10-28-2013, 02:36 PM
#1
  • Lee-
  • Junior Member
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I bought a new straight razor. I realize it is a cheap razor, but it is supposed to be shave ready. I am a complete noob to straight razors. I've never been shaved with one before, but have wanted to give it a try for a while.

Anyway I received the razor today and the blade has a bit of a bump near what I believe is called the heel of the razor. I've marked the area of concern with red lines. I understand this very well may be completely normal, but I haven't noticed this in other images of straight razors I've seen before.

The image can be viewed here:
[Image: CwraIfi.jpg]

Thanks.

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 10-28-2013, 02:57 PM
#2
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I am not an expert on straight razors, but as long as that area you have pointed out is smooth so that there is no chance of scraping or cutting you, you shouldn't have much of a problem as long as the edge is sharp and shave-ready.
If it really bothers you, then you can have a honemeister buff it out, possibly. Good luck.

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 10-28-2013, 05:58 PM
#3
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
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Lee,
It's hard to determine definitely the fault in the blade from your photo. From what I notice with a naked eye, this is a damaged or defective blade. It's also a Gold Dollar razor, a brand liked by few and avoided by many straight razor shavers. If I may suggest, send it back and buy yourself a better razor. Ralf Aust, Dovo, Thiers-Issard, Revisor, as well as restored vintage razors sold on the various shaving forums offer better choices.

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 10-28-2013, 06:49 PM
#4
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Welcome to the world of the Gold Dollar! This is why guys modify them straight from the factory, because the dude who grinds them must look away to text quite often while working. I have had quite a few gold dollars and once dialed in shave just as well as most any other decently priced straight razor. That being said most all of them need the shoulders ground down and the bevel fixed. I would send it back unless your willing to modify it yourself.

Looking at it again I guess you could round that "bump" on a diamond hone or something similar (not a hone that will scratch easily) until even with the rest of the bevel, but after doing so it will be dull. I have done this to other razors, usually with quite a bit of hone wear and it leaves a spike on the back end. You must be very careful (unless you know how to hone)with how far you round as you could end up running the entire bevel on the hone and dulling the whole blade.

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 10-28-2013, 07:15 PM
#5
  • Lee-
  • Junior Member
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(10-28-2013, 06:49 PM)milkylee Wrote: Welcome to the world of the Gold Dollar! This is why guys modify them straight from the factory, because the dude who grinds them must look away to text quite often while working. I have had quite a few gold dollars and once dialed in shave just as well as most any other decently priced straight razor. That being said most all of them need the shoulders ground down and the bevel fixed. I would send it back unless your willing to modify it yourself.

Looking at it again I guess you could round that "bump" on a diamond hone or something similar (not a hone that will scratch easily) until even with the rest of the bevel, but after doing so it will be dull. I have done this to other razors, usually with quite a bit of hone wear and it leaves a spike on the back end. You must be very careful (unless you know how to hone)with how far you round as you could end up running the entire bevel on the hone and dulling the whole blade.

I wouldn't trust myself to try to fix it, but the seller is a honemeister who describes the problems with straight from the factory gold dollars and described this as a customized shave ready gold dollar. Since the seller is an expert in this area, and I am not, I am led to believe that I'm making a big deal about this bump in the blade and that it is in fact perfectly fine to use. It's also possible that it simply slipped past QA, which is why I was looking for feedback from those more knowledgeable than myself.

So at this point I think I'm just making a stink about something that's not really a problem. It is a cheap razor afterall. I didn't expect it to be flawless cosmetically, but I did expert a proper edge. I guess the big question is, is this edge fine to shave with as is (being that it was described as being modified to be shave ready)?

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 10-28-2013, 07:38 PM
#6
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The seller is no expert if he thinks the bump is okay.

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 10-28-2013, 11:23 PM
#7
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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"honemeister" and "expert" are two terms that are too easily thrown around, and too often self appointed Confused

you could get away with shaving with it and just avoid that end of the razor, but that's not an acceptable solution if you paid someone to make a gold dollar 'shave ready'


here's my 2 cents, to do with as you like:
You can find that particular GD Razor for ~$15 on ebay, unmolested (maybe less, I didn't look past the first page of search results).
If you paid more than $30 for it, send it back.
If you paid less than $20, find someone to finish fixing it for you.
Anything between $20 and $30, flip a coin to decide Biggrin

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 10-29-2013, 01:55 AM
#8
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From what I see on a magnified image it's purely a poorly ground gold dollar nothing to unusual about that then, but that small bump at the heel is not likely to go anywhere near your face when shaving, if you feel confident enough clamp the razor in a vice making sure not to damage the razor, then take a dremel and take the small bump off.

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 10-29-2013, 03:03 AM
#9
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Might have missed it... But have you shaved with it yet? How was it?

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 10-29-2013, 06:31 AM
#10
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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Don't take this on too much authority because I'm a noob too.

Lee at Wet Shaving Products deals in Gold Dollar. From what I understand he sorts what he gets from the factory by hand and only sells what he can make shave ready. You might contact him and see what he thinks of this. If he can fix it for you, I'd go that route for sure since he is familiar with the brand.

Or you could try and shave with it a few times and next time it needs honing you could address the issue at that time if it isn't bothersome to you now.

Again, I'm a total noob; just bought my first straight and haven't even received it yet, so take what I say knowing that.

