11-01-2013, 12:16 PM
#1
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For those interest the following is a map of the United States with shading to denote the hardness of water.

[Image: ar122395083354199.jpg]

My area seems to have hard to very hard water. No wonder why my Pur Water filters last about 1/3 as long as advertised before the red light flashes even with only one person using water. They are getting gunked up very quickly.

Source:
http://activerain.com/blogsview/738874/-...ed-to-know-

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 11-01-2013, 12:30 PM
#2
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Interesting.

We have a whole house water softener system ... and I go through 40lb bags of salt fairly quickly!

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 11-01-2013, 01:16 PM
#3
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Ahhhh, the joys of living in a temperate rainforest! Softest water in the world, possibly! Biggrin

Thanks for the map, Gary!

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 11-01-2013, 01:31 PM
#4
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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I didn't realize it was so concentrated in the "middle states" Biggrin
Is this because the source of fresh water is the same?

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 11-01-2013, 02:07 PM
#5
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(11-01-2013, 01:16 PM)celestino Wrote: Ahhhh, the joys of living in a temperate rainforest! Softest water in the world, possibly! Biggrin

Thanks for the map, Gary!

Me too. I just wish I could have well water where I live, instead of city water. And thanks, Gary.

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 11-01-2013, 10:18 PM
#6
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Soft water makes all the difference in the world lathering soaps,creams. I thought it was good before with hard water, mine tested about 14 grains of hardness. Then the softener was installed and all my soaps just got immensely better!

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 11-01-2013, 10:19 PM
#7
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(11-01-2013, 01:31 PM)beartrap Wrote: I didn't realize it was so concentrated in the "middle states" Biggrin
Is this because the source of fresh water is the same?

I'm thinking that it's because that area was, millions of years ago, an inland sea. That means calcium deposits from the support structures of dead animals. They got covered over and when a well is drilled the water comes through those calcium deposits. But that's just an educated guess.

Compare that to Maine where the glaciers came through and scoured everything leaving only granite and glacial deposits. Our water is extremely soft and for all I know I'm using water that seeped in 10s of thousands of years ago after the glaciers. It sure does taste good and lathers great! The skin rinses clear of soap some hard though (Maine lingo). We're in the dark blue area near the top of the dark blue.

20 miles away, a friends well, 60 miles from the sea, is salt water. Another glacial deposit, but this time it's salt water that got trapped. That well is no more than 100 yds from a fresh water lake, but it doesn't affect the well. Drilling a well is a crap shoot.

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 11-02-2013, 03:24 AM
#8
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We recently moved and went from having city hard water to a co-op provided soft water. Now I am curious what it would test out at.

I really don't care for soft water, (I never feel like I've rinsed off), except for it sure does make it easier to lather!

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 11-02-2013, 04:44 AM
#9
  • Coyote
  • Senior Member
  • Hondo, TX USA
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Quote:My area seems to have hard to very hard water. No wonder why my Pur Water filters last about 1/3 as long as advertised before the red light flashes even with only one person using water. They are getting gunked up very quickly.

Me too Gary! I think ours is half limestone. White flakes at the bottom of each glass of water......

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 11-02-2013, 06:47 AM
#10
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One thing I couldn't tell is if this graphic depicts only ground water or water as it is sourced...ground and surface water. I clicked on the link and couldn't find anything to tell me. Many cities around us use surface water, and many use ground water. I would guess that surface water isn't as hard, but I could be wrong.

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