06-11-2013, 12:51 PM
#1
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
User Info
Is it for me? I am relatively new to wet shaving using my Merkur 34C so I'm wondering if using a straight razor might be for me. The logic behind my thinking is fewer passes than a DE razor, which might in the long run be better for my skin.

Can any of you veteran straight users give me sound advice on what a good quality starting straight razor would be? I have watched some videos on straight razors and love the way the full-hollow Dovo ones sound when cutting, but I have no idea if they would be ideal for someone starting out.

I guess what I'm getting at is if you had to start at nothing like I would be, what would you recommend and where would you recommend me to start looking out. Thanks in advance for the help.

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 06-11-2013, 02:31 PM
#2
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
User Info
Start here:

http://straightrazorplace.com/srpwiki/in...Place_Wiki

Read everything.

If you skin is smooth, beard not very coarse, you have more time to spend on each shave then you do now, you like tools and maintaining them, you are patient and open to learning technique, basic honing and proper stropping then you are a candidate for a straight.

Shaving with a straight is not a one pass and done shave. You will need to take short strokes like a DE, you will have to get used to holding the blade, you may find some parts of your face very hard to get at (upper lip, chin and neck) and you will have to deal with an edge which is not as sharp as any disposable blade. It may be more than sharp enough for your beard and therefore will provide an excellent shave, but if you find only the sharpest DE blades work in you Merkur, then your prep will have to improve greatly as the straight edge will have significantly more problems cutting your beard.

Not trying to discourage you, just giving you the facts as I have experienced them straight shaving. Good luck.

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 06-11-2013, 04:26 PM
#3
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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Thank you for this. I am going to head over to straight razor place and have a look around at some point.

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 06-12-2013, 09:54 AM
#4
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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matloffm pretty much nailed it right there, great post

I never understand the connection people make between being a DE shaver making them a better candidate for straight shaving than anyone else. It might just be me, but I've been happily using a straight for a few years now, but could never get the hang of using a DE without major irritation. Tried it once years ago, went back to modern razors. Went from that to straights, then tried DE again about a year ago, and gave up again after a few weeks. I had the idea that a DE would be good in case of travel or something.....ended up buying a Feather SS instead lol

As far as grinds, you really won't know what you like till you try them for yourself. I'd suggest starting with something in the middle, rather than a full hollow. Start with something that has a nice rounded point. And start with a professionally honed blade.
I started with a square point and learning to hone myself....and I've got the scars to prove it (on my face and on my ego hahaha)

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 06-12-2013, 09:56 AM
#5
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
User Info
(06-12-2013, 09:54 AM)Kavik79 Wrote: matloffm pretty much nailed it right there, great post

I never understand the connection people make between being a DE shaver making them a better candidate for straight shaving than anyone else. It might just be me, but I've been happily using a straight for a few years now, but could never get the hang of using a DE without major irritation. Tried it once years ago, went back to modern razors. Went from that to straights, then tried DE again about a year ago, and gave up again after a few weeks. I had the idea that a DE would be good in case of travel or something.....ended up buying a Feather SS instead lol

As far as grinds, you really won't know what you like till you try them for yourself. I'd suggest starting with something in the middle, rather than a full hollow. Start with something that has a nice rounded point. And start with a professionally honed blade.
I started with a square point and learning to hone myself....and I've got the scars to prove it (on my face and on my ego hahaha)

Thanks Daryl. There is a lot of information on the straight razor place and like DE shaving it is a lot to digest. I am just scared that trying a straight would leave me to chopping off part of my face that I can't live withoutSmile

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 06-12-2013, 10:29 AM
#6
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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(06-12-2013, 09:56 AM)tsimmns Wrote: Thanks Daryl. There is a lot of information on the straight razor place and like DE shaving it is a lot to digest. I am just scared that trying a straight would leave me to chopping off part of my face that I can't live withoutSmile

LOL it was a little nerve wracking the first time for me too. But as long as your careful I'm sure you'll be fine. I've had my share of nicks, and a couple slices, but I've honestly had more painful (and slower healing) cuts from a Mach III

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 06-12-2013, 11:04 AM
#7
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
Allow yourself time. That's time to learn your way around your face as well as time to get the shave done.

I've learned to treat the face like a series of puzzles. As you figure out how to navigate one section it becomes a piece to the big riddle of getting a good shave.

It won't come easy or cheap. But it's worth it.

Expect to make a few mistakes but short of dropping a razor and taking off a toe (or something else on the way down) you won't give yourself any irrecoverable injuries.

Grinds are very much personal preferences, like much of the aesthetics of a straight. That said, I do find the heavier grinds allow me to maintain more momentum due to overall weight. But that is a double edges sword (so to speak).

At this point I have learned what I like and am beginning the chore or thinning the herd. First to go are the light grinds and square tips.

Is it for you? Couldn't tell you. Only way to know is commit to a month or two to learn. Shorter then that and you won't have the benefit of a good shave for sake of comparison.

I say, give it a try..


Sent from East of Montauk

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