08-28-2013, 07:46 PM
#1
  • LORDBISHOP
  • Lover of the Wet Shaving way of Life
  • Westchester, NY
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Once I had read about palm stropping a DE blade, I honestly never stopped, thinking and feeling that my first few passes had improved...until, Now...it seems I'm paying more attention to the directions on blade wrappers that say "do not wipe". Gillette Silver Blues for instance seem to have improved now that I just remove some glue/wax and pop the blade into a razor without any stropping...what does everyone think about this subject?

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 08-28-2013, 08:09 PM
#2
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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My understanding of palm stropping was always that it made the blade last longer not make the blade better out of box. In either case though I've never considered trying it. I just can't imagine it could do any good for a new blade...

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 08-28-2013, 08:40 PM
#3
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In my experience, SE blades greatly benefit from palm stropping when they are fresh out of the box. It seems to tame them down a bit.

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 08-28-2013, 09:35 PM
#4
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i have tried palm-stropping DE blades, but have noticed no significant improvement. Granted, i have only tried stropping them after 4-5 shaves to see if they would last longer or improve the smoothness of the blade. i don't see the point in doing this with DE blades as they are so cheap. However, you may think otherwise. Smile

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 08-29-2013, 06:39 AM
#5
  • Grumpy
  • Senior Member
  • DisneyLand
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I think that if you were to strop a DE Blade then you would want to do it with a Carbon Blade.

The theory is that a Carbon Blade can be stropped.

In the 1930s DE users used a Drinking Glass to do this. Then special Glass Sharpeners were produced and then you have the mechanical sharpeners that were made.

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 08-29-2013, 10:20 AM
#6
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DE blades should not be stropped out of the box because you're accelerating the removal of the teflon coating.

If the blade doesn't have a coating, then strop away, won't do any harm.

Stropping will probably prolong the DE blade since at the very least it will help ensure the removal of any residual moisture. At best, it will realign the blade.

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 09-03-2013, 09:15 PM
#7
  • LORDBISHOP
  • Lover of the Wet Shaving way of Life
  • Westchester, NY
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Thank you guys for the input...my original thinking and research was that DE blades have miniscule metal fragments after production...this supposedly leads to the scenario where a blade gives a couple less than smooth passes before "calming" down for each subsequent pass/shave. ASHARPERRAZOR makes a great point (pun intended) and this is along the lines I've realized through experience...the blades with any kind of coating, even platinum coatings do better without stropping...but some stainless blades do seem to improve, like with green and yellow pack Gillette's.

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 01-27-2015, 04:04 AM
#8
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My vote is for stropping  or corking blades to align the edge. Also, I find it very logical as you would do the same with a straight razor, continue to realign the blade for and after use. 

Philipp

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 01-27-2015, 04:08 AM
#9
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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(08-28-2013, 08:40 PM)BladeDE40 Wrote: In my experience,  SE blades greatly benefit from palm stropping when they are fresh out of the box. It seems to tame them down a bit.

Indeed but I don't do that because I love them at their sharpest.

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 01-27-2015, 05:50 AM
#10
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(01-27-2015, 04:08 AM)Snuff Wrote:
(08-28-2013, 08:40 PM)BladeDE40 Wrote: In my experience,  SE blades greatly benefit from palm stropping when they are fresh out of the box. It seems to tame them down a bit.

Indeed but I don't do that because I love them at their sharpest.

using a stiff strop and/ or little pressure will help. There is not much to be lost, we are not even using abrasives. With a knife blade I could confidently tell you it will be sharper after stropping. Stropping a DE blade is not an easy task, though

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 01-27-2015, 09:38 AM
#11
  • kav
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If  stropping improved blades the factories would be competing with the wine industry for cork. You can strop a cork or strop on the first pass. Do you really want to donate  a fraction of blade life to a cork? A razor blade is a very thin creature. When you place it in a rigid razor there is reduced distortion of the blade edge. This is what STEELING a knife corrects. Stropping  a straight edge razor on a leather strop is SHARPENING. Carbon blades go dull because of greater oxidation ( rust) than a stainless. The old method of glass stropping/sharpening renewed the carbon edge but is useless on stainless. We all follow various strategems based on obsolescent practices, folklore and personal whim.
The actual results are suspect.
I have to log off and align my shaving kit with true north .Pyewacket had fun this morning.

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 01-27-2015, 10:39 AM
#12
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(01-27-2015, 09:38 AM)kav Wrote: If  stropping improved blades the factories would be competing with the wine industry for cork. You can strop a cork or strop on the first pass. Do you really want to donate  a fraction of blade life to a cork? A razor blade is a very thin creature. When you place it in a rigid razor there is reduced distortion of the blade edge. This is what STEELING a knife corrects. Stropping  a straight edge razor on a leather strop is SHARPENING. Carbon blades go dull because of greater oxidation ( rust) than a stainless. The old method of glass stropping/sharpening renewed the carbon edge but is useless on stainless.

