07-11-2013, 07:24 AM
#1
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I thought a running chat about brush designs You Personally would like to see in the future would be a good thing to have.

Brushes are one area where the Brush Makers have a lot of creativity available and now that wet shaving is really taking off it seems to me that we might have a little too much tradition in the market place.

Some fresh perspective is never a bad thing to have around.

A Marilyn Monroe Edition dedicated to JFK would be nice though. "Happy Birthday Mr. President".

Make me the swankest Blue and Orange 2 Bander "At the Sands" Edition Honoring "The Chairman".

Or one for Franks greatest rival, "The Beatles" in Multicolor and a Peace Symbol on the base of the handle.

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 07-11-2013, 11:17 AM
#2
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Shaving brush popularity is very cyclical.

There are more artisan brush makers around now which makes the market place seem very busy but I would say that popularity is not as high now as it was a few decades back when shaving options weren't as varied as now (electric shaving, canned goo, etc).

When traditional barber shops were the 'go to' establishment (much like heading for a haircut) there was a certain 'core' series of brush designs to accommodate the needs of the professional barber. Handles were light coloured for various reasons-natural colour of hardy materials available for turning (ivory and bone being good examples), visual assurance of 'clean' equipment, etc.

As barber shop clients started shaving at home, rather than at the salon, personal preferences started to appear (as can be seen today with you guys asking for custom builds)-handle changes, loft set, hair type, knot shape, density...

Simpsons to begin with had a very small core range of brush designs which were available for sale. The focus was always on producing the very best quality to each individual brush-no brush was dispatched without passing through the hands of either Great Uncle Alex, Grandad or my Dad (the boss had the final say). Gradually over the decades new handle designs were added (and removed) depending on current trends but the core range stayed the course. Different materials were tried.

The number of brush designs available nowadays have taken decades to emerge but their roots all come from a handful of core designs.

The move away from hand turned brushes for the big players has limited to a certain extent the creativity-if you look at individual artisan brush makers they tend to be able to express themselves on the lathe more. Customer demand for quick production turnaround has forced the hand of the bigger companies, in my humble opinion, to use CNC lathes over the traditional hand turning methods.

The number of handle designs available today is a fraction of those once produced. Our family design sketch/idea book contains pages of brushes either never to have seen the light of day or taken out of production because of lack of demand/change in preference. All designs created by my family over many years. It must be a genetic thing that has been passed down the line!

Watch this space guys as there may well be a short return to the world of hand turned/hand tied brushes for this 'old Simpson'. Maybe i can kick start the family gene and draw up some ideas? I look at the brushes the artisan makers are turning and it reminds me of the satisfaction I felt. I miss it...

Gary

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 07-11-2013, 01:51 PM
#3
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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I wouldn't mind seeing a few small tweaks of some existing stuff.
Out comes the short-list ! Can't say how "fresh" the perspective is.......but here goes.

Maybe an existing Semogue Premium knot, a couple of m/m shorter, in a solid color, all acrylic handle that approximates the basic shape that Semogue uses in their 1305 type-handles, enlarged in diameter by no more than 1 1/2-2 m/m. One other guy who lives in East Overshoe and myself might like one. pretty basic stuff.

Keeping eyes peeled for a "possible" (?) Simpson boar ? Handle ?...surprise me !

doesn't have to be "special edition" to make the cut for me.
I mostly want solid, everyday performance and quality.

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 07-11-2013, 01:59 PM
#4
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(07-11-2013, 11:17 AM)Gary Young Wrote: Shaving brush popularity is very cyclical.

There are more artisan brush makers around now which makes the market place seem very busy but I would say that popularity is not as high now as it was a few decades back when shaving options weren't as varied as now (electric shaving, canned goo, etc).

When traditional barber shops were the 'go to' establishment (much like heading for a haircut) there was a certain 'core' series of brush designs to accommodate the needs of the professional barber. Handles were light coloured for various reasons-natural colour of hardy materials available for turning (ivory and bone being good examples), visual assurance of 'clean' equipment, etc.

As barber shop clients started shaving at home, rather than at the salon, personal preferences started to appear (as can be seen today with you guys asking for custom builds)-handle changes, loft set, hair type, knot shape, density...

Simpsons to begin with had a very small core range of brush designs which were available for sale. The focus was always on producing the very best quality to each individual brush-no brush was dispatched without passing through the hands of either Great Uncle Alex, Grandad or my Dad (the boss had the final say). Gradually over the decades new handle designs were added (and removed) depending on current trends but the core range stayed the course. Different materials were tried.

