06-22-2013, 04:57 PM
#1
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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Below is a linked report from my town. Since I know nothing about water reading maybe some of you hard water experts can determine by this if my water is classified as hard as not. By the way, this is the only report or anything I can find about my water from my city. Thanks in advance.

http://www.tupeloms.gov/twl/files/2010/0...eport1.pdf

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 06-22-2013, 05:04 PM
#2
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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That is only a report of contaminants and water drinking quality and does not contain an actual hardness level. Your best bet is to call your local water company office and ask them for the average hardness of the local water or invest in a inexpensive water testing kit and find out for yourself.

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 06-22-2013, 05:09 PM
#3
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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Thanks arcadies. I have found other maps, but I am not sure how accurate they are. Seeing as from those maps how me and Sharpspine both say yellow(3-7 grains) I know they are off as he always says his is around 12 grains. I'm thinking like you said they best way for this information is just call the water department and find out.

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 06-22-2013, 05:53 PM
#4
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I called my local water authority & that is how I got my information. We get our water from a different source apparently than other regions near by.

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 11-21-2013, 08:55 AM
#5
  • Coyote
  • Senior Member
  • Hondo, TX USA
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I know I have hard water. I decided to test it today anyway using a free test strip from Morton: http://www.mortonsalt.com/for-your-home/test-your-water

You can also get these from most water softener companies just for the asking.

Yep, it is hard! Yep, slow day for me.......Biggrin

I use a tsp of Baking Soda in my sink and 1/8 tsp in my brush bowl. I will also use Distilled Water occasionally.

[Image: DevineWaterHardness_zps4e61574e.jpg]

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 11-21-2013, 10:53 AM
#6
  • tsimmns
  • Senior Member
  • Mississippi
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That is terrible Bob. I know when I spent 4 months in Wichita Falls last year in the fall I noticed the water there was incredibly hard as well. I wonder if it's like that all over Texas. Thanks for taking the time to share and for the link to the strips. I am about to ask for my free strip to test mine at home.

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 11-21-2013, 11:54 AM
#7
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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For the 40 years I lived in the Dallas area we did not have hard water.

I am confused on one issue though. When I take a shower at my house and rinse off the soap, I am squeaky clean, but when I go to Madison and take a shower at my son's home, when I rinse off the soap I feel slimy. So, who has hard water, me or my son?

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 11-21-2013, 12:39 PM
#8
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(11-21-2013, 11:54 AM)Johnny Wrote: For the 40 years I lived in the Dallas area we did not have hard water.

I am confused on one issue though. When I take a shower at my house and rinse off the soap, I am squeaky clean, but when I go to Madison and take a shower at my son's home, when I rinse off the soap I feel slimy. So, who has hard water, me or my son?

* You do, Johnny! When showering in 'soft' water, it seems as though you can never get the soap off of your skin. Happens every single day, here, in Vancouver! Biggrin

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 11-21-2013, 12:47 PM
#9
  • Johnny
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  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Well, in that case we had hard water in Dallas and I guess I have hard water here. I did contact our water department last year and the answer I got was some call it medium soft and some call it medium hard. All I know is after a shower I am squeaky clean. But, I do not have any trouble making a good lather.

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 12-07-2013, 03:05 PM
#10
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As I understand the logic, soft water is harder on the pipes but feels better. Hard water is much easier on them (they last longer). Around here, we're right in the middle; I believe by design.

I'm curious myself as to why cities vary, or if I'm right.

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 12-07-2013, 08:01 PM
#11
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(12-07-2013, 03:05 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: As I understand the logic, soft water is harder on the pipes but feels better. Hard water is much easier on them (they last longer). Around here, we're right in the middle; I believe by design.

I'm curious myself as to why cities vary, or if I'm right.

Just the other way around Bob. When hard water heats up, the calcium comes out of it and coats the inside of pipes. Not so with soft water. Not many years ago I had some plumbing done and the gent doing it asked how long we'd had our home. At that time it was about 25 years. He was astounded. There was no corrosion, and no build up in any of the fittings. He told me he was going to reuse what he could and did.

Where I was raised in NJ we had a true artesian well system in town. A true artesian meaning drill a weel, hit the aquifer and you don't even need a pump, the water comes shooting up out of the ground. It's a underground limestone cavern that acts like an aquaduct for water falling hundreds of miles away. The water was hard and I never felt clean. Soap rinsed off great (it actually didn't but it felt that way becasue the soap didn't want to lather). When we moved to where we are today the water comes out of granite so there's no calcium. The water is extremely soft, lathers easily, and seems to take forever to rinse off, but when it is off there's no film left on the skin.

Why would one city have soft water and one hard? One might be using water from limestone. Another might be using surface water that doesn't contact limestone (rain water is soft), or use ground water from out of rock where limestone isn't present.

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 12-08-2013, 11:52 AM
#12
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Thanks Brian. Makes sense to me.

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