04-22-2012, 06:30 AM
#1
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I've asked this question before on boards but never gotten a satisfactory answer.

Should I moisturize my skin?

I don't like to but I've been doing it for 6 years. Why did I start? I noticed a lot of women were doing it after showering.

But I'm worried about the concept of chemicals on my skin. Surely, the skin is smart enough to pump out natural oils, etc. if the skin is dry.

But will adding more moisture lead to fewer wrinkles, better skin?

That's all I'm after.

Please reply in scientific fashion!

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 04-22-2012, 06:40 AM
#2
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The short answer is, maybe. If you have dry skin, then definitely, but some people have naturally oily skin. Moisturizers, like everything else, are YMMV. I don't have all the answers, but I liked an article from Discovery Health, and they cite sources such as the Mayo Clinic. One thing they do note, however, is if you are using moisturizers to get rid of wrinkles/stretch marks, there is no proof that it will work.

http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-car...arance.htm

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 04-22-2012, 06:43 AM
#3
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+1
Do you have dry skin?
If your worried about wrinkles, there are several things out there. Check out Zihr

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 04-22-2012, 07:12 AM
#4
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I'm 28 and have fantastic skin.

I've been moisturizing since I was 22 for the simple reason that I told it was good.

I find it annoying to apply, above all. What's more, I don't want it to have a deleterious effect on the quality of my skin down the line.

The notion of applying lotion comprising a slew of chemicals on my skin doesn't sit well with me.

But, being a regular guy, I don't know what those ingredients/chemicals are.

When you look at ingredients list on the back of a standard moisturizer bottle, do any of the chemicals cited jump out at you as being unsuited to sit on the skin all day?

Can someone help me put this issue into perspective?!

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 04-22-2012, 07:29 PM
#5
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i am no scientist, but some climates do precipitate dry skin with certain individuals. If you do not need to apply moisturizer, then you should not. If you want to keep your skin toned without all the chemicals, then i would highly recommend unrefined Shea Butter. Completely natural and used by many indigenous people in Africa for that exact reason. i have been using it for years, now, as the winters in Vancouver can be very drying at times, believe it or not, and the Shea Butter has worked brilliantly.
Good luck to you, sir.

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 04-22-2012, 08:57 PM
#6
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I think moisturizing your skin is a case of YMMV - like so many other things in life. Personally I find that applying a bit of balm on my face after a shave helps against irritation, and using lotions on my hands has really helped with cracked skin and brittle nails... I'm not putting moisturizers on the rest of me though; would be like moisturizing a rug to be honest.

I'm picky about what moisturizers I use though - avoiding petroleum based products among other things - and stops using a product if it irritates my skin in any way.

The scientific way to find the answer is to stop doing it and see if your skin gets worse / better. If it gets worse, start applying it again. If it gets better, so not start again Tongue

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 05-12-2012, 11:58 PM
#7
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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SWMBO emphatically states: YES!

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 05-14-2012, 11:07 PM
#8
  • Persius
  • On the learning curve
  • Reading, England
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As an ex-biologist, I always try to think of these things in evolutionary terms. Our species has been evolving over quite a period, and has managed quite well without moisturisers up 'til very recently.

For healthy skin, you really need to have a good diet (lots of veggies, oily fish, etc, etc, avoiding excess alcohol and smoking) and to avoid too much exposure to the sun.

Other than that, it is mainly a matter of genetics: hopefully your parents gave you the right combination of genes for great skin and long, healthy life.

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 05-15-2012, 12:16 PM
#9
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(05-14-2012, 11:07 PM)Persius Wrote: As an ex-biologist, I always try to think of these things in evolutionary terms. Our species has been evolving over quite a period, and has managed quite well without moisturisers up 'til very recently.

For healthy skin, you really need to have a good diet (lots of veggies, oily fish, etc, etc, avoiding excess alcohol and smoking) and to avoid too much exposure to the sun.

Other than that, it is mainly a matter of genetics: hopefully your parents gave you the right combination of genes for great skin and long, healthy life.

What he said...

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 05-19-2012, 03:55 AM
#10
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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In the past I've experience dried, tired skin on my elbows. A trip to the Body Shop and a tub of Body Butter soon ended that.

Part of our evolutionary success is based in embracing advances in science and technology and by adopting them in to our lives. Whether it be medicines, sun cream or moisturises, all combine to ensure the survival of the fittest...

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 05-21-2012, 04:59 AM
#11
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(05-19-2012, 03:55 AM)ben74 Wrote: In the past I've experience dried, tired skin on my elbows. A trip to the Body Shop and a tub of Body Butter soon ended that.

Part of our evolutionary success is based in embracing advances in science and technology and by adopting them in to our lives. Whether it be medicines, sun cream or moisturises, all combine to ensure the survival of the fittest...

So as a non-believer in the evolution theory does that mean I should moisturize or not??? Tongue

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