There is no such thing as stainless steel, just less corrosion per time unit. Every blade steel needs carbon, chrome does help but not make anything rustproof.
There is one kind of knife steel available  that replaces Carbon with Nitron, but that is not used in shaving cutlery. Benchmade and Spydeco are known for using these hightech steels in some of their knives. With that exception, and I think only this exception-
All blades, especially delicately ground sharp blades will certainly rust when exposd to wet condition and soap.


Using leather without abrasives never is considered sharpening. Not much  abrasion can take place, but deformation can take place. Stropping must be done without damaging the delicate apex. So it is indeed not for the unexperienced.
A deformed blade edge will  oxidize and fracture more easily, and it will damage your skin.  Edges are dirty and deformed by corrosion and use.
Straight razor edges and Safety razor blades are as far as this is concerned the same thing, I still believe...        Philipp

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 01-27-2015, 12:09 PM
#13
  • kav
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If I bury a stainless steel mora knife alongside a high carbon steel mora knife for 3 months in my rosebush pot both will exhibit different levels of oxidation. Stainless is rust resistant. Considering how we store and then actually use razorblades in @ a week's time biblical threats of rusts and dust from moths is irrelevant. I didn't invent the term Rostfrei. the older, carbon blades will lose sharpness overtime due to micro oxidation on the unblued edge. This is why people used stropping strategems to freshen the blade.
it's a waste on ROSTFREI, stainless or whatever.   

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 01-27-2015, 12:56 PM
#14
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We d have to disagree on this
I can strop stainless steel knives like the Mora 12c27 again and again, and I will keep it sharp partially by stropping alone. Cooks do it with their steels, realigning the edge of their stainless kitchen knives

Of course lots o people do hone their stainless straight razors, no big difference.

This stainless etc. stuff is good to talk us into throwing away the razor blades, wich has always been a great business model for Gillette

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 01-27-2015, 03:16 PM
#15
  • kav
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HONING AKA steeling uses a material with a greater rockwell hardness ( tempered glass) and passing a blade edge over to mechanically press any warped, misaligned,twisted, out of alignment portions of the blade edge into a uniform plane without the removal of material. Passing a blade over a rough, but lesser Rockwell; sharpening stones, leather impregnated with fine lapping compounds or not, corks, skin is the act of sharpening a blade edge via material removal to effect a reduced molecular construct or 'edge'. If you spend some time @ www.knifeforums.com or www.bladeforums.com they can extrapolate on this all day.
My real forte' is  secondary wear profiles and reknapping on upper period Chumash and Tongva edges utilizing chert, imported obsidian and Chinese ceramics from wrecked great circle route galleons. It's available at UCB, anthro department and just about as relevant as this thread.

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 01-27-2015, 11:32 PM
#16
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(01-27-2015, 03:16 PM)kav Wrote: HONING AKA steeling uses a material with a greater rockwell hardness ( tempered glass) and passing a blade edge over to mechanically press any warped, misaligned,twisted, out of alignment portions of the blade edge into a uniform plane without the removal of material. Passing a blade over a rough, but lesser Rockwell; sharpening stones, leather impregnated with fine lapping compounds or not, corks, skin is the act of sharpening a blade edge via material removal to effect a reduced molecular construct or 'edge'. If you spend some time @ www.knifeforums.com or www.bladeforums.com they can extrapolate on this all day.
My real forte' is  secondary wear profiles and reknapping on upper period Chumash and Tongva edges utilizing chert, imported obsidian and Chinese ceramics from wrecked great circle route galleons. It's available at UCB, anthro department and just about as relevant as this thread.

IMO you are mixing up things here. Sharpening materials usually imply abrasives which are harder on a Rockwell scale than the material sharpened. The process involving leather and no abrasive on leather is not considered sharpening but stropping.  The reason a kitchen steel is harder than the knives that are "sharpened" on it by aligning the edge is to avoid wear on it. I do not buy it all but steeling is considered as not removing any metal at all.
I did  spend some time  sharpening knives and reading things up so this may be worth your time

The process I am talking about is realigning the blade.
If anybody uses pressure on a strop or goes into the apex is not realigning but deforming the edge.

A key source for
 terminology and applied technique  was jdavis882. This is "advanced stuff."..Wink
This video is not about stropping, it is about sharpening knives with a strop. Abrasives are used on the strop.  It is very interesting as far as terms and applied skills




Philipp

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