09-18-2013, 04:00 AM
#1
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This is a little tutorial on how to make a set of horn scales for those of you who don't have a workshop or power tools, this is a easy step by step guide for you.
[Image: 39a688b8-f09c-41af-9ebc-e5963031b481_zps...g~original]

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And this is what you can achieve, this set I made only in blond horn using exactly the same method.

[Image: 003-11_zps48b91c0d.jpg~original]

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 09-18-2013, 05:06 AM
#2
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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Thank you for sharing Jamie Biggrin

Would those steps work better for certain materials?
Acrylic vs wood vs bone

Blessings,
James

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 4

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 09-18-2013, 05:12 AM
#3
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Thanks for sharing!

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 09-18-2013, 05:59 AM
#4
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(09-18-2013, 05:06 AM)gijames Wrote: Thank you for sharing Jamie Biggrin

Would those steps work better for certain materials?
Acrylic vs wood vs bone

Blessings,
James

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 4


James you can use the exact same methods for bone acrylics and wood except when I part them I usually drop them in warm water which for obvious reasons you wouldn't do with wood I just use a stanley knife and carefully open the wood scales apart.

I also forgot to add, do not part the scales until you are fully satisfied with the shape sanding and finish of the scales, then what I do is drop them into a plastic kitchen bowl full of warm water and using lets say 6K wet & dry as my final finish you will then get some of the water going in between the masking tape and double sided tape making it much easier for the scales part company.

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 09-18-2013, 06:13 AM
#5
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Jamie,
Thanks for this. I have a question though about the wedge. If you finish the scales up to 6k before separating them, don't you then add the wedge and have to do some rough sanding to it to get it perfect with the scales? Doesn't that mean resending that part of the scales back up to 6k?

Or, do you shape and finish the wedge completely before putting it in the scales?
mark

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 09-18-2013, 07:09 AM
#6
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Hi Mark you are correct thanks for pointing this out, I fit the wedge and then finish the area with some final work and polishing, and as regards to the shape of the wedge I will get the fit really tight and exact leaving the wedge a little proud of the scales then finish it flush like this one I finished a little while back.

[Image: Taylors1000005_zps7ed43f9b.jpg~original]

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 09-18-2013, 09:39 AM
#7
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Great post, Jamie! I only wish I used straights!!
The scales look great!!Biggrin

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 09-18-2013, 10:21 AM
#8
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(09-18-2013, 09:39 AM)celestino Wrote: Great post, Jamie! I only wish I used straights!!
The scales look great!!Biggrin

Thanks Celestino, It's nice knowing you can still make things without plugging an electric cable into a socket.

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 09-20-2013, 02:15 AM
#9
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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Great post Jamie... I have a few blades that need new scales.

What I don't have is the material for the scales. While I have tons of exotic woods I could cut down to size, I really like giraffe bone and blonde horn. I have seen giraffe leg bones for sale, but not sized material.

Also spent some time on Micro Fasteners yesterday, but wasn't able to narrow down what sizes of pins & washers, screws and nuts to order...

Last challenge that has me stalled is sizing the wedge.

Any links that might help with these steps?

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 09-20-2013, 02:28 AM
#10
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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Wonderful visual tutorial Jamie, you make it look far easier than I believe it actually is, thank-you for sharing!

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 09-20-2013, 11:21 AM
#11
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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(09-18-2013, 10:21 AM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote: Thanks Celestino, It's nice knowing you can still make things without plugging an electric cable into a socket.

So.....hand crank old school drill for the pins? LOL
I kid, but those are some great looking scales!

Out of curiosity, is there any reason for doing it this way? Say you have a bandsaw, is it too rough or does it heat up the horn? Or was it just for the sake of making them 'the old fashioned way'?

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 09-20-2013, 11:49 AM
#12
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(09-20-2013, 11:21 AM)Kavik79 Wrote:
(09-18-2013, 10:21 AM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote: Thanks Celestino, It's nice knowing you can still make things without plugging an electric cable into a socket.

So.....hand crank old school drill for the pins? LOL
I kid, but those are some great looking scales!

Out of curiosity, is there any reason for doing it this way? Say you have a bandsaw, is it too rough or does it heat up the horn? Or was it just for the sake of making them 'the old fashioned way'?

Hi Daryl being a Carpenter by trade and having a few power tools at my disposal, I also realise that there are many individuals including myself who like to be able to make things without plugging an electric cable into the mains, at the end of the day it's about giving someone the inspiration and confidence to take on these small projects without to much guess work.

