12-05-2013, 08:55 PM
#1
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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I am really just curious.

Many years ago when I starting shaving "properly," I did enough research to lead me to badger brushes and that was it. Knew nothing about the different badger hair grades other than cost, and for several years I used a Pure Badger (I call those the dark ages Biggrin). Fortunately I have come a long way since then and many excellent (for me) brushes now reside in my den. I still own a Pure Badger brush, and used it the other day to test lather a soap I just got. I couldn't believe how different it felt compared to all the rest of my brushes I use now. Kind of unpleasant actually...

As I'm wrapping up my SBAD for the year, I noticed many reputable manufacturers carry Pure Badger grades in their line up. I have never used one from them, so I was wondering if there's anyone out there that did/does and what your experience was like.

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 12-05-2013, 09:14 PM
#2
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Well I found my first badger brush which was pure hair Muhle I believe. I've tried using it a few times recently and have learned that I ALSO am glad i upgraded. It's much more floppy, and the tips are a bit scratchy. It's nice to come back to every once in a while to appreciate the luxurious brushes that i have in my cabinet.

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 12-05-2013, 09:52 PM
#3
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I DID use a pure. It was a Simpsons Special in Pure. It wasn't a bad brush, I just didn't care for the scritch. :-) Now I have a horse brush and it reminds me quite a bit of that pure.

Pures aren't bad brushes, lots of folks like the scritch. I'm actually sorry I sold it, but not sorry enough to buy another. I have the horse and that one scritchy brush is enough. FWIW the horse actually has more sritch than the Simpsons did.

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 12-05-2013, 10:03 PM
#4
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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I used a cheap Pure from Kent. It was a good brush to me, but it was so long ago, I can't remember what it felt like. Probably wouldn't use it today, not because it's bad, just because I got spoiled Blush

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 12-05-2013, 10:09 PM
#5
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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My very first shaving brush ... several years ago ... was an AoS labeled pure badger.
At the time I chose it because of relatively low price ... it performed well enough but then I gradually got 'spoiled' by better (IMO) brushes.

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 12-05-2013, 10:46 PM
#6
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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I used pure badger brushes by Omega and Rooney for awhile. I had become disillusioned with silvertip brushes that bloomed into amorphous blobs while lathering. I wanted a fanshaped brush that held its shape in use and didn't require excessive density in order to give it backbone. I found these qualities in pure badger.

Note that I lather in a bowl, that these brushes did a fantastic job of lathering, and that I experienced no scritch or scratch painting finished lather onto my skin with these.

When I became aware of Semogue brushes in 2008, having lived in Portugal I had to try one out. The brush I got was a 2015 silvertip brush in standard density. This was the first silvertip brush I experienced that behaved the way I wanted it to and I was gradually won back over to silvertip, though I still use a Semogue pure badger brush (740), too.

- Murray

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 12-06-2013, 03:22 AM
#7
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I use a made Rite 54 in Pure and it's a bit floppy but as good as Best. Go figure. I have the feeling years back 'Pure' might have been what might now be called 'Best' anyway. Who really knows. I don't know what 'Manchurian' is, either. Advertising?? I see 'Manchurian' and 'Two-Band' used interchangeably, too. I have no clue really about the difference. Cost?

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 12-06-2013, 05:36 AM
#8
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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I use a Simpson's Duke 2 in pure and quite like it. It feels a bit prickly, but not enough for me to find it offensive. I keep it in my regular rotation for a change of pace.

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 12-06-2013, 11:26 AM
#9
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I do use two Simpson brushes in Pure, a Duke 3 and a Berkeley.
That said, they are vintage and some other manufacturers might call it best badger.

The other pure I have is a home made TGN black badger, which I like.
That one is on the prickly side of scratchy, or on the scratchy side of prickly.
Fence like tips, so to speak.
Yet I have no issue with it, I like it as it is.

Not a daily driver though.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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 12-06-2013, 09:59 PM
#10
  • LORDBISHOP
  • Lover of the Wet Shaving way of Life
  • Westchester, NY
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First Brush was also an AoS Pure Badger, and I still have it...I use it once every few months just to remind me why all my other brushes are "worth it"...it creates fine lather in a bowl and I truly never feel bad about beating it up a bit, just could never go back to frequent use because of its prickle and poke...right now its best used for breaking in a fresh soap puck and dusting my personal Nook Biggrin

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 12-07-2013, 12:06 AM
#11
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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Thanks for the responses everyone! The Pure Badger that I have now in my den is an old AoS as well. Pretty sure this one wasn't my first, but it could very well be. I do recall specifically buying it because of the price...I figured it was on the lower end of the hair grades but still a badger Facepalm. If I would have only tried a boar at that time, or better yet splurged on a silvertip Wink.

