09-20-2013, 03:26 PM
#1
User Info
Well, this has nothing to do with shaving. I came across an old post on 'Ordinary find' about a 1953 Royal Quiet Deluxe Portable typewriter, with a mention of how it's fun to think that Ian Fleming's Casino Royale or Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye could have been written on one like it.
[Image: nWlKCwN.jpg]

I liked that thought, and it reminded me of the Hermes portable that I sold about a year ago, like this one:
[Image: HiRGEso.jpg]

I no longer write anything requiring a typewriter, and I don't collect them, but for some reason I really like the old ones. They really are marvels of engineering for their time.

184 12,003
Reply
 09-20-2013, 03:47 PM
#2
  • Jeff
  • Stingraysrock
  • Lakeland, FL
User Info
The two that you have illustrated have a certain romantic appeal... The shapes, the lines... the images of a writer wresting a story from their keys in a smoke filled room and a glass of bourbon within arms reach...

Very nice. Thank you.

1 117
Reply
 09-20-2013, 03:57 PM
#3
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
I have one of these in its original case burried in the back of the closet. Typed many a term paper on it during college many years ago.

[Image: 4p2hthS.jpg]

173 23,546
Reply
 09-20-2013, 06:12 PM
#4
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
User Info
I, too, have an old Royal buried in the back of my closet. It was the Bar Mitzvah gift I received from my parents so that would be early January of 1959. I used it to write my Master's Degree project and while I haven't used it in decades, I cannot bear to part with it.

2 11,211
Reply
 09-20-2013, 07:34 PM
#5
User Info
Wow, gents, those are quite beautiful! Thanks for the pics! Biggrin

75 20,883
Reply
 03-12-2014, 10:01 AM
#6
User Info
I just had to resurrect this thread when I came across this ad for a chart called "A Visual Compendium of Typewriters." There are some excellent images. A little pricey, but signed and numbered.
http://popchartlab.com/products/a-visual...ypewriters

184 12,003
Reply
 03-12-2014, 10:17 AM
#7
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
User Info
Old typewriters are pretty cool.
I have my grandfathers old Underwood Portable that he used in his early career as a newspaper reporter in the LA area.

2 506
Reply
 03-14-2014, 05:49 PM
#8
User Info
LOL, I never did learn to type: but I do remember buying a Selectric for my girlfriend at the time.Biggrin

2 546
Reply
 03-15-2014, 02:18 PM
#9
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
User Info
This Hammond No. 2 was used by my great uncle Ben during his college years (about 1902-1906)

[Image: xh3o.jpg]

47 1,378
Reply
 03-15-2014, 02:36 PM
#10
User Info
(03-15-2014, 02:18 PM)MaxP Wrote: This Hammond No. 2 was used by my great uncle Ben during his college years (about 1902-1906)

Wow, that's a great looking old machine, Max!

184 12,003
Reply
 03-15-2014, 02:56 PM
#11
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
User Info
Max, that's wonderful! Thank you for sharing the photo.

2 11,211
Reply
 03-18-2014, 09:51 AM
#12
  • rsp1202
  • Senior Member
  • Los Angeles
User Info
I learned typing on an old Royal back in school, when there were actual typing classes being offered. Typewriters may be old and difficult to use, but they had panache and were at least as accurate as a modern laptop keyboard (but not as good as an IBM clicky-clack keyboard).

p.s.: I laugh at movies depicting writers typing their stories on a laptop. The must have good copy editors. Smile

20 1,609
Reply
 03-18-2014, 09:59 AM
#13
User Info
(03-18-2014, 09:51 AM)rsp1202 Wrote: I learned typing on an old Royal back in school, when there were actual typing classes being offered.

For awhile I was very angry at my parents for making me take typing classes two mornings a week during my summer vacation when I was about 12 years old. Wasted mornings, in my opinion then. It was almost an bad them making me take ballroom dancing classes every Wednesday night for several months during the next school year.

184 12,003
Reply
 03-18-2014, 10:19 AM
#14
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
User Info
That's a nice looking typewriter Max. I haven't seen such an early one before.
Here's the one I have in the travel case. My guess is that it's from the late 20's or early 30's. The keys and return work well, if I can find a ribbon I could probably bang a few letters out.

[Image: underwood.jpg]

2 506
Reply
 03-18-2014, 11:31 AM
#15
  • rsp1202
  • Senior Member
  • Los Angeles
User Info
It's quite a reawakening to try and type on a manual typewriter after using a computer keyboard for years. It take lots of force to push those keys, but you know when you've done it. Just the opposite on the modern laptop keyboard. Thank goodness for the backspace key. I love the looks of an old typewriter, I love the smell -- the smell of ink and Hemingway's sweat and an old newsroom's cigarette smoke.

Maybe not the sweat thing so much . . .

20 1,609
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)