09-07-2013, 02:49 PM
#1
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Hello all!

I had the good fortune of finding a beautiful late 18th century straight razor at a local antique shop. From a quick googling of the words "Acier Fondu" found on the tang it seems to be either a George Wolstenholm or George Johnson, made sometime between 1740, the beginning of cast steel, and 1820, the end if the "acier fondu" stamp. That's all I've managed to discover. Do any of our straight razor gurus have any Mir information regarding this beauty?

[Image: u9yvahej.jpg]

[Image: e6y7apup.jpg]

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 09-07-2013, 02:59 PM
#2
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That's extremely cool! I love those old blades!

They may not be the best shavers (most are capable, but not spectacular), but the history and beauty of the razors is amazing.

One suggestion: if you're going to restore it to use, you might want to consider doing a very light restoration. Some 0000 steel wool with some Maas will take off all the active rust, and that should be enough. Lightly oiling the scales with Neatsfoot oil should make them glow.

Of course, it's your razor, you you can do as you wish, but I hate to see these old razors shined up like new metal.

-----

Congrats! If you ever feel you want to part with it, PM me. Biggrin

Incidentally, I doubt it's a Wostenholm. The old Wosty's usually have their 'Pipe' logo somewhere. The Acier Fondu just means cast steel. It's probably English or French made (they all used French for blade labeling).

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 09-07-2013, 03:29 PM
#3
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(09-07-2013, 02:59 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: That's extremely cool! I love those old blades!

They may not be the best shavers (most are capable, but not spectacular), but the history and beauty of the razors is amazing.

One suggestion: if you're going to restore it to use, you might want to consider doing a very light restoration. Some 0000 steel wool with some Maas will take off all the active rust, and that should be enough. Lightly oiling the scales with Neatsfoot oil should make them glow.

Of course, it's your razor, you you can do as you wish, but I hate to see these old razors shined up like new metal.

-----

Congrats! If you ever feel you want to part with it, PM me. Biggrin

Incidentally, I doubt it's a Wostenholm. The old Wosty's usually have their 'Pipe' logo somewhere. The Acier Fondu just means cast steel. It's probably English or French made (they all used French for blade labeling).

I see, so maybe the George Johnson estimate I found on SRP is more accurate. There is something else stamped into the tang, but I can't tell what it is.

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 09-07-2013, 03:38 PM
#4
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Johnson also used a discernible trademark (dart + pipe), and that doesn't match what's stamped on your razor.

Given the number of straight razor makers around at the time this razor was probably made (the range you state is correct) it could be anyone. I tried to read the rest of the stamp too, and couldn't make it out.

Hopefully someone else who knows the trademarks will chime in. That guy Manah on SRP seems to be a fount of trademark info, you might try him.

Either way, it's a lovely razor.

Edit: Further research turned up the fact that Wostenholm did not buy off the pipe trademark until the 1800's, so their razors prior to this point may not have the pipe stamp. They would still have been marked with the Wostenholm name somewhere, though. (I read this in the thread you probably pulled up on SRP).

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 09-07-2013, 04:53 PM
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Am I the only one to notice the price tag of $3.00????

PLEASE tell me it is April first and you put that sticker on there yourself. Good heavens, what a deal.

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 09-07-2013, 05:04 PM
#6
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Anthony, that is a lovely older razor! Congrats! Biggrin

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 09-07-2013, 06:10 PM
#7
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Hey ... it is a 3.00 razor because who would shave with it. It is a very old cut-throat razor.

Now ... if it were me ... I would glady pay the 3 Bucks and clean it up so I could shave with it.

Congrats

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 09-07-2013, 06:14 PM
#8
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It was indeed only $3.00, buried under a pile of broken and rusty straights going for $20+ each!

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 09-08-2013, 06:30 AM
#9
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So, no we move onto the idea of restoration? Yay or nay? I've had one excellent suggestion, if I do plan on restoring it, or having the original scales inlayed into a modern material, since they are so ornate for such an old razor. Personally, I really like that idea.

