09-26-2013, 09:21 AM
#1
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Hello Everyone,

I have a nice Frank Shaving acrylic handle with a synthetic knot. Love the handle, hate the knot. So I did the "steam" method of removing the knot and that went well.

Got a TGN Silvertip knot to go in place but I would like to lower the height of said knot.

How do I remove material from the acrylic handle without doing damage to it? Any special tools needed? Any special technique?

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 09-26-2013, 09:39 AM
#2
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You will need an forstner bit of the specific size of the hole diameter. Set it in a drill and remove the desired amount of material to deepen the hole. Smile

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 09-26-2013, 11:15 AM
#3
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Never thought about using an auger bit. I think most people use a Forstner bit, and a regular bit as a pilot.

The forstner provides a flat bottom.

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 09-26-2013, 12:45 PM
#4
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(09-26-2013, 11:15 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: Never thought about using an auger bit. I think most people use a Forstner bit, and a regular bit as a pilot.

The forstner provides a flat bottom.

Yup, that is what I use - a Forstner style bit.

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 09-26-2013, 01:19 PM
#5
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(09-26-2013, 11:15 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: Never thought about using an auger bit. I think most people use a Forstner bit, and a regular bit as a pilot.

The forstner provides a flat bottom.

* Oops, I stand corrected! This is why I don't make brushes and just use them! Blush

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 09-26-2013, 03:12 PM
#6
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I just did one. Ripped out the old knot and lowered my shelf with a flat bottom Dremel bit and mini sanding drum on the Dremel to widen it a touch.

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 09-26-2013, 04:37 PM
#7
  • Rod_Neep
  • Junior Member
  • Gloucestershire,U.K.
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[Image: bantler04.jpg]

A Forstner bit. A little awkward without a drill press, but it can be done with a hand drill if you can hold the handle steady enough. On a ready made handle, take care to pad it well, and don't squash it!

If you want to set the new knot lower, then be aware that the diameter needed for the knot may be a little larger a little way up the knot. The "plug" may be 24mm for example, but the knot itself wont fit all the way down into a deep hole. The trick here is to drill a stepped hole. Go in first with the 24mm Forstner bit to the required depth, but then drill again with a 26mm bit about 1/4" deep.

[Image: z-stepped-hole.jpg]

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 09-26-2013, 06:40 PM
#8
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I've done them that way also Bruce.

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 09-26-2013, 07:06 PM
#9
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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I've done a bunch of restores without a forstner bit. I use a Dremel with a sanding stone and just work the shelf down little by little. If you have a Forstner and a drill press then by all means use that. But off not then a rotary tool with a sanding stone works well enough.

Wise words about knot needing more width than the puck diameter. I add 2mm or so. If I buy a 22 mm knot I usually end up with a 24 mm brush.

Good luck!


Sent using Tapatalk.

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 09-27-2013, 06:07 AM
#10
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There are several tools/bit that I have used:

Standard Drill Bits
Forstner Bits
Auger Bits
Dremel Bits

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 09-27-2013, 06:24 AM
#11
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I used this - I have no idea how it's called in English, but it worked! Biggrin
Dremel bits?!?!

[Image: P1050772.jpg]

You can see my first reknot here. Smile

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 09-27-2013, 06:26 AM
#12
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(09-27-2013, 06:24 AM)oversaturn Wrote: I used this - I have no idea how it's called in English, but it worked! Biggrin
Dremel bits?!?!

[Image: P1050772.jpg]

You can see my first reknot here. Smile

Correct. Dremel Bits!

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 09-27-2013, 07:46 AM
#13
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(09-27-2013, 06:24 AM)oversaturn Wrote: I used this - I have no idea how it's called in English, but it worked! Biggrin
Dremel bits?!?!

[Image: P1050772.jpg]

You can see my first reknot here. Smile

Yep, that's what I mostly use. They are rotary tool bits. Dremel is a popular brand name for the rotary tools sold in US, but they come in all shapes and colors and take mostly the same bits. That grinding stone with a flat bottom is what is very useful for adjusting the shelf. The metal ones are useful for getting the old junk out. I also use the drum sander bits that take different grit sanding cylinders. Those have no abrasive on the bottom and are useful only for sides of the hole. They work real well for that. I adjust the speed way down on my rotary tool as it is way too fast at the fastest setting and melts most handles.

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 09-27-2013, 12:10 PM
#14
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I have done dozens re-knot brushes using common tools
I have no lathe so i work with hands and simple equipment
A common drill for the first hole,a wood drill next and some finish work with dremel bits and sandpapers.

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