07-22-2013, 10:25 AM
#1
User Info
Thought you guys might enjoy this

A while back, a customer contacted me regarding a special project. He had stumbled across a beautiful Wade & Butcher "Diamond Edge" blade, but it had broken scales. But what he saw was a wonderful opportunity to create something special. He contacted me about creating a set of custom straight razor scales reminiscent of some of the rarest and most beautiful sets of scales that were available in the mid-1800s. Solid Mother of Pearl.
Using a material such as mother of pearl for a set of straight razor scales is generally considered impossible, because it does not flex. To get around this limitation, the manufacturers in the past would produce scales with "Panels" of mother of pearl adhered and pinned to a liner material (usually silver). Here is an example of such a set of scales, on a similar time period Wade & Butcher razor:


[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-0000.jpg]


My customer sourced some beautifully figured, A+ Grade Mother of pearl, and shipped it to me along with some small silver engraving plates and the razor:

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-00.jpg]

Upon inspection, I noticed a date scratched into the horn scales - 1865. There was also some wonderful wound silver wire inlay, along with a small MOP inlay in the center of the scale.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-000.jpg]



Although a tragedy to see cracked scales like this, at the same time it is an honor to bring this razor back to former glory (AND THEN SOME!!!). So, I began to devise a plan. Upon talking to the owner, it was clear that he wanted to maintain the original scale shape. I wholeheartedly agreed Smile So, the first step was to establish a base material. Instead of using Silver, we chose to use Nickel sheeting. It will not rust, and can be polished to a brilliant shine. Step one was cutting out some of the material.



[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-01.jpg]

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-02.jpg]


Once I had the two rectangles of sheeting cut out, I traced on the scale shape.


[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-03.jpg]

And then I trimmed up the two pieces fairly close to my trace lines.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-04.jpg]

After I had my two rough pieces of Nickel cut out, I taped them together using ShurTape Double sided carpet tape, ensuring to line up the traced patterns as accurately as possible.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-05.jpg]

Once together, I continued shaping and profiling them, until I had a reasonably close match to the original (A little slop on the edges is always nice before final shaping). I also took another trace of the original scale, and I planned out the paneling. I measured 7mm on each side of the panel dividers for the panel fastening pins. Everything is very accurately measured on the paper template.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-06.jpg]

After I planned out the panels, I superglued the paper right on to the two pieces of sheeting. This gave me a perfect template for the next step.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-08.jpg]

I drilled all 6 holes with a 1/16" bit on my drill press. Here you can see the opposite side from the side that I superglued the paper to.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-07.jpg]

After that, it was time to plan out each individual panel.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-09.jpg]

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-10.jpg]

Once they were planned out, I carefully began to shape each piece, initially with a band saw, and then switched to a belt sander. Here is one of the pieces, shaped within reason (always leaving some excess hanging off the sides!!!). You'll also noticed that I have roughed up the surfaces of the MOP and the nickel sheeting in order for Epoxy to hold well. I used a 100 grit sandpaper for this.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-11.jpg]

Since the other side still has the paper template, I know EXACTLY where to epoxy the MOP to the nickel. Here I am lining things up / test fitting to ensure my MOP is correctly sized.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-12.jpg]

Here, we see the first piece epoxied on and clamped. I made sure to constantly remove the epoxy from the edges on the sides before it dried. That way I will be sure to get a good, flat fit for the other two panels (no excess epoxy)

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-13.jpg]

Next, I cut a small piece of nickel sheeting and flattened one edge. This is going to be stood up perpendicular to the scale and epoxied in place between the two panels to act as a decorative divider, just as the original 1800s set of scales in the picture I'm modeling after had.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-14.jpg]

So, I repeated this for the pivot end of the scale, and then I epoxied all of the panels in place.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-15.jpg]

So, that is how it sat overnight while it set. one scale worth of panels epoxied so far. I will update this thread as I continue on!

0 41
Reply
 07-22-2013, 10:33 AM
#2
User Info
Very, very interesting. Thank you for showing this.

183 12,002
Reply
 07-22-2013, 10:52 AM
#3
User Info
Look good Brad!

0 93
Reply
 07-22-2013, 11:16 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
I love seeing the different steps and the the final results. Can't wait.

173 23,499
Reply
 07-22-2013, 02:39 PM
#5
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
User Info
staying tuned for the final result !

0 1,291
Reply
 07-22-2013, 02:56 PM
#6
  • Grumpy
  • Senior Member
  • DisneyLand
User Info
That looks very very nice.

1 819
Reply
 07-22-2013, 04:44 PM
#7
User Info
Update!

