11-11-2013, 02:45 PM
#1
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OK Veterans, and active military, when and where did/do you serve if it isn't classified? All veterans and active military, not just USA. What was your job, unit, anything you want to write.

What you couldn't discuss previously, you can now.

I'll get it started... '70-'73, MOS 12B2P, for those needing translation, Combat Engineer Parachutist. Too, back then it was a 2 year draft, so if someone served 3 years it was a voluntary enlistment. I was in Dexheim, West Germany a few miles from the Rhine, right in the middle of wine country. We were protecting the frauleins from the Russians about to spill over the border through the Fulda Gap. My company was attached to the 509th infantry and we could quite literally be anywhere in the world within 24 hours with a heavy drop (we were airborne mechanised parachutists and our vehicles and CEVs could airdrop with us too) and almost was during one of the Israeli wars. I was in CoA, 12th Engr Bn, 8th inf Div. We could unass a C130 in 8 seconds and it was an acknowledged record, but not one the army was proud of or probably even acknowledged if they even knew. We did that regularly. That meant sometimes your buddies chute almost opened in your face and we'd try to get distance between us in the air so that you wouldn't land on anothers canopy. That happened. When it did you just walk off the edge quickly before you sink in too far and don't have all your canopy deflate completely.

Back then I was 145# of tougher than nails. We all were in that unit.

Pictures a buddy took of me. It was a sugar beet field. Sugar beets are hard, so think of it as landing on rocks. I have yet to pack my 'chute up and grab my gear. We always jumped with our combat gear (sans ammo). It was easily over 100#. I never weighed myself fully loaded.
[Image: ParaJump.jpg]

Here you can't see my canopy, but you can see the twisted static lines. I'm working to get them straightened out so that I can have a bit of control over my descent and landing. Todays MC1 'chute is far more manueverable with the cut out back panels, but we didn't have them then. It was a jump from a C130 Hercules and I ALWAYS got twisted static lines from the C130; ALWAYS. Tough aircraft, but I hated jumping from it.
[Image: DSC01702small.jpg]

OK, I've written enough. Now it's your turn.

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 11-11-2013, 03:04 PM
#2
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Thank you for your service.

1991-1997, engineer in the USAF. Main assignment was a unit called the 823rd RED HORSE -- an acronym for a deployable combat engineering squadron. We deployed around the world and built stuff.

[Image: DaHzdz7.jpg]

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 11-11-2013, 05:28 PM
#3
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Wow, Brain! Great pics and story!

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 11-11-2013, 05:39 PM
#4
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C Co. 2/75 Ranger Battalion Ft Lewis WA '93-'97.

[Image: nypuza9e.jpg]

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 11-12-2013, 12:38 AM
#5
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Forward observer with the special forces until my luck run out, after rehab I started a new career as military dog trainer/handler and ended up in the demo team.

[Image: z5.jpg]

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 11-12-2013, 05:41 AM
#6
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20 years in the british Army serving in Northern Ireland, Germany, Canada, Nepal, Middle East and UK.

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 11-12-2013, 08:53 AM
#7
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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(11-11-2013, 02:45 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: We could unass a C130 in 8 seconds and it was an acknowledged record, but not one the army was proud of or probably even acknowledged if they even knew. We did that regularly. That meant sometimes your buddies chute almost opened in your face and we'd try to get distance between us in the air so that you wouldn't land on anothers canopy. That happened. When it did you just walk off the edge quickly before you sink in too far and don't have all your canopy deflate completely.

8 seconds is crazy! No wonder you where on top of each other :-) In those days you could do all kinds of crazy s**t, I actually liked the C130, first jump out of a Galaxy was a surprise however (speed). I bet you're still tougher than nails but no longer 145#? ;-)

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 11-12-2013, 10:02 AM
#8
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Joined the RNoAF on January 4th 1993 as a conscript, started at LTBSK (Air Force Technical Officer School) same summer, graduated in '95... and been on active duty since in a wide range of professions - aircraft maintenance, MWR, publications, a bit of recruiting, staff work...

The Norwegian Military consider you to be a "veteran" if you taken a Tour of Duty abroad in a "conflict area" - so having a cushy desk-job with NATO don't count - and my ToD was 12 months as a UN Military Observer in South Sudan from the fall of 2010 to the fall of 2011... a year that I learned a LOT from - both about myself and about working with officers from different nations, most of them non-NATO (and non-western). Got home to a completely different job than the one I left - since we had yet another re-org - but find that I enjoy the new one much, much better than the old one anyway Tongue

[Image: DSCN2212.jpg]
[Image: DSCN2211.jpg]
(For those wondering, I was temporarily given the rank of major when working as an UNMO, per Norwegian SOP)

As a sidebar, it was my deployment to Africa that made me look into alternatives to carts and electric shavers... so if it wasn't for my line of work, I would not be here to tell you about it Wink

PS: for those curious and/or bored, I kept a blog about my life as an UNMO in Sudan / South Sudan.

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 11-12-2013, 10:04 AM
#9
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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I served proudly from 1972-1975. I was stationed in Gershiam Germany with the 6th Support Brigade. My mos was a Cook.

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 11-12-2013, 12:41 PM
#10
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US Navy 1966-1975. Was deployed a couple of times to Viet Nam. Definetly did not like being in Saigon during the Tet Offensive in 1968.

US Coast Guard 1975-1996. Got tired of a lot of things in the USN and was fortunate to work things out so I could go into the USCG without losing time/paygrade/etc. Stayed as long as they would let me and retired as a CWO4.

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 11-12-2013, 01:59 PM
#11
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(11-12-2013, 08:53 AM)Snuff Wrote:
(11-11-2013, 02:45 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: We could unass a C130 in 8 seconds and it was an acknowledged record, but not one the army was proud of or probably even acknowledged if they even knew. We did that regularly. That meant sometimes your buddies chute almost opened in your face and we'd try to get distance between us in the air so that you wouldn't land on anothers canopy. That happened. When it did you just walk off the edge quickly before you sink in too far and don't have all your canopy deflate completely.

8 seconds is crazy! No wonder you where on top of each other :-) In those days you could do all kinds of crazy s**t, I actually liked the C130, first jump out of a Galaxy was a surprise however (speed). I bet you're still tougher than nails but no longer 145#? ;-)

:-) No doubt that no door position contributed to my twisted suspension lines. 8 seconds to empty a C-130 meant that only the first person in the stick got a good door position. That was OK with me since I fought acrophobia with every jump. That's why I jumped actually. So that I could conquer it...OK, control it. I still have a fear of heights, but it's controlled. I never wanted a door position, I'd always hand it to whoever wanted it. A few back in the stick was close enough to the door for me.

When we were on the ground looking up at the following aircraft we could always tell when another unit (like the MPs) had been inserted into our jump. They'd string us out.

Thanks Snuff, mentally tougher than nails - I still have the same "bulldog" attitude I did back then, and the weight has definitely increased. I'm working on that though.

It's good to see the warriors we have on the forum. Thanks gents and allies. I mean that from the heart and I raise a toast to you all. No one can possibly know or even understand unless they where there and did the things that we did and some of us still do.

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 11-12-2013, 11:25 PM
#12
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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(11-12-2013, 01:59 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: It's good to see the warriors we have on the forum. Thanks gents and allies. I mean that from the heart and I raise a toast to you all. No one can possibly know or even understand unless they where there and did the things that we did and some of us still do.

Indeed, you can only know if you have been there, not sure I'll ever understand however. It ain't pretty and lots of those who return are messed up for the rest of their lives.

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