The number of brush designs available nowadays have taken decades to emerge but their roots all come from a handful of core designs.

The move away from hand turned brushes for the big players has limited to a certain extent the creativity-if you look at individual artisan brush makers they tend to be able to express themselves on the lathe more. Customer demand for quick production turnaround has forced the hand of the bigger companies, in my humble opinion, to use CNC lathes over the traditional hand turning methods.

The number of handle designs available today is a fraction of those once produced. Our family design sketch/idea book contains pages of brushes either never to have seen the light of day or taken out of production because of lack of demand/change in preference. All designs created by my family over many years. It must be a genetic thing that has been passed down the line!

Watch this space guys as there may well be a short return to the world of hand turned/hand tied brushes for this 'old Simpson'. Maybe i can kick start the family gene and draw up some ideas? I look at the brushes the artisan makers are turning and it reminds me of the satisfaction I felt. I miss it...

Gary

An exciting proposition Gary! I'd be lining up (along with many others no doubt) for the chance to own a hand made brush by Gary Young!

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 07-11-2013, 02:08 PM
#5
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Ben

You know my thoughts on copied designs and the 'personal' aspect of those thoughts, so I do have an idea that might be of interest....

Real one offs...if someone has a personal design they might like developed and made I'd consider helping in the design process to bring their design to life. Then hand turn, or carve, and knot the brush. All traditionally made and completely bespoke.

Just one idea...

Gary

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 07-11-2013, 02:39 PM
#6
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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Gary, Gary, Gary, don't do this to me; I'm currently battling a bad case of SBAD and every time I think I have it beat I come across a brush I just have to have, e.g. Simpson's QE II Jubilee and the Simpson's TSN LE. Unfortunately, I come up short when it comes to design (which makes we wonder where my daughter, who is a highly acclaimed theatre costume and set designer, and my son, who is a successful sports photographer, got their talent from), but I do know what I like when I see it. When it comes to shaving brush handles I really admire the Simpson's Gary Young LE, Emperor, Beehive and Rover. I know that you don't want to copy existing styles, but I wanted to give you a sense of styles that turn my crank: as Hamlet said, "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy...". Mutatis mutandis.

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 07-11-2013, 03:00 PM
#7
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(07-11-2013, 11:17 AM)Gary Young Wrote: Watch this space guys as there may well be a short return to the world of hand turned/hand tied brushes for this 'old Simpson'. Maybe i can kick start the family gene and draw up some ideas? I look at the brushes the artisan makers are turning and it reminds me of the satisfaction I felt. I miss it...

Hi Gary

If you ever need a lackey to sweep the floor of the workshop and make the tea, I'm your lackey Biggrin

Take care, Mike

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 07-11-2013, 03:06 PM
#8
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(07-11-2013, 11:17 AM)Gary Young Wrote: Shaving brush popularity is very cyclical.

There are more artisan brush makers around now which makes the market place seem very busy but I would say that popularity is not as high now as it was a few decades back when shaving options weren't as varied as now (electric shaving, canned goo, etc).

When traditional barber shops were the 'go to' establishment (much like heading for a haircut) there was a certain 'core' series of brush designs to accommodate the needs of the professional barber. Handles were light coloured for various reasons-natural colour of hardy materials available for turning (ivory and bone being good examples), visual assurance of 'clean' equipment, etc.

As barber shop clients started shaving at home, rather than at the salon, personal preferences started to appear (as can be seen today with you guys asking for custom builds)-handle changes, loft set, hair type, knot shape, density...

Simpsons to begin with had a very small core range of brush designs which were available for sale. The focus was always on producing the very best quality to each individual brush-no brush was dispatched without passing through the hands of either Great Uncle Alex, Grandad or my Dad (the boss had the final say). Gradually over the decades new handle designs were added (and removed) depending on current trends but the core range stayed the course. Different materials were tried.

The number of brush designs available nowadays have taken decades to emerge but their roots all come from a handful of core designs.

The move away from hand turned brushes for the big players has limited to a certain extent the creativity-if you look at individual artisan brush makers they tend to be able to express themselves on the lathe more. Customer demand for quick production turnaround has forced the hand of the bigger companies, in my humble opinion, to use CNC lathes over the traditional hand turning methods.

The number of handle designs available today is a fraction of those once produced. Our family design sketch/idea book contains pages of brushes either never to have seen the light of day or taken out of production because of lack of demand/change in preference. All designs created by my family over many years. It must be a genetic thing that has been passed down the line!