I certainly don't plan on acquiring another one, unless someone can REALLY sell me on a particular one, but it always peaks my interest when I'm browsing online and I see the Simpsons, Rooneys, Kents, Muhles, etc... in that hair grade. I just wonder why they are still being made, and I guess people are buying them enough that manufacturers keep making them Huh.

I never tried a Simpson Pure for example, so I have no idea how it compares to my AoS. It started me thinking...maybe I am missing something and I got unlucky with an exceoptionally bad pure brush...

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 12-07-2013, 02:01 AM
#12
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I use many Pure badger brushes in 20-26mm
Some as is from the factory some by re-knoting
I love them,i can say it's my favourite kind of bristles.

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 12-07-2013, 03:26 AM
#13
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I still have a Kent T-4 in pure from the early 80s. It's very soft, not prickly at all. It's not loaded with backbone but not floppy either. It's actually quite a nice brush, I've just gotten used to more substantial 2-bands.

[Image: QYjs4jZ.jpg]

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 12-07-2013, 09:40 AM
#14
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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Giorgio, Rooney frays the tips of its pure badger brushes, making them less prickly than most others. I think these are among the best new brushes in pure badger.

Strangely enough, when I bought a Rooney Heritage in pure, it didn't have this treatment and for this and other reasons I found the Heritage pure useless.

- Murray

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 12-07-2013, 01:33 PM
#15
  • texquill
  • Olver Warbucks
  • Richardson - DFW area of Texas
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I have 17 or 18 Simpson's brushes in "pure", and they're all in my rotation. Generally, the more modern the brush, the stiffer the bristle. I have a few older (Somerset) pure brushes that are at least as soft as Simpson's current "best" brushes.

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 12-07-2013, 09:19 PM
#16
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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(12-07-2013, 02:01 AM)Doryferon Wrote: I love them,i can say it's my favourite kind of bristles.

Thanks Doryferon! I have to say I think that's the first time I have read the Pure is someone's favorite. That's great to hear and I'm glad you enjoy them Biggrin

(12-07-2013, 09:40 AM)CMur12 Wrote: Giorgio, Rooney frays the tips of its pure badger brushes, making them less prickly than most others. I think these are among the best new brushes in pure badger.
- Murray

This makes perfect sense to me. I had a feeling the well known manufacturers may have a trick up their sleeve with the Pure. I'm sure what they offer is much better than what I have experienced with it.

@texquill: That is a LOT of Pure brushes you have and great news! A few have shared that the older Pures are much softer. I may try and get a hold of one down the road just to satisfy my curiosity. I'm glad to hear that you enjoy them so much Biggrin!

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 12-08-2013, 03:17 AM
#17
  • ben74
  • ADMINISTRATOR EMERITUS
  • Perth, Australia
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Kent label their brushes as Pure, but it's not the same grade of hair that is most commonly associated with the term Pure. The Pure or entry level badger knots are generally all grey or even black. The hair is prickly at the tips and the loft is usually high to compensate for the wiry strength of the individual hairs. Often the tips are cut adding to the sensation of the most moderately priced examples. They are usually not overly stuffed either, as great density would result in an overwhelming exfoliating experience. I've owned quite a few, including AoS, Rooney, Simpson and EJ. They were purchased in the infancy of my BAD and were never my most favoured brushes. They are great on hard soap and provide a lot of sensation. The cheapest with cut tips are to be avoided IMO as the sensation is too much and despite the knot softening with use the tips never appear to change. I persisted with an Acca Kappa Pure with a rather pleasing wood handle. The brush performed admirably and became slowly more comfortable with use, but like the others I ended up letting it go. The softest I owned were Simpson and the prickliest were AoS. If you have sensitive skin or require a soft presentation to the face they may not be the best choice, but if you enjoy an exfoliating type sensation they are likely to be most agreeable.

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 12-08-2013, 07:45 PM
#18
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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Thanks for the info Ben! It appears you reinforced my thoughts that the Pure I have in my den is from the bottom of the barrel, so to speak. I had a feeling this was the case, which prompted my original question. Your description of the cut tips that never quite soften, lack of density, and excellent results on hard soaps are spot on...exactly my experience with my brush.

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 12-09-2013, 04:02 AM
#19
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I read on a forum that Kent labeled their brushes 'pure' due to fact that they contain only badger and are not mixed with any other type of hair.

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 12-09-2013, 06:05 AM
#20
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(12-09-2013, 04:02 AM)Flash G Wrote: I read on a forum that Kent labeled their brushes 'pure' due to fact that they contain only badger and are not mixed with any other type of hair.

That's right, they label nearly all of their badgers as "Pure Badger" (meaning they are indeed 100% badger hair), and regardless of the quality of badger hair used (pure, best, silvertip or other).
You don't have Kent brushes labelled as "silvertip hair" on the handle.

One example is Kent BK8. It's labelled "Pure badger" on the handle, but is, in fact, a silvertip. http://www.kentbrushes.com/shopexd.asp?id=181

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