11-30-2013, 02:49 AM
#1
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Suavizar las puntas de una brocha de cerda
"Smoothing the tips of a brush bristle"



Has anyone try it ?
Is it appropriate or this will damage the tips ?

Edit: i can not put the link, i have try it it but failed.

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 11-30-2013, 04:16 AM
#2
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I fixed your link.

I have not tried this but see no harm if done gentle like in the video. Not sure it will help break the brush in any better than actually using the brush. The soaking, lathering, rinsing, and drying cycles are what helps to split the boar tips.

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 11-30-2013, 09:44 AM
#3
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Thank you !

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 11-30-2013, 09:50 AM
#4
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This is a process that Semogue (and some other boar manufacturers but not all) uses in their manufacturing process, albeit with a lathe and iron rubbing bit rather than by hand.

Please look at time sequence 0:43 in the link below (takes you to a video) in which this process in being performed at Semogue. The end seen does not cut, but uses friction to induce and accelerate a process called flagging.

http://imagensdemarca.sapo.pt/atualidade...a-semogue/

Boar brushes are pronounced in how they flag. To have a flagged tip is one that has split into thinner shafts to make the tips softer. Natural painting brushes (boar) have a process similar to this applied for well over 150 years that allows the brush tips to hold more paint and to paint in a smoother fashion. Here is a video showing the same process for paintbrushes.





Now not all boar hairs are the same in how quickly they flag. I have noted through experience in handling many different boar knots from different manufacturers that some knots require more flagging effort than others. Some users going the "all natural approach" of letting each shave and drying sequence to do this work on certain boar brushes have noted as long as a year before the brush is broken in enough. Others state that the same brush straight out of the box is totally satisfactory. That is personal preference which is subjective. Flagging however can be easily seen visually so the the level of flagging is a measurable by sizing of the end of the brush, not due to personal preference (subjective measurement).

What this individual (in the OPs posting) is doing is continuing a process that the end user rarely sees or thinks about when buying and using certain brushes. It will not harm the brush. The process just continues the flagging process. Eventually however, the tips are fully flagged which means that the hair ends cannot separate further and the brush will stay at this flag level throughout its life cycle.

Now you know the secret as to why Semogue brushes are desired by many users over other brushes.

P.S. I discovered this while doing a large amount of research into synthetics and integrated some of the information into my article series:

http://sharpologist.com/2012/10/syntheti...art-5.html

Also, thanks to Teiste for making me aware of the Semogue video.

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 11-30-2013, 10:40 AM
#5
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If they aren't cut, all you have to do is soak and dry, soak and dry, soak and dry. A fan speeds up the drying process.

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 11-30-2013, 11:01 AM
#6
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(11-30-2013, 10:40 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: If they aren't cut, all you have to do is soak and dry, soak and dry, soak and dry. A fan speeds up the drying process.

That is why I brought up the term "accelerate a process" because really all that this, and other flagging secrets, do is accelerate a natural splitting process by forcing the very tip to split quick and reducing the time to get to the "fully broken" hair state because the biggest issue, the initial splitting is complete.

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 11-30-2013, 11:09 AM
#7
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Gary, thanks for the information!

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 11-30-2013, 11:32 AM
#8
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Great video GDC !

Wink

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 11-30-2013, 11:05 PM
#9
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
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Gary , great info , my good friend. Thanks !

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 12-04-2013, 02:24 AM
#10
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Before the test

[Image: 16651996il.jpg]

After

[Image: 16651997qb.jpg]

I don't thinκ that the bristles have been damaged.

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 12-04-2013, 04:57 AM
#11
  • mjemec
  • Active Member
  • Slovenia
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Would brushing the brush against a towel for a minute or so have the same kind of effect?

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 12-04-2013, 05:13 AM
#12
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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I break in boar bristles by working the brush gently on the back of my strop while dry or almost dry. It does not have to be a strop, I've done it on the dry clean towel also. Basically anything with a little texture. Be gentle as dry boar bristles can be brittle. This is why it hastens the splitting process. Dry bristle tips split easily. I have also used two day old stubble on my face. That works if your skin can take it. Basically anything that's fairly gentle, but has an effect of agitating the tips. If you do this wet it will take a lot longer. Dry is the way to go if you want to speed up the process significantly. You may break some bristle shafts, it's part of the process.

I have just broken in a Semogue Owners Club 2012 SE with mixed hair knot (50/50 two band fines and boar) after just one shave using this method. I really wanted to the boar bristles to soften up after the first shave and just did a bit of my magic after the brush was almost dry. The next day when it was fully dry many tips were split. After three shaves the brush looks like it's more than halfway to being fully broken in. I do not go crazy with this method as it is a bit intrusive, but I think it's okay to do at first to get the ball rolling.

The method in the video seems to use the same idea. Dry bristles and some tip agitation. It works., but I would be careful to not over do it.

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 12-04-2013, 09:55 AM
#13
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(12-04-2013, 04:57 AM)mjemec Wrote: Would brushing the brush against a towel for a minute or so have the same kind of effect?

I don't think a towel would hurt. Perhaps someone who's got a new boar brush can try it and report back.

I don't have any unsplit knots on hand.

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 12-05-2013, 01:52 AM
#14
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A Semogue seller and tactical user told me that this method does not hurt the bristles.

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 12-19-2013, 11:46 AM
#15
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So when I first saw this video, I thought it was the act of brushing the bristles against a hot curling iron to help dry out and split the bristles using heat and agitation. I have since seen that it was not, in fact, a hot curler, but after thinking about it, I set up a quick trial.

I tried it on one of my boar brushes, and noticed a significant improvement in how soft the brush felt after just one treatment like this (it was a 1305). I wonder if this is a good/bad thing? I brushed it much the same was as in the original video post.

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 12-20-2013, 01:28 PM
#16
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Useful information.

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 12-26-2013, 09:22 PM
#17
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I did it on a new Semogue 2030 with great results. I would guess it cut 2-3 weeks off the break in time. After three shaves and a couple of test lathers...it feels like I have been using it for about a month.

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 12-27-2013, 02:53 AM
#18
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Good !
Another one it the "team".

Wink

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