11-21-2013, 06:18 AM
#21
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(11-20-2013, 08:36 PM)lindyhop66 Wrote: I just finished, "Sleeping Dictionary" by Sujata Massey, a historical novel set in India from the 1930's to 1947 and listened to "At Home" by Bill Bryson.

Bill Bryson writes about everything in and around the home, so it leads to talk about wigs, beauty marks, agriculture, mice, rats, the plague, stairs, sewers, Thomas Jefferson, architecture, poverty, taxes, shaving heads, George Beau Brummel, 180 some different kinds of dinnerware, awful table manners, the nursery, the parlor and on and on into every iota of everyday life and the history of why things are the way they are and how they were.

I'm going to have to look up the Bryson book. I've read a lot of his other stuff, and I like his humour.

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 11-22-2013, 04:08 AM
#22
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Just finished The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, next up is Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Taleb.

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 12-19-2013, 05:44 AM
#23
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Well, I finished 'England Have My Bones - TH White' a week or two ago. This is one of my favourite books, and I return to it every year or two. However, the book I was reading was new to me - a first edition. It had apparently never been read through, as the final pages were uncut.

I also read Jane Austen's 'Northanger Abbey'. That was the first time I read that book. It was decent - not her best. It did make me want to get my hands on the 'Mysteries of Udolpho', which plays an important role in the story. So I have that on its way to me now.

Moved on to 'The Diary of John Evelyn'. Evelyn and Pepys kept detailed and important diaries from the time of the Restoration. Evelyn's diary is written from the standpoint of one of the landed gentry, so it is a nice counterpoint to that of Pepys, who started out in slightly more straitened conditions.

Also, I was traveling last week, so I read a lot of pulp fiction - mostly from the 'Dresden Files' by Jim Butcher. Good books. Fun, with a nice twist.

[Image: cdcover_med.jpg]

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 12-19-2013, 05:53 AM
#24
  • Elendil
  • Raggedy man, good night
  • The snow's back.
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I just started reading John Irving's "Last Night in Twisted River." I've read a bunch of his books over the years, starting with Garp, and have never been disappointed.

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 12-19-2013, 06:29 AM
#25
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 12-19-2013, 07:34 AM
#26
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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I'm really enjoying "Washington, A Life" by Ron Chernow. It's very well written and holds my attention. I'm learning a lot about Washington and American history and find it quite intriguing. I've never studied American history, having been educated in the English public (aka private in the USA) school system where the focus was on European and British history and American history was considered a side-show, so I'm learning a great deal from this book.

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 12-21-2013, 07:07 AM
#27
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I just finished Persuasion by Jane Austen. This is another first for me.

It is a really good story, and many be better than her more famous works, though it may be less accessible. I'll return to it more frequently in the future.

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 12-22-2013, 10:58 AM
#28
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Got this yesterday, and started on it today (after some minor restoration work): The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe. This is the book that was mentioned so prominently in Jane Austen's 'Northanger Abbey'.

[Image: e3e70d96-7b4f-45e4-847b-6e3d38e6bc23.jpg]

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 12-22-2013, 11:03 AM
#29
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Well, I have to confess that I am rotting my mind with a post-apocalyptic zombie war novel by Jonathan Maberry. Brains!

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 12-22-2013, 01:50 PM
#30
  • Elendil
  • Raggedy man, good night
  • The snow's back.
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(12-19-2013, 07:34 AM)Rufus Wrote: I'm really enjoying "Washington, A Life" by Ron Chernow. It's very well written and holds my attention. I'm learning a lot about Washington and American history and find it quite intriguing. I've never studied American history, having been educated in the English public (aka private in the USA) school system where the focus was on European and British history and American history was considered a side-show, so I'm learning a great deal from this book.

Chernow is a fantastic biographer of these larger than life figures. I particularly enjoyed Titan, his biography of John D. Rockefeller.

(12-22-2013, 10:58 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Got this yesterday, and started on it today (after some minor restoration work): The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe. This is the book that was mentioned so prominently in Jane Austen's 'Northanger Abbey'.

[Image: e3e70d96-7b4f-45e4-847b-6e3d38e6bc23.jpg]

Great find! I googled the address for the publisher, and it's located across the street from Elfreth's Alley in Philadelphia, the oldest continuously populated residential street in the US.

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 12-24-2013, 05:27 AM
#31
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Bob- That's an interesting bit of trivia...about the publisher.

I considered trying to find a first edition, but they're pretty expensive, and I wasn't sure I wanted the book in my collection that much. Biggrin

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 12-24-2013, 05:57 AM
#32
  • robk
  • Senior Member
  • New Jersey
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Ulysses (plus the 800-page annotation plus some interpretative help on the web). Ask again in three months and I'll probably still be at it.

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 01-06-2014, 04:32 PM
#33
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Just finished 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte. This is continuing on my 'classics' kick. However, it may be a while before I finish my next book, as the vacation is over.

This is a book I last read when I was pretty young, and I remembered very little of it, so it was nice to read it again. Also, I wonder how much I got from the book the last time I read it, as some of the themes require a more mature mind to appreciate.

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 01-06-2014, 04:41 PM
#34
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Read the entire Hunger Games trilogy since Christmas. Most I've read in a couple years at least. Will probably read the Divergent series next.

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 01-06-2014, 05:12 PM
#35
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still reading more boring IT books. I'm also listening to some, which is definitely more interesting and not as boring.

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 01-06-2014, 05:27 PM
#36
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I'm reading a Chinese-gangster-plots-world-takeover thriller by Mark Sullivan called Outlaw. I just read a few pages at bedtime to put me to sleep.

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 01-06-2014, 05:34 PM
#37
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 01-10-2014, 12:23 PM
#38
  • celar36
  • Enjoying Life 1 shave at time
  • London, UK
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(01-06-2014, 05:34 PM)tonsorius Wrote: [Image: AKOPqcf.jpg]

tell me more

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 01-10-2014, 03:54 PM
#39
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Im in school so im reading text books on line

Enviado desde mi SGH-T999 mediante Tapatalk

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 01-10-2014, 04:03 PM
#40
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Woodturning, a Foundation Course Biggrin

I can't wait to get enough practice to turn my own handles

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