So, I took the scales off of the clamps, and then I scraped off all of the paper that was super glued on the nickel sheeting. Then, I took my 1/16" Drill bit and drilled right through all of the holes that were in the nickel sheeting straight through the 3 MOP panels on the other side. This made it so that the holes were perfectly positioned. Obviously I have quite a bit of excess MOP material hanging off the sides. that is OK though! Smile

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-16.jpg]

Then, I sanded the MOP side flat with my disc sander. This ground down the excess nickel sheeting that was sticking out on the panel dividers.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-17.jpg]

I was then able to do the whole thing over again on the other side. I trimmed up the MOP pieces to the correct dimensions, and then epoxied them in place, starting with the center piece:

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-18.jpg]

And then I put in my nickel panel dividers and epoxied in the other two panels:

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-19.jpg]

You can see the dividers sticking out. All that excess material will go away after it sets up!

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-20.jpg]

Thats it for tonight!

0 41
Reply
 07-22-2013, 05:04 PM
#8
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
I remember watching my dad doing MoP restores to pocket knives. I am really looking forward to your next update!

33 914
Reply
 07-23-2013, 06:35 PM
#9
User Info
Here we go!

First, I unclamped the scales. The epoxy set extremely solid.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-21.jpg]

I took it to the belt sander, and flattened out the pile side scale

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-22.jpg]

After that, I used the pre-drilled holes on the front scale to drill through the pile side scale.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-23.jpg]

I then did some more profiling with the belt sander, and when I started getting close to my original tracings, I took the original scale and I bolted it on to the the MOP scales so that I had an exact profile to match.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-24.jpg]

You can see a little bit of excess material that I had to grind down.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-25.jpg]

After a little more sanding, I was close to the original profile

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-26.jpg]

You can see no overhangs now Smile

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-27.jpg]

Then, I spent about 30 minutes on the belt sander, very carefully and slowly thinning out the scales (they started around .125" ea, and I thinned them to approx .11"). MOP chips easily, and sands slowly, so, it was a delicate process.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-28.jpg]

So, it was on to hand sanding. I started at 220 grit and went to town.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-29.jpg]

With every grit, it got prettier and prettier

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-30.jpg]

After a buff, I was just stunned!

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-32.jpg]

Unfortunately, there was no time to enjoy. it was on to the next step. I started to carefully pin the panels on to the nickel liners, one hole at a time

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-33.jpg]

After each of them were pinned, I buffed up the heads on the MOP side

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-34.jpg]

Then I ran some 1000 grit sandpaper along the back side of the scales (the nickel sheeting, and then gave them a quick buff. A final buff will come later.

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-35.jpg]

Thats it for today! Still a few steps to go!

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-36.jpg]

0 41
Reply
 07-23-2013, 06:40 PM
#10
User Info
I'd tell you what I really think but forum rules prohibit such language so I will just say that they look "Fantastic" and leave it at that. Smile

1 622
Reply
 07-26-2013, 02:22 AM
#11
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
User Info
Brad, how long did it take you to hand pin all those pins with the MoP looming right behind the hammers head..

Wow..I am getting the shakes just thinking about one missed-placed hammer blow.

33 914
Reply
 07-26-2013, 04:01 AM
#12
User Info
(07-26-2013, 02:22 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Brad, how long did it take you to hand pin all those pins with the MoP looming right behind the hammers head..

Wow..I am getting the shakes just thinking about one missed-placed hammer blow.

Oh, believe me. Every step of the way I have been nervous. I probably tapped those pins 100 times each. and it ain't over yet. Saturday is my next day in shop... We will find out if the MOP survives the final steps. Smile

0 41
Reply
 07-26-2013, 12:41 PM
#13
User Info
I used to have hands like that but some of my New medications in my Old age keep my hands moving even when I try to steady them.

If it were me I'd crack a panel, get pissed, and smash the entire thing into dust. Biggrin

1 622
Reply
 07-28-2013, 07:24 PM
#14
User Info
Well guys! I finished up the project!!

I decided to use the original lead wedge, but, it was pretty gunky, so, I started to clean it up

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-37.jpg]

Here are the edges, polished up

[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-38.jpg]

Then it was just a matter of pinning it into the wedge end of the scales


[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-39.jpg]

And finally, here it is - the reason for ALL of that work - a mother of pearl scale that is capable of flexing!


[Image: mother-of-pearl-straight-razor-40.jpg]

Here are some finished pics! Smile

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-10.jpg]

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-01.jpg]

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-03.jpg]

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-12.jpg]

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-08.jpg]

[Image: wade-butcher-mop-14.jpg]

0 41
Reply
 07-29-2013, 12:40 AM
#15
User Info
Lovely work, and a very informative and a detailed process, I like the way you work things out I would have used a simular method If I were thinking of making a set from Mother of pearl.

