that brush that I usually do in about 10 seconds and I'm fully loaded and caked by 30 seconds. For all the time you spent gently swirling, you didn't come away with a lot of soap to show for it. Get in there and get nasty with it!

Instead of squeezing out the brush, I'd recommend just a few shakes and leave the brush slightly damper. I personally shake mine out pretty well, but I also run water on top of the soap before I load to add a little more moisture. Either way works, but the point is that you need a little more water at the start.

See this photo? This is what you want your brush to look like when you're done loading. Completely caked up with moist soap solids.

[Image: DSC00326_zps62d4dd38.jpg]

I posted this video before, but I don't know if you've seen it. It's done with TFS which is a croap very similar in consistency to Cella and I think there's some good info in there for you.




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 06-11-2013, 05:25 AM
#14
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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Thanks for your video Matt and all the other suggestions that everyone has posted. I will try more water tonight, along with looking for the proper blade angle as someone suggested. I guess the reason I started loading so slow was from reading a post about you needing to start off slow with a west brush( I think I read this by Marco on B&B). I have also noticed others starting to load a brush slowly. My other question is, when you load, do you fan the brush out at all?

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 06-11-2013, 05:39 AM
#15
  • VT_Hokie
  • 2-Band Bandito
  • Charleston, SC
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(06-11-2013, 05:25 AM)tsimmns Wrote: Thanks for your video Matt and all the other suggestions that everyone has posted. I will try more water tonight, along with looking for the proper blade angle as someone suggested. I guess the reason I started loading so slow was from reading a post about you needing to start off slow with a west brush( I think I read this by Marco on B&B). I have also noticed others starting to load a brush slowly. My other question is, when you load, do you fan the brush out at all?

Loading the brush slow would be a very good idea when you use the "Marco Method" Basically he turned people on to the idea of using a completely sopping wet boar brush to load soaps and croaps with, the idea being that tons of water and soap right from the start will net you a lot of wet lather later. If you tried to go after and attack a soap with a sopping wet brush, it's just going to foam up like crazy and fly everywhere.

That doesn't apply to us though. We're using a damp Badger with enough water to load, but not enough to make our soaps foam up.

When I load, my brush does flare out a bit. I actually put a little bit of pressure on when I load to get the soap a little deeper down into my brush. My the time I'm almost finished loading, you can hear the soap getting ripped up and it becomes hard to swirl the brush because I have so many solids built up in it.

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 06-11-2013, 05:42 AM
#16
  • TRBeck
  • Unregistered
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Matt, great video and explanation. I am an admirer of the Marco method, too, although my friend Zach was talking up this method some years ago and was shouted down at the time. Any path that leads to a wet, voluminous lather is a good path IMO.

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 06-11-2013, 12:06 PM
#17
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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(06-11-2013, 05:39 AM)VT_Hokie Wrote:
(06-11-2013, 05:25 AM)tsimmns Wrote: Thanks for your video Matt and all the other suggestions that everyone has posted. I will try more water tonight, along with looking for the proper blade angle as someone suggested. I guess the reason I started loading so slow was from reading a post about you needing to start off slow with a west brush( I think I read this by Marco on B&B). I have also noticed others starting to load a brush slowly. My other question is, when you load, do you fan the brush out at all?

Loading the brush slow would be a very good idea when you use the "Marco Method" Basically he turned people on to the idea of using a completely sopping wet boar brush to load soaps and croaps with, the idea being that tons of water and soap right from the start will net you a lot of wet lather later. If you tried to go after and attack a soap with a sopping wet brush, it's just going to foam up like crazy and fly everywhere.

That doesn't apply to us though. We're using a damp Badger with enough water to load, but not enough to make our soaps foam up.

When I load, my brush does flare out a bit. I actually put a little bit of pressure on when I load to get the soap a little deeper down into my brush. My the time I'm almost finished loading, you can hear the soap getting ripped up and it becomes hard to swirl the brush because I have so many solids built up in it.

Matt,

The day has me on pins and needles to get home and shave tonight. While I will keep yall from having to watch my ugly jug do a painful shave, I will take some pictures of my lather after loading. For that might I might just try a palm lather and upload that video. It also appears after watching your videos over and over that you use a ton of water while dipping the brush in there. I've just always been cautious of doing such things like this as I have always thought it would kill the soap I had on there. Tonight I think I will actually see how much water is to much water.

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 06-11-2013, 12:13 PM
#18
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I also picked up from Matt's videos to use a bit more water when wetting my brush as I build the lather. After rewatching your lather video on my desktop I will agree that it's dehydrated. I agree with everything that Matt has said because we tend to lather quite similarly. I also believe that you can get to your lather in different ways so experiment a lot doing palm lathers to find not only what works but what you enjoy doing to get there. I never squeeze my brush anymore to get water out. I only squeeze it at the very end to get most of the lather out before I rinse the brush out and dry it off.

Keep practicing. It's only lather and it's a lot of fun to play with. Finding out what works for you now is worth so much more for you down the road than the pennies of lather rinsing down the drain now.

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 06-11-2013, 12:34 PM
#19
  • VT_Hokie
  • 2-Band Bandito
  • Charleston, SC
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(06-11-2013, 12:06 PM)tsimmns Wrote: I've just always been cautious of doing such things like this as I have always thought it would kill the soap I had on there. Tonight I think I will actually see how much water is to much water.

Do it. Kill the lather.

Make yourself a beautiful palm lather and just keep adding water.

You'll reach a point where you go...holy smokes, this is amazing. But don't stop there.

Keep adding water and you'll find that the lather will thin out, lose it's slickness and eventually break down.

The point is that in the end, you'll be surprised at how much water your lather can actually take before it breaks.

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