Watch this space guys as there may well be a short return to the world of hand turned/hand tied brushes for this 'old Simpson'. Maybe i can kick start the family gene and draw up some ideas? I look at the brushes the artisan makers are turning and it reminds me of the satisfaction I felt. I miss it...

Gary

Form should follow function. In my mind it must fit the hand first and foremost. All other design aspects should by an extension of that principle. That is the reason why certain classic shapes stand the test of time, because they serve the hand that holds them so well.

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 07-11-2013, 03:12 PM
#9
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One reason I got to thinking about this has less to do with shape and more to do with resin choices. Although the thread is "For Both". Take a look at the paint Harley is currently using.

[Image: aijn.jpg]
[Image: wvd6.jpg]
[Image: z45x.jpg]

Being lathe turned and Beige used to be ok. And to be honest, a lot of pretty bikes are ruined because the average person usually comes up with the same answer time and time again,,... "Black".

Its true with brushes too. Its 2013 not 1961.

Wiborg has picked up on it. How many different resins, painted acrylics, woods, combinations, can be used on one shape?

x How many shapes?

How often are Semogue, Simpsons, Penworks, Rudy, and all the others making something using an idea from a group or individual?

Picture Semogue SOC Handles turned in Acrylic with knot rings anodized in bright colors and Anodized Semogue Logo Medallions imbedded in the base of the handles and Boar dyed to look like finest?

Or one of those ideas or two of those ideas? On a 740 handle with Finest 2-Band,,...

All they need do is read this thread for stuff that "Customers Want to Buy".

Popular ideas will draw attention and not always cost a lot to make.

Some colors preferred for painting the recess when putting knots in acrylic.

Perhaps a different resin could replace straight black in some of the permanent line-ups eg: W. S. P. Or Vulfix.

Dark Grey with Gold writing looks good.

Blah, Blah, Blah,,... Smile

B

As far as I'm concerned, copying is SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).

How much input or "Inspiration" are Brush Makers taking from individuals, group buys, and models long gone,,...

What I am getting at is "We can collaborate". Maybe a mod could put some ground rules in the first post if they want.

We have a thread like this for imaginary stuff, why not have one for collaborating on real stuff too?

I just wanna see the stuff come to fruition in the occasional picture. If its sitting in someone else's den or show case I don't care.

B

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 07-18-2013, 09:47 PM
#10
  • LORDBISHOP
  • Lover of the Wet Shaving way of Life
  • Westchester, NY
User Info
Genius ThreadLightbulb I enjoy the new designs/materials that pop up, new tweaks to old designs, and of course the plain ol classic designs. This creates the World of brushes as a whole...I love my classic brushes, and appreciate the time, expertise, and individual differences between brushes of the same model and manufacture. That is why I love Simpson as a Brand...Everybody who has been able to look at a nice size stock of these brushes in person and compare supposed "identical" model brushes side by side...quickly realizes that literally every brush has its own unique character...slightly differing knots, hair, and even unique lettering on each handle. Each handle has its own slight differences too, again when comparing the same model brushes with one another. The stories attached to designs like the "Major", "Colonel", "Wee Scot" make those brushes unique in numerous ways...Those were innovative designs for the time and are still cool today! Now, as with the "candy painted" Harley D.'s, brush designs can and should adapt to the times...Amazing materials exist today in 2013 that no one could have dreamed of using in the 20's - 80's...also with World wide commerce and communication ramped up(thanks Internet), we are able to have the opportunity to find unique and special grades of hair, materials and the ability to literally speak with brush producers. I want to keep seeing both the hand turned/designed "Classics", as well as awesome tweaks like the "Disc Haze Hive". Also now that I've discovered the custom section of Shavemac, I hope that brush makers continue to offer custom brushes that allow personalized touches and designs.
On another note...Gary I truly enjoy reading your posts and unique perspective on the history of shave brushes (& more)...I'm all for another unique designer who can help maintain IMHO the best part of my beloved classic brushesThumbup
-BB

OK so Shavemac's options are cool, but holy moley WIBORG...I hope I hear from Mark at Simpson on ordering a custom brush before scoring one of these Sweet looking babies from Wiborg! What to doHuh

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 07-18-2013, 11:38 PM
#11
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Those "Hive" and "Persian" models recently posted under Limited Edition on the Simpsons website were beautiful!

