12-28-2013, 08:09 AM
#1
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
I've had a Rooney 2/1 Finest for about 7 years. Until the beginning of this year it was my only brush, so it had daily use except when I was travelling. At the beginning of this year SBAD took hold of me in a serious way resulting in my brush collection mushrooming to 20. Needless to say, this Rooney has seen very little use over the last year. Because it had been sitting on the shelf for quite some time I decided to give it a good wash and to my horror I see the knot has cavitated seriously. I'm seriously perplexed by this, not to mention being very disappointed, as in all my years (nearly 50) of wet shaving I've not had a brush do this. I haven't changed my lathering technique, as far as I'm aware: exclusively face lathering and using creams 95% of the time. I'm so disappointed with this brush that I've placed it at the back of my shaving cabinet, behind all my other brushes. I've been thinking though that perhaps I should have the brush re-knotted. I know that Rooney Finest badger is no longer available, but there are nearly as good other grades of badger knots available. Am I being too pernickety about what has happened to the Finest knot and thus I should just learn to live with it? I'm on the horns of a dilemma with this one, so I'd appreciate your thoughts.

5 761
Reply
 12-28-2013, 08:21 AM
#2
User Info
Bryan, I'm sorry to hear this about your Finest. I suppose it comes down to whether it impedes the function of the brush in your experience and/or if it's an eyesore to you. Have you tried lathering it a couple times and letting it dry?

Any chance you can post pictures?

47 1,270
Reply
 12-28-2013, 08:24 AM
#3
User Info
Bryan, can you post a picture of the brush?

37 2,973
Reply
 12-28-2013, 08:52 AM
#4
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
[Image: TagzzPk.jpg]

This is the first picture I've posted on TSN and I can't believe how easy it was.

I've used the brush a couple of times since noticing the cavity and it doesn't seem to impair the functioning of the brush. It is, however, a real eyesore for me and a huge disappointment for me seeing how much I paid for the brush.

5 761
Reply
 12-28-2013, 10:52 AM
#5
User Info
Hmm, that is a cavity and one I'm concerned may not be able to be fixed. Have you tried gently combing the brush when it is dry? I don't really think that will fix it; just trying to give it every chance possible.

47 1,270
Reply
 12-28-2013, 01:03 PM
#6
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
(12-28-2013, 10:52 AM)kentclark Wrote: Hmm, that is a cavity and one I'm concerned may not be able to be fixed. Have you tried gently combing the brush when it is dry? I don't really think that will fix it; just trying to give it every chance possible.

I've combed it a couple of times. What I found was numerous, small, broken hairs so I decided not to comb it again.

5 761
Reply
 12-28-2013, 01:17 PM
#7
User Info
Oich... Never seen this before.
Looks ugly.

Still, I'd be tempted to see what a regular use would do for it.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

0 641
Reply
 12-28-2013, 01:53 PM
#8
User Info
Gosh, I'm afraid that knot is toast. I'm not aware of a way to recover a knot in that condition. I would be interested to know if any experts can weigh in.

Then the question may be: what knot to restore with? (Recognizing that the final product will be different than the original).

47 1,270
Reply
 12-28-2013, 05:06 PM
#9
User Info
Wow, Bryan! That is a very unfortunate incident!
Hadn't you noticed anything before while using it? It seems incomprehensible that this cavity would just suddenly appear! I can't even imagine what could have caused this....so suddenly.
Best of luck to you and that is a big dilemma.

75 20,883
Reply
 12-28-2013, 08:42 PM
#10
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
(12-28-2013, 05:06 PM)celestino Wrote: Wow, Bryan! That is a very unfortunate incident!
Hadn't you noticed anything before while using it? It seems incomprehensible that this cavity would just suddenly appear! I can't even imagine what could have caused this....so suddenly.
Best of luck to you and that is a big dilemma.

I did notice it before, but it was only when I washed and combed it that it fully came to the fore; prior to that it just looked a bit thin in the centre.

5 761
Reply
 12-28-2013, 09:30 PM
#11
User Info
I hate to be the one to mention this, but that looks like typical long term brush damage from brush mashing. Typically the center of the brush has broken hairs and develops that "missing in the center" look.

But only you can know for sure. Pay attention in the mirror when you're lathering. If you aren't using just the first 1/3 of the length of the bristles you're using too much pressure. If that's what it is you aren't alone in that. YouTube had lots of examples of brush mashers. There is only one solution, and that's to use less pressure. Pay attention when you lather and force yourself to not mash the brush. Or live with the habit and know that you'll eventually be changing out knots.

Can it be reknotted? Of course. TGN sells some really fine quality knots. There are other retailers of knots as well but I have no experience with them.

One other thing I can suggest if you are mashing. Try a horse brush or a big synthetic. They have more push back and that feedback might help you feel what you're doing. A horse especially might give the scrubby feel you might be seeking by mashing.

32 6,311
Reply
 12-28-2013, 09:54 PM
#12
User Info
Bryan, I can relate to how you feel. If I had a brush that did that I would also consider it too much of an eyesore to keep, even it it still performed well. Unfortunately, you can't send it back to its maker, as you can do with a Simpson or
Shavemac.

Does the handle hold any special significance to you? If it does, then maybe re-knotting should be considered. If the handle doesn't hold any special significance to you, then maybe letting it go should be considered. Once you re-knot the brush do you still have a Rooney?

37 2,973
Reply
 12-28-2013, 09:54 PM
#13
User Info
Agreed, Brian. And that's a great suggestion to remedy by looking into a ("3rd generation") synthetic or horse hair brush; hopefully avoiding the situation via the greater tactile feedback, "scritch."

47 1,270
Reply
 12-28-2013, 10:10 PM
#14
User Info
(12-28-2013, 08:42 PM)Rufus Wrote: I did notice it before, but it was only when I washed and combed it that it fully came to the fore; prior to that it just looked a bit thin in the centre.

Bryan, again, my condolences to you regarding the brush. Could it have been the previous owner(s) contributing to this problem? Depending on how old the brush is and how many other owners it had, it could have already been damaged before it got to you.
Best of luck with whatever you decide.

75 20,883
Reply
 12-29-2013, 05:22 AM
#15
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
I've never thought of myself as a"brush masher", but I'll pay more attention to my technique in future. As I've said, I lather on my face exclusively using a circular motion in the main, but I'll try more of a back and forth motion here on in. I'm not overly hung up on my brushes having a lot of backbone or a believer in exfoliation, thus changing my technique shouldn't be too much of a challenge. I'm the original owner of the brush and therefore can blame only myself for its demise. I'm not particularly attached to the handle; I like the PJ-style, but it's not particularly special to me, so re-knotting may not make much sense financially; I'd rather save my pennies and get a Simpson's M7 in 2-band when I think about it.

5 761
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)