Hope you get it worked out.

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 10-29-2013, 08:35 AM
#11
  • Lee-
  • Junior Member
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(10-29-2013, 03:03 AM)Johnus Wrote: Might have missed it... But have you shaved with it yet? How was it?

I have not shaved with it yet. The bump concerned me, so I thought I should get opinions before attempting to use it.

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 10-29-2013, 10:12 AM
#12
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The heel is a manufacturing issue. You never use it and it never comes in contact with your face.

You will see the same issue with worn down razors with a double shoulder. It's a cosmetic issue, not a functional one.

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 10-29-2013, 11:46 AM
#13
  • Lee-
  • Junior Member
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I just shaved with the razor. First time a straight has ever touched my face and I'll admit I was very concerned about cutting myself (just as I was when i first used a safety razor). Amazingly, I did 2 passes with the grain and didn't cut myself at all (I did a 3rd pass with an injector and got some minor bleeding from the injector). There was a lot of pulling around my chin, but this is usually a problem area due to my hair coarseness and shape in that area. To make it worse, I don't know what I'm doing with a straight razor and was more concerned with not cutting myself than actually getting a good shave.

Going in to this, I thought that straight razors were so sharp that even a slight accidental press of that bump against my skin would cause massive bleeding. Obviously this is not the case. Furthermore, due to the way I held the razor, the heel of the blade does not get close enough to my face for that bump to even touch my skin, so I agree that this is a cosmetic issue, not a functional one. I think perhaps the high resolution of the image may have caused the bump to appear to be much larger than it actually is.

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 10-29-2013, 01:33 PM
#14
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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(10-29-2013, 11:46 AM)Lee- Wrote: I just shaved with the razor. First time a straight has ever touched my face and I'll admit I was very concerned about cutting myself (just as I was when i first used a safety razor). Amazingly, I did 2 passes with the grain and didn't cut myself at all (I did a 3rd pass with an injector and got some minor bleeding from the injector). There was a lot of pulling around my chin, but this is usually a problem area due to my hair coarseness and shape in that area. To make it worse, I don't know what I'm doing with a straight razor and was more concerned with not cutting myself than actually getting a good shave.

Going in to this, I thought that straight razors were so sharp that even a slight accidental press of that bump against my skin would cause massive bleeding. Obviously this is not the case. Furthermore, due to the way I held the razor, the heel of the blade does not get close enough to my face for that bump to even touch my skin, so I agree that this is a cosmetic issue, not a functional one. I think perhaps the high resolution of the image may have caused the bump to appear to be much larger than it actually is.

Awesome Lee. Glad this has worked out for you. You've got me excited for my first shave with mine that is on it's way as we speak. I too thought they were sharp enough to do that so now, I am not so nervous as I was before.

At any rate. Glad that this has worked out and you are happy with your purchase. That is truly what is most important.

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 10-29-2013, 01:42 PM
#15
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Congratulations on your first shave!! Now, that you know that they aren't that precarious, your shaves and confidence should improve. Good luck. Biggrin

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 10-29-2013, 01:42 PM
#16
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They're just as safe as a DE razor when the correct angle is used. If you push into your face too hard, it will cut you. If you move the blade horizontally, it will cut you.

But, if you move the blade in a forwards direction with the proper amount of pressure, it won't cut you unless you go over a bump. In which case, it may slice off the bump...Cool

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 10-29-2013, 02:03 PM
#17
  • Attila
  • The Hungarian Blade
  • Vancouver, Canada
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A key thing to remember is to use a very shallow angle, one to max two spine widths from your face, no more. Unless perhaps getting the area just under the nostril...but you are a ways away from that yet. Focus also on keeping the skin taut, pull it in the opposite direction that the stroke is going. Puff out your cheeks by blowing air in there and holding it. Use decisive strokes but you should not have to force the blade at all.

For beginners, even a shave ready blade can feel not sharp enough until you have the angles down right.

It will get better with practice. Don't worry. Welcome to the wonderful world of straights!

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 10-29-2013, 04:53 PM
#18
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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Excellent tips Lee, and Attila. Thank you guys.

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 10-30-2013, 06:25 AM
#19
  • u2u
  • Senior Member
  • GTA
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(10-29-2013, 10:12 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: The heel is a manufacturing issue. You never use it and it never comes in contact with your face.

You will see the same issue with worn down razors with a double shoulder. It's a cosmetic issue, not a functional one.

You might not use the heel, but I for one, do. The pictured razor with this sort of manufacturing issue would not be usable, in my case, unless I modified my well practiced routine.

The challenge in offering guidance is the tendency to assume the OP uses the same method as the responding poster.

I see in many videos that straight users post, who started after the Internet became an information source styles that mimic barbers manuals. Information intended for shaving someone else's face, not your own. I learned on my own, well before the Internet. My style is very different and a straight that doesn't have the entire cutting length in usable condition is not serviceable. That heel looks to have plenty of potential to contribute to nicks and cuts.

I would do some work on that blade before placing it in service.

Good to see the OP is off to a fair start.

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 10-30-2013, 09:52 AM
#20
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You can't use the heel on any razor with a shoulder. It's designed to be dull. Same with knives. You can't sharpen about 1-2mm of the shoulder without redesigning the blade to be shoulderless.

You can use the area more forward of the shoulder, but that's not what we're talking about.

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