07-15-2013, 01:08 AM
#1
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Hi lads,Geordie Sam here, as I have said elsewhere on this site I use a fairly cheap brush (Wilkinson Sword Classic, £7 about $10) I have never used an expensive brush so can't give an opinion,but is it really worth splashing out a good few quid on a brush,please advise.
Thanks.
Sam.

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 07-15-2013, 01:22 AM
#2
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Sure is.

A good brush will help you build a proper lather, which is really important to protect you skin and help the blade slide and cut the hair smoothly. Exfoliation is also on the radar, specially if you face lather with a brush that has good backbone.

The options are endless (types of hair - badger, boar, horse, etc... , types of types of hair - badgers subdivide into silvertip, best, super, etc..., etc... ) and I won't go there now.

Very simply put, a good brush will help you do those things I mentioned up there more easily than bad ones, and will enhance your pleasure shaving, potentially tremendously.

Also, you don't have to spend very much to get an excellent brush. Check out, for instance, the SOC (Semogue Owners Club) Boar brush, which is one of the best boar brushes available in the market, and costs around 30 USD.

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 07-15-2013, 03:27 AM
#3
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(07-15-2013, 01:08 AM)geordie sam Wrote: Hi lads,Geordie Sam here, as I have said elsewhere on this site I use a fairly cheap brush (Wilkinson Sword Classic, £7 about $10) I have never used an expensive brush so can't give an opinion,but is it really worth splashing out a good few quid on a brush,please advise.
Thanks.
Sam.

Most definately, it's hard to quantify till you've tried one. If your in the UK check out new forest brushes. They are high end brushes at low cost prices. I have one and its great value.

(07-15-2013, 01:08 AM)geordie sam Wrote: Hi lads,Geordie Sam here, as I have said elsewhere on this site I use a fairly cheap brush (Wilkinson Sword Classic, £7 about $10) I have never used an expensive brush so can't give an opinion,but is it really worth splashing out a good few quid on a brush,please advise.
Thanks.
Sam.

Most definately, it's hard to quantify till you've tried one. If your in the UK check out new forest brushes. They are high end brushes at low cost prices. I have one and its great value.

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 07-15-2013, 04:13 AM
#4
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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For me, apart from the clean shaven satisfaction as the end result, the brush is the tool that provides me with the most enjoyment. The function of the brush is utilitarian, but there remains a sense of luxury about it. Building the lather and dispersing it about my face is for me the most enjoyable and rewarding aspect of shaving.

You don't necessarily need to invest a heap, but be warned that once you embark upon the quest to find the perfect brush, your budget justification will no doubt steadily increase.

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 07-15-2013, 04:29 AM
#5
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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Good advice on the New Forest brushes. I own two and they are both among my best. As to how important a brush is, it's very but up to a point they're worth the extra for a better one. After that you're really not getting an equal bang for your buck. What I mean is aesthetics take over at a certain point as the major part of the cost. Efficiency -wise, a $300 brush is not twice as good as a $150 one, which is not twice as good as a $75 one. If you just want to make lather that you can get a great shave with, a boar will work great in the hands of someone who knows how to use it.
That said....I'll pay anything I possibly can to get a brush that pulls at me.

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 07-15-2013, 04:48 AM
#6
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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(07-15-2013, 04:13 AM)ben74 Wrote: For me, apart from the clean shaven satisfaction as the end result, the brush is the tool that provides me with the most enjoyment. The function of the brush is utilitarian, but there remains a sense of luxury about it. Building the lather and dispersing it about my face is for me the most enjoyable and rewarding aspect of shaving.

You don't necessarily need to invest a heap, but be warned that once you embark upon the quest to find the perfect brush, your budget justification will no doubt steadily increase.

+1. To me the best part of my morning shave is the lathering. I lather exclusively on my face and I love the feel of a good quality badger, or boar for that matter. The price of a brush is not an indication of how well you'll like it; as with anything, there is a point of diminishing returns. I have some outstanding brushes that I've paid a lot for, but I also have some outstanding brushes I haven't had to pay a great deal for. In my book, New Forest Brushes offers some of the best brushes, in terms of quality and performance, on the market at very reasonable prices. There are of course other brands out there that offer a good combination of quality and price.

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 07-15-2013, 04:52 AM
#7
  • Elbe
  • Member
  • Wolfsburg, Germany
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There are brush collectors buying brushes (and spending a fortune) just for the sake to satisfy their collector's passion. Nobody wanting a decent wet shave needs more than two or three brushes maximum. OK, it's nice to have more, but really you don't need them.

