04-17-2012, 06:29 PM
#1
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Something I wrote elsewhere in a response to the question:

Why do some people have so many razors ?

When you look at it objectively compared to other activities,this is a pursuit where you can obtain items from the most basic to the most elite and relatively speaking the money spent overall really isn't much....especially compared to many other things I or many of my friends are involved in.

I could have a bunch of similar 80-90 year old razors and want to hang on to them all.Those razors are from a different time and a way different world......A world where they built razors made of triple plated silver over copper,razors that were built well enough that I could shave with one of those little 94 year old pieces of history this morning.I could shave with that old razor and know that when it was manufactured back in 1918 when my Grandfather was in Europe fighting in World War One.

My '49 Super Speed reminds me of my Father,preparing to go to work each day with his Super Speed when I was a kid....My thoughts drift and I think that back in 1949 he was a bright eyed young man who'd served in the Air Force in World War Two,looking optimistically at a world full of promise as he shaved with his Super Speed in those post war days.

It's weird but in a strange sort of way it's made me think,put things in perspective.It doesn't hurt anything to keep a few old razors around....

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 04-17-2012, 06:33 PM
#2
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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I have always felt that way; it is part of the allure of traditional wet shaving for me. Smile

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 04-17-2012, 06:38 PM
#3
  • TexBilly
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Austin, TX
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Here here! I often think of yesteryear when I use one of my vintage razors. Not too long ago, I gifted my Dad a cased Superspeed and it took him back instantly. Besides the good shaves, it does remind of us of a long gone era. Then again, we're living in a time of resurgence and plentiful wetshaving choices. Smile

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 04-17-2012, 06:48 PM
#4
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Snapshots of history! Even if you weren't alive when your Gillette razor was made, Find out what was going on in this world when it was new. I have 2 1930's era New razors. Think about what the people using them were going through. Just a thought.
Great post razorx!

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 04-18-2012, 10:43 AM
#5
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it's a great perspective, however the sentiment/memories just don't connect for me when i pick up razors at home...

i do wonder what home or original store they came from and i would love to know the history, but i kind of feel they were put aside and forgotten for so many years.

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 04-18-2012, 10:52 AM
#6
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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I don't use DE razors, but use and have a modest collection of straights. I'm not sure how many I have but probably too many. It may be similar to a DE but with straight razors I find that there is a realy big variety out there of straight razors. The feel and even technique changes from a 4/8-8/8 razor is huge sometimes, then you have full hollow to wedge grinds, and even different types of steels. For me now, I'm trying to narrow in on my preferred straight and focus from there. I'm sure at some time I'll be bringing it down to a unique 7 day set.

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 04-18-2012, 01:20 PM
#7
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I thoroughly enjoy shaving with the razor in 2012 that my Dad shaved with in 1949. I have good memories every morning.

   

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 04-18-2012, 05:21 PM
#8
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I remember my dad shaving with a Gillette New open-comb razor, Red and Black set, in the 1940's. By the 1950's, we were both using Gillette TTO razors with Gillette Blue blades, which were preferred over the Thin Gillette blades.

Dad died in 2004 at 94 years, and I never found his old Red and Black set.

However, a friend on B&B sold me two Gillette New open-comb razors, one of which was a Red and Black set, that I had re-plated in Nickel. Biggrin

   

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 04-18-2012, 05:53 PM
#9
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That is very nice Nick.

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 04-18-2012, 06:45 PM
#10
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Razorx, you hit the nail square on the head IMO. Thumbsup

I have some razors that are over 100 years old and they shave as good for me today as they did for someone way back then.

Granddads razor is in pretty bad shape, but I have substitutes of similar models that aren't, so I use them. But the connection to the past is definitely there with every shave.

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 04-18-2012, 11:12 PM
#11
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i am waiting until June to pick up my dad's Gillette old type OC. Looking forward to it! He has not used it, unfortunately, for over 30 years!

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 04-19-2012, 07:26 AM
#12
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(04-18-2012, 05:21 PM)wknicholas Wrote: I remember my dad shaving with a Gillette New open-comb razor, Red and Black set, in the 1940's. By the 1950's, we were both using Gillette TTO razors with Gillette Blue blades, which were preferred over the Thin Gillette blades.

Dad died in 2004 at 94 years, and I never found his old Red and Black set.

However, a friend on B&B sold me two Gillette New open-comb razors, one of which was a Red and Black set, that I had re-plated in Nickel. Biggrin

Thats very nice Nick. My mom tossed my dad's 56'Flaretip after he died in 1980. I remember him teaching me how to shave with it when I was growing up. One of my first razors that I purchased was a 56' Flaretip with the plastic travel case just like dad's.

Clayton

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 04-20-2012, 09:43 PM
#13
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I have four vintage razors, a '49-50 Aristocrat (I was born in 1950 so I call this my "birth year" razor), a '46 Tech (based on the date codes of the blades in the box), '57 Tech, and a '64 Super Speed. I like using them all and thinking who might have owned them originally. The Super Speed is what I *think* I started shaving with around '66-67 so this one could have been the one my dad gave me. Or not.

But what I like about traditional shaving is the tradition so using vintage razors pleases me.

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 04-21-2012, 03:29 AM
#14
  • Leon
  • Active Member
  • Porto, Portugal
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Well, some of my oldest items are:

A Sheffield razor that dates back almost 2 centuries. Although I can't precise the exact year it was made, I was told it's from the 1820's, so it was made somewhere when the would be-Queen Victoria was only a child.

But my oldest items are my hones. They are millions of years old. So, when nature "gave birth" to them, the Dinosaurs ruled Earth. Biggrin

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 04-21-2012, 05:46 AM
#15
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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The only recollection I have of my Dad shaving is with an electric.

For me the allure of have various vintage razors, I like the personalities of each one. Each one brings it's own uniqueness to my morning shave.

I also enjoy nostalgia, I enjoy using older things. Besides vintage razors, I also use vintage fountain pens. I enjoy using them because all have a history behind them.

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 04-21-2012, 06:04 AM
#16
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Well for one thing the saying, "They don't make them like that any more," really does apply here.

Even though most were mass produced, they have an artisan edge to them. Current production units are good, but they lack differentiating character because only a few companies now try to follow in the footsteps of the past.

In the day, scores of companies were trying to improve upon each other, or look and feel different. That is one, not all the reasons, why the vintage razors are so enjoyable. They also contain a hidden history somewhere as well that the modern products don't have on the count of a lack of time in existence.

Enjoy your vintage razors in good health.

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