Jamie.

5 1,805
Reply
 07-29-2013, 05:19 AM
#16
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
User Info
Outstanding work and an absolute pleasure to be be able to share in the process involved, thank-you!

91 17,816
Reply
 07-29-2013, 05:56 AM
#17
User Info
You're welcome!!! It was a fun project. Lots of work though Wink

0 41
Reply
 07-29-2013, 06:33 AM
#18
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
That is a beautiful restore, or should I say remake. Thanks for sharing the process.

173 23,499
Reply
 07-29-2013, 08:06 AM
#19
User Info
Great looking razor! Thanks for taking us through the process. Seeing all the work that went into the restoration increases my jealousy of the new owner who gets to use this beauty.

33 115
Reply
 08-03-2013, 07:22 AM
#20
User Info
Absolutely STUNNING work and restoration!!!!!!!! I have 4 straights I inherited from my Dad and your restoration has given me the ambition to accept the challenge to bring mine back from the scrap heap. Cool

(07-22-2013, 10:25 AM)Undream Wrote: Thought you guys might enjoy this

A while back, a customer contacted me regarding a special project. He had stumbled across a beautiful Wade & Butcher "Diamond Edge" blade, but it had broken scales. But what he saw was a wonderful opportunity to create something special. He contacted me about creating a set of custom straight razor scales reminiscent of some of the rarest and most beautiful sets of scales that were available in the mid-1800s. Solid Mother of Pearl.
Using a material such as mother of pearl for a set of straight razor scales is generally considered impossible, because it does not flex. To get around this limitation, the manufacturers in the past would produce scales with "Panels" of mother of pearl adhered and pinned to a liner material (usually silver). Here is an example of such a set of scales, on a similar time period Wade & Butcher razor:

My customer sourced some beautifully figured, A+ Grade Mother of pearl, and shipped it to me along with some small silver engraving plates and the razor:

Upon inspection, I noticed a date scratched into the horn scales - 1865. There was also some wonderful wound silver wire inlay, along with a small MOP inlay in the center of the scale.

Although a tragedy to see cracked scales like this, at the same time it is an honor to bring this razor back to former glory (AND THEN SOME!!!). So, I began to devise a plan. Upon talking to the owner, it was clear that he wanted to maintain the original scale shape. I wholeheartedly agreed Smile So, the first step was to establish a base material. Instead of using Silver, we chose to use Nickel sheeting. It will not rust, and can be polished to a brilliant shine. Step one was cutting out some of the material.

Once I had the two rectangles of sheeting cut out, I traced on the scale shape.

And then I trimmed up the two pieces fairly close to my trace lines.

After I had my two rough pieces of Nickel cut out, I taped them together using ShurTape Double sided carpet tape, ensuring to line up the traced patterns as accurately as possible.

Once together, I continued shaping and profiling them, until I had a reasonably close match to the original (A little slop on the edges is always nice before final shaping). I also took another trace of the original scale, and I planned out the paneling. I measured 7mm on each side of the panel dividers for the panel fastening pins. Everything is very accurately measured on the paper template.

After I planned out the panels, I superglued the paper right on to the two pieces of sheeting. This gave me a perfect template for the next step.

I drilled all 6 holes with a 1/16" bit on my drill press. Here you can see the opposite side from the side that I superglued the paper to.

After that, it was time to plan out each individual panel.

Once they were planned out, I carefully began to shape each piece, initially with a band saw, and then switched to a belt sander. Here is one of the pieces, shaped within reason (always leaving some excess hanging off the sides!!!). You'll also noticed that I have roughed up the surfaces of the MOP and the nickel sheeting in order for Epoxy to hold well. I used a 100 grit sandpaper for this.

Since the other side still has the paper template, I know EXACTLY where to epoxy the MOP to the nickel. Here I am lining things up / test fitting to ensure my MOP is correctly sized.

Here, we see the first piece epoxied on and clamped. I made sure to constantly remove the epoxy from the edges on the sides before it dried. That way I will be sure to get a good, flat fit for the other two panels (no excess epoxy)

Next, I cut a small piece of nickel sheeting and flattened one edge. This is going to be stood up perpendicular to the scale and epoxied in place between the two panels to act as a decorative divider, just as the original 1800s set of scales in the picture I'm modeling after had.

So, I repeated this for the pivot end of the scale, and then I epoxied all of the panels in place.

So, that is how it sat overnight while it set. one scale worth of panels epoxied so far. I will update this thread as I continue on!

The picture of the scales with all the clamps attached reminds me of a quote from the Six Million Dollar Man........ "We have the technology...We can rebuild him!"

Great Work Sir!

0 74
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)