As said, a good brush helps a lot making a decent lather in contrast to a cheap drugstore brush. If you want a brush with a good backbone and a nice, soft face feel, easy lathering capabilities and a fast drying brush, then forget all badger and boar brushes and treat yourself a Mühle synthetic brush. It's all you ever need.

Yes, badger brushes are nice, they are collector's items, some are real pieces of art and until last year they were the king of the castle. But then Mühle entered the market with their new V2 Silver Tip Fibre, and from an utilitarian standpoint nothing can beat these new brushes.

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 07-15-2013, 05:47 AM
#8
  • u2u
  • Senior Member
  • GTA
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If your focus is the destination, the end point of being shaved, a basic brush is all you need. If the trip is important, the how you get there, the brush is a focal point. The better the brush/lather combination the better the trip. There is a diminishing return as you go into the better brushes, but to me, they are very much worth it. Had an exceptional shave this morning and my Chubby 3 two band was at the centre of it. You can not go wrong buying a high end brush, but it is a want, not a need. Pay once and you will have a luxury for life.

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 07-15-2013, 06:32 AM
#9
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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Brushes, like any object from an inexpensive stamp to a costly motor vehicle can be considered a collectible. However, possessing more than a single brush for many is about experiencing variety as opposed to simply obtaining another dust collecting trophy. If one particular hair, bristle or man made imitation of either was in truth best, then surely the variety of brushes currently on offer would cease to exist and the numerous discussions on each would go unread.

I do agree that nobody really needs more than one brush, one razor, one blade, one soap and one aftershave to achieve a good shave, but why limit yourself when there is such a wealth of variety out there to experience? Life is all about experience and each experience is unique to the individual, just because I like a particular brush doesn't mean the next person will enjoy it equally.

So if you really want to treat yourself invest in variety, but in reality the only brush you will really ever truly need is most probably the modest yet entirely functional one you already own.

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 07-15-2013, 12:21 PM
#10
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GS, A good brush can be had for what you paid, but not in badger IMO.

Yet a better brush also doesn't need to be an expensive brush or cost much more than you paid.

As already written the current crop of synthetics are really superb. Then there are the really inexpensive boars that operate WAY over their pay grade. An Omega or Semogue, and it doesn't need to be a SOC brush, is really superb. Even an $8 Omega here in north america has a really nice knot.

You can certainly buy a better badger and they feel different than a boar (different, not better) or synthetic, but the shave is no better and as far as softness goes, synthetic can be as soft or softer than the best badger, and IMO so can boar after it's broken in and soaked for just a minute.

I use all three bristles and while I wouldn't wish any of my brushes evaporate into nothingness, I think I'd miss my boars more than any other brush type if they did vanish. Brush numbers in my cabinet reflect that. I have 2 boars for every badger, and 1 synthetic for every 2 badgers, roughly.

So to answer your question, maybe, but it's not necessary if you're after a great shave. It's what you like, if you're curious go for it. It's only money. But to get a great shave one doesn't need an expensive brush. I prove that for 3/4 of my shave rotation as seen in the SOTD.

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 07-15-2013, 12:47 PM
#11
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A "as good as it gets" boar brush set in wood can be had for under $30 USD. It will make lather just as good and easily as a more costly badger brush.

Most of the difference in price is due to difference in face feel rather than an increase in performance. More hair and better design will add to the cost, and will increase performance.

However, a good black badger brush whips up just as good a lather as silvertip. IMO, FWIW.

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 07-15-2013, 07:21 PM
#12
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Geordie, you only need 2 brushes. Keep the one you already own and add a Mühle Siovertip fibre version 2 in 23 mm to your stable.
Then decide if you want a badger later on.

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 07-16-2013, 08:21 PM
#13
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(07-15-2013, 01:08 AM)geordie sam Wrote: Hi lads,Geordie Sam here, as I have said elsewhere on this site I use a fairly cheap brush (Wilkinson Sword Classic, £7 about $10) I have never used an expensive brush so can't give an opinion,but is it really worth splashing out a good few quid on a brush,please advise.
Thanks.
Sam.

My take on it is that if I rub something against my face everyday, it better feel good.

(07-15-2013, 07:21 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Geordie, you only need 2 brushes. Keep the one you already own and add a Mühle Siovertip fibre version 2 in 23 mm to your stable.
Then decide if you want a badger later on.

Excellent point. The new Muhle brushes are excellent and not expensive at all.
I am not getting rid of my Badgers but if the Muhle had been my only brush I wouldn't have much to complain about.

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