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 09-08-2013, 07:58 AM
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Doing more research, maybe the "OLF" on the tang stands for WOLF, which was a signature of John Sheppard of Sheffield, 1770-1795

Source: http://www.anwealde.com/razors/bothlummus.pdf

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 09-08-2013, 10:17 AM
#11
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Anthony, good luck if you do restore it! I would go with some modern material for the scales. There are some real beauties out there as examples.

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 09-08-2013, 11:21 AM
#12
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I know you will get traditionalist who will say don't touch the razor and just hone it, but to be honest I'm not to sure those circles in the scales are original, me personally I would remove the scales completely restore the blade, make an exact copy of the horn scales minus those circles, hone the razor and use it.

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 09-08-2013, 12:27 PM
#13
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If it isn't broken (the scales I mean) my preference (if it was mine, of course) would be just to take off any active rust, put a great edge on it, and use it a little bit, just to know you can and did, then you might want to oil it up and keep it "as found".

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 09-08-2013, 02:53 PM
#14
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It's amazing how divided people are on this subject!

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 09-08-2013, 03:25 PM
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  • Macko
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Go with your gut, you know what they say about opinions...

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 09-08-2013, 03:26 PM
#16
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I like your idea of inlaying the old scales into new material. It's a way of keeping the old, but with a new twist. No matter what you decide to do, you've got yourself a great piece of history.

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 09-10-2013, 02:33 AM
#17
  • MikekiM
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(09-08-2013, 11:21 AM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote: I know you will get traditionalist who will say don't touch the razor and just hone it, but to be honest I'm not to sure those circles in the scales are original, me personally I would remove the scales completely restore the blade, make an exact copy of the horn scales minus those circles, hone the razor and use it.

Yeah, what he said.,,

Biggrin

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 06-12-2014, 02:12 PM
#18
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Hy everybody

Well I´m not english, you´ll see easyly by my horrible english, My name is Roberto and I write from Galiza in Spain, I colect english razors, and this particular item, 18yh century razors (or alder if it´s posible) I could not resist to put my hand and my nose in your complain, quite interesting, main of all the razor you habe (congratulations) seems to be one of the Châtellerault razors, you can see a small rest of the maker stamp over the standar inscription, normally this marks are regulated by french kings and we conserve a quite interesting pice of coper were all the new makers mus to put the mark they will used, well sure you have a caos cause my english, better I put a link to see by yourself this placke. http://www.alienor.org/AlienorWeb/public...doc=655299. The scales are tipicall os a standar razor of the last quarter of the 18th century, horn scales ornated with knife marked cicules, Obbiusly you don´t need my advise, but I´m goig to bring you it free. The blade is provably a wedge, os a half a wedge, and you could be sure that is quite dificult use one of this actually, not imposible, but you can find a hollow grownd with 100 years old easier to use, but if you want use it, the idea to complete the deteriorated part by anothe actual material is not a bad idea, the original scales safe its body and you complete the form of the initial work, in this matter I´d use acrilic resin, you have a lot of resines to choose in market, probably the better is the poliester resin, you can make a mould by hard paper, is not necesary to be quite good done, and fill it with the prepared resin (you knoy you habe two components to misture) uneted it with the original, after you´ll get a quite hard producto, ad you can use a mecanical small tool to match the new part with the older. I know actually you can get cristal resin, and with the same result, but if you prefer copy the color of the primitive scales in the mew part, you´ll get the same resul with epoxi glue, quite cheep, you can use colous dust used in manual works to get the colour you want, after mixture the two components you add the dust, brown ou brown and yellow, stir it hard ad use the resulting mass to make the disapear part, after it dry, you can use a dremell for example, cause you´ll get a product hard like stone. Better make firs proves in a peace of wood, to know the posivilities of the product. Well It´s all Blush sorry by my parlament ans good luky with your find razor. regards

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 06-12-2014, 02:32 PM
#19
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The stub tang definitely shouts pre-1800. Beautiful find for $3.

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 06-12-2014, 02:46 PM
#20
  • minimalist
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It IS a WOLF Sheppard. Major score. Beautiful historic straight

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