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 07-26-2013, 04:16 AM
#12
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Been looking at Thaters and Shavemacs and the whole thing is devoid of any character whatsoever.

I read in a couple places that the Duke (#2 if I'm not mistaken) is very popular with the face lathering crowd.

I started looking at the Simpsons "Best" line up and realized the "Fifty Series" brushes used a knot configuration similar to the Duke.

I really like the 59 brush as it has a nice knot and it has a "Nice Big Handle".

So I was thinkin,,... What If Simpsons were to make a 59 with a Manchurian 2-Band knot and use the Stripped Ivory or Amber rod stock recently used in the Limited Edition "Hive" brushes listed on the Simpsons website.

This
[Image: ofbp.jpg]

Plus This
[Image: ql2b.jpg]

Or This
[Image: 7c7l.jpg]

I also like the Persian but the guys at Simpsons just finished a batch of Limited Persians.

So what do you think of the "Limited Edition 59" idea?

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 07-26-2013, 09:15 AM
#13
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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The Simpson's handle I've taken a shine to recently is the M7. It has a classic, " old school" look to it, which I find very attractive; however, some people may not like it because of this.

The LE 59 is appealing too. It has more than a passing resemblance to the M7.

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 07-26-2013, 11:16 AM
#14
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You know Rufus, I couldn't agree more.

I never seem to "Think of the M7". I'm not sure why, maybe because I don't see many people using them or because I don't see many places selling them.

Is the M7 a newer model or and older unit brought back from another era?

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 07-26-2013, 11:25 AM
#15
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(07-26-2013, 11:16 AM)olblueyez Wrote: You know Rufus, I couldn't agree more.

I never seem to "Think of the M7". I'm not sure why, maybe because I don't see many people using them or because I don't see many places selling them.

Is the M7 a newer model or and older unit brought back from another era?

It is one of my family's earliest designs. One of the original line up. It is the brush that produced the two offspring-Tulip & Emperor.

Gary

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 07-26-2013, 12:12 PM
#16
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(07-26-2013, 11:25 AM)Gary Young Wrote:
(07-26-2013, 11:16 AM)olblueyez Wrote: You know Rufus, I couldn't agree more.

I never seem to "Think of the M7". I'm not sure why, maybe because I don't see many people using them or because I don't see many places selling them.

Is the M7 a newer model or and older unit brought back from another era?

It is one of my family's earliest designs. One of the original line up. It is the brush that produced the two offspring-Tulip & Emperor.

Gary

And its still cool today!

Say Gary, what rod stocks do you have that would be appropriate for a custom 59?

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 07-26-2013, 12:32 PM
#17
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(07-26-2013, 12:12 PM)olblueyez Wrote:
(07-26-2013, 11:25 AM)Gary Young Wrote:
(07-26-2013, 11:16 AM)olblueyez Wrote: You know Rufus, I couldn't agree more.

I never seem to "Think of the M7". I'm not sure why, maybe because I don't see many people using them or because I don't see many places selling them.

Is the M7 a newer model or and older unit brought back from another era?

It is one of my family's earliest designs. One of the original line up. It is the brush that produced the two offspring-Tulip & Emperor.

Gary

And its still cool today!

Say Gary, what rod stocks do you have that would be appropriate for a custom 59?

You will have to ask Mark. None of the family are involved with the business nowadays.

Gary

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 07-26-2013, 12:49 PM
#18
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(07-26-2013, 12:32 PM)Gary Young Wrote:
(07-26-2013, 12:12 PM)olblueyez Wrote:
(07-26-2013, 11:25 AM)Gary Young Wrote: It is one of my family's earliest designs. One of the original line up. It is the brush that produced the two offspring-Tulip & Emperor.

Gary

And its still cool today!

Say Gary, what rod stocks do you have that would be appropriate for a custom 59?

You will have to ask Mark. None of the family are involved with the business nowadays.

Gary

Thanks Gary!

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 07-27-2013, 12:41 AM
#19
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I wasn't aware that the Tulip and Emperor were based off the M7 handle... Gary, your sharing of knowledge and family history is irreplaceable.

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 07-27-2013, 04:08 AM
#20
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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(07-27-2013, 12:41 AM)cessnabird Wrote: I wasn't aware that the Tulip and Emperor were based off the M7 handle... Gary, your sharing of knowledge and family history is irreplaceable.

I like it that Gary willingly shares the family history, but what he's done now is to heighten my lust for an M7. Such a piece of Simpson history just has to be mine...my precious.Biggrin

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