11-05-2013, 08:15 PM
#1
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OK, you might not want to use it if it comes out of polluted air, but rain water is soft.

Has anyone used it for shaving?

I must admit that I haven't and have no intention of using it because my well has incredibly soft water.

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 11-05-2013, 11:26 PM
#2
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My rain water is actually quite dirty due to the high levels of dirt in the air. So, no, I'll not be trying it.

Probably a good amount of pollution too.

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 11-06-2013, 04:38 AM
#3
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Too dirty. However I am grateful for rainwater for another reason. It probably helped discover soapmaking.

Think cooking on a campfire on a slight slope. Ashes, animal fats both spilling downhill. The rainwater through the ashes makes lye. Lye meets animal fat. And the cavemen had soap. Actually using the soap to shave took much longer. Muhle at the time had seven versions of an obsidian razor all called the R1, and the cavemen argued which version they actually where shipped by the brown-haired delivery guy that they barely had time to shave. Billy ignored the fighting and made a funky white puck of the new soap. They stopped arguing about razors and all started arguing whether you can actually make a good lather with Billy's soap. Billy getting older and calling it William's did not help in the least.

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 11-06-2013, 05:04 AM
#4
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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Interesting. I have a rain barrel collecting rain water, but use it to water the garden in dry weather. It is pretty dirty coming out of that barrel, but I think it would be easy to clean up by simply boiling (to get rid of volatiles) and filtering through some rudimentary stone/sand setup. My water is not that hard coming out of the faucet, so I am not going to resort to rain water, but good to know.

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 11-06-2013, 05:05 AM
#5
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(11-06-2013, 04:38 AM)Aimsport Wrote: Too dirty. However I am grateful for rainwater for another reason. It probably helped discover soapmaking.

Think cooking on a campfire on a slight slope. Ashes, animal fats both spilling downhill. The rainwater through the ashes makes lye. Lye meets animal fat. And the cavemen had soap. Actually using the soap to shave took much longer. Muhle at the time had seven versions of an obsidian razor all called the R1, and the cavemen argued which version they actually where shipped by the brown-haired delivery guy that they barely had time to shave. Billy ignored the fighting and made a funky white puck of the new soap. They stopped arguing about razors and all started arguing whether you can actually make a good lather with Billy's soap. Billy getting older and calling it William's did not help in the least.

Laughing1Laughing1

Now that was funny!

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 11-06-2013, 10:47 AM
#6
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Never even thought about it, Brian, as our incredibly soft water, here, gives me no reason to do so, but I know I could collect over 500L a year since it rains so much! Biggrin

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 11-06-2013, 12:14 PM
#7
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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I have a water softener Brian but rain water sounds like a plan.

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 11-11-2013, 10:11 PM
#8
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(11-06-2013, 04:38 AM)Aimsport Wrote: Too dirty. However I am grateful for rainwater for another reason. It probably helped discover soapmaking.

Think cooking on a campfire on a slight slope. Ashes, animal fats both spilling downhill. The rainwater through the ashes makes lye. Lye meets animal fat. And the cavemen had soap. Actually using the soap to shave took much longer. Muhle at the time had seven versions of an obsidian razor all called the R1, and the cavemen argued which version they actually where shipped by the brown-haired delivery guy that they barely had time to shave. Billy ignored the fighting and made a funky white puck of the new soap. They stopped arguing about razors and all started arguing whether you can actually make a good lather with Billy's soap. Billy getting older and calling it William's did not help in the least.

That's great! thanks for the history lesson Smile

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 11-12-2013, 07:20 AM
#9
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Well, for me in my neck of the woods my easy source of softwater would be snow Smile

I'll give it a try once the snow builds up enough and report back.

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