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 09-20-2013, 01:14 PM
#13
  • geezer
  • Senior Member
  • Menomonie, Western WI
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A very well photographed and clear exposition. You did a nice job of explanation and work.
~Richard

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 09-20-2013, 08:58 PM
#14
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(09-20-2013, 01:14 PM)geezer Wrote: A very well photographed and clear exposition. You did a nice job of explanation and work.
~Richard

Thanks Richard.

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 09-22-2013, 11:42 PM
#15
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(09-20-2013, 02:15 AM)MikekiM Wrote: Great post Jamie... I have a few blades that need new scales.

What I don't have is the material for the scales. While I have tons of exotic woods I could cut down to size, I really like giraffe bone and blonde horn. I have seen giraffe leg bones for sale, but not sized material.

Also spent some time on Micro Fasteners yesterday, but wasn't able to narrow down what sizes of pins & washers, screws and nuts to order...

Last challenge that has me stalled is sizing the wedge.

Any links that might help with these steps?

Hi Michael,

Regarding sizing the wedge it's a case of doing a dry run a few times with micro nuts & bolts you usually have a few minor tweaks to take care of before you are happy to start the pinning process, another method I use if I'm happy with the fit after the dry run, what you can do to make your life a little easier is using some CA glue glue and clamp the wedge to one side of the scales leave to dry this definitely makes constructing and working the finished scales and wedge a lot easier.

(09-20-2013, 02:28 AM)ben74 Wrote: Wonderful visual tutorial Jamie, you make it look far easier than I believe it actually is, thank-you for sharing!

Thanks Ben.

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 09-23-2013, 07:21 AM
#16
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One thing to note -- if you cut your 2x6" horn blank in half before rough cutting the profile, you might not have enough horn to work with, depending on the shape and size of your scales you design. I always leave my blank in one piece, and draw my scales on it -- it gives you a little wiggle room if the scale shapes you are designing are curvier or wider, and you can save a lot of horn by doing it that way. Just make 100% sure you don't mix up what side is what, if you're trying to make use of the figuring or streaking in the horn for aesthetics. Make sure you mark the blank what will be the insides of the scales and what will be the outsides.

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 09-23-2013, 07:44 AM
#17
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(09-23-2013, 07:21 AM)Undream Wrote: One thing to note -- if you cut your 2x6" horn blank in half before rough cutting the profile, you might not have enough horn to work with, depending on the shape and size of your scales you design. I always leave my blank in one piece, and draw my scales on it -- it gives you a little wiggle room if the scale shapes you are designing are curvier or wider, and you can save a lot of horn by doing it that way. Just make 100% sure you don't mix up what side is what, if you're trying to make use of the figuring or streaking in the horn for aesthetics. Make sure you mark the blank what will be the insides of the scales and what will be the outsides.


To be honest I've never seen a set of scales on any razor bigger than the horn blank of 160mm x 60mm, and even razors like a big 8/8 filly I own which is at the top end when it comes to big scales, and that only measures 6 inches and 3/4 of an inch wide at the widest point, so If you buy that size blank of horn it will easily fit the vast majority of razor you or I will own, and I have made very many custom scales and including book matched wood blanks and horn is one of the nicer and easier materials to work with, and as for saving the horn to be honest I buy them in at those sizes so I'm not really trying to save anything from the horn, but thanks for your input.

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 09-23-2013, 11:55 AM
#18
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Ah. I see - for some reason I thought you were using 6" x 2" blanks (closer to 150x50mm) which is what is commonly available through suppliers here in the states. Guess I didn't realize these were larger. It is occasionally challenging to get sets of scales to fit 150x50mm blanks, especially so if you cut them in half first.

Sorry bout that.


(09-23-2013, 07:44 AM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote:
(09-23-2013, 07:21 AM)Undream Wrote: One thing to note -- if you cut your 2x6" horn blank in half before rough cutting the profile, you might not have enough horn to work with, depending on the shape and size of your scales you design. I always leave my blank in one piece, and draw my scales on it -- it gives you a little wiggle room if the scale shapes you are designing are curvier or wider, and you can save a lot of horn by doing it that way. Just make 100% sure you don't mix up what side is what, if you're trying to make use of the figuring or streaking in the horn for aesthetics. Make sure you mark the blank what will be the insides of the scales and what will be the outsides.


To be honest I've never seen a set of scales on any razor bigger than the horn blank of 160mm x 60mm, and even razors like a big 8/8 filly I own which is at the top end when it comes to big scales, and that only measures 6 inches and 3/4 of an inch wide at the widest point, so If you buy that size blank of horn it will easily fit the vast majority of razor you or I will own, and I have made very many custom scales and including book matched wood blanks and horn is one of the nicer and easier materials to work with, and as for saving the horn to be honest I buy them in at those sizes so I'm not really trying to save anything from the horn, but thanks for your input.

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