11-10-2013, 09:31 AM
#1
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One of my favourite snacks or light meals is cheese - sometimes with crackers or toast, but sometimes alone.

I eat many kinds of cheese, but I mainly focus on cheddar -- especially aged cheddar.

Luckily, I live close to many farms that make cheddar in-house, and I can get my hands on some really good cheddars.

[Image: cheese-assorted123.jpg]

In general, I like 3+ year aged cheddar, and occasionally I'll get the 8-year aged cheddar.

[Image: 5lb_2lb84_L__94884.1374859876.1280.1280.jpg]

This is very sharp, and has crystals of Tyrosine that give it a bit of crunch. It's a natural part of the aging process. It's not for everyone, but I like the little crunch.

I eat the older cheeses by themselves - maybe eating a bit of bread on the side. I prefer to get the full flavour of the cheese without the complication of a cracker.

Even in a supermarket you can get a really nice cheese, like the Westminster Vintage Cheddar.

[Image: vintage-sq.jpg]

This is not as remarkable as some of the local stuff, but it is pretty nice and it is cheaper. It does have a tendency to mould, but that's not an issue for me.

A nice smoked cheese is good for a change too.

---

Anyone else like cheese? I've focused on cheddar, because that's what I eat mainly, but I do like other cheeses too. Let's hear about your favourites.

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 11-10-2013, 09:34 AM
#2
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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I love cheese. However, I am a bit of an oddball, I typically do not like it "solid" if you will, I mostly prefer it melted or very very warm and close to melting. I do not know why exactly, it just seems to take on a whole new (and better to me) flavor.

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 11-10-2013, 10:56 AM
#3
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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I LOVE cheese. Cheddar, Swiss, Provolone, Gouda, Havarti, Muenster, etc. I am quite happy to just eat it as is, with no accompaniment such as bread or crackers or grated over food.

Many years ago, when I was still teaching, one of the teachers who lived in the suburbs had goats. She would make goat cheese with chopped mildly hot peppers mixed in. It was the first time I had ever had goat's cheese and it was wonderful!

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 11-10-2013, 12:54 PM
#4
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I'm with you Yohann! I'm also a big fan of aged Cheddar. I haven't really taken note of the crunch, but perhaps the aged Cheddars I've consumed are more juvenile that yours.

I tend to prefer a lavash crisp bread or chunks of fresh free formed bread as opposed to a salted cracker. IMO a salad is not as appealing without cheese and I happily add cubes of cheddar, rounds of bocconcini or crumbled feta. However, the best accompaniment IMO is a glass of red wine.

I'm a fan of soft cheeses too. I've moved away from Brie and Camembert somewhat recently, but relish buffalo mozzarella eaten rustically with fresh basil, olive oil and cracked salt or pepper or as a simple ingredient on wood fired pizza.

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 11-10-2013, 12:56 PM
#5
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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In A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge blamed cheese for causing his ghostly night-time encounters. He only ate “a crumb”, and the story may have had a happy ending, but the idea that cheese gives you nightmares still persists. Is there any truth to this?

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 11-10-2013, 12:58 PM
#6
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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The “cheese reaction”.

There is a class of older antidepressants called monoamine oxidase B inhibitors, which reduce the breakdown of chemicals such as serotonin. These drugs can be effective in treating depression, but they have an unusual and very serious side effect. They prevent the breakdown of the substance tyramine, which occurs naturally in cheese. If tyramine builds up it can cause blood pressure to rise to levels high enough to increase the risk of heart problems or stroke.

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 11-10-2013, 01:17 PM
#7
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Oy, I can see it coming now, a new forum section to complement the Café: The Creamery.

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 11-10-2013, 01:32 PM
#8
  • jcmy53
  • Senior Member
  • Cincinnati, OH
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As Wallace says: "I'm just crackers about cheese!"

--
John

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 11-10-2013, 02:00 PM
#9
  • TheMonk
  • Super Moderator
  • Porto, Portugal
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I absolutely L-O-V-E cheese!

I mean, how can you not love a good French aged Comté, a Vacherin Mont d'Or, a Portuguese Serra da Estrela or an Italian Parmiggiano Reggiano? You have to, you just HAVE to! Biggrin

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 11-10-2013, 02:51 PM
#10
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I love cheese, but generally not the mild ones but there are few exceptions to that rule. I generally like them with taste and/or nose. As long as they have character I'm likely to enjoy it alot.

I turned my coworkers on to Limburger and they loved the stuff, as I do. One coworker caught a whiff of it as he inhaled the cracker sandwich and spit it out. I have no idea what he thought we were feeding him; maybe toe jam. Once he realized it was food he liked it.

My problem is that once I taste something, like a fine stilton, I can never be happy back on the farm. Champagne tastes and a beer budget, but I make do.

But it all relates to food in general... That's why I do most of the cooking and make much of our food from the raw ingredients. Yes, I've been known to make cheese as well (MANY years ago). Though lately not aged cheese.

Just ask my wife... I'm as likely to have a plate of cheese and dry sausage with a glass of wine for supper as anything else; and many times do. Or (I'm salivating thinking of it) some limburger, with pickled herring and raw onions and some party rye. I can definitely make a meal of that.

OK, it's time to eat, that definitely got my juices flowing.

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 11-10-2013, 04:50 PM
#11
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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My everyday grazing cheese is Jarlsberg completely on its own; no crackers, no bread, no grapes. When I want to pamper myself I'll indulge in a fine piece of Stilton, possibly accompanied by Port.

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