01-16-2014, 07:22 PM
#1
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One of my favorite brushes is a Vulfix, known to be "floppy," which suggests less backbone than a more sturdy brush. Not that I have an entire arsenal of brushes like some of you, but I manage to have a few different styles of brushes, ranging from more sturdy to my floppy Vulfix. I rotate them, but I always seem to come back to the floppy.

Anyone else like those soft, luxurious, melt-on-your-face floppy brushes?

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 01-16-2014, 07:38 PM
#2
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While I don't like 'floppy' as a rule, I don't like too much backbone.

I like the WSP Monarch HMW for a nice soft face lathering brush.
Simpson 58 in best...if I had something between the two it would be great.

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 01-16-2014, 07:54 PM
#3
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Both nice looking brushes. And I especially like the handle on the Simpson, and it also seems like either a hybrid or fan-type brush. Is the Simpson the sturdier of the two?

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 01-16-2014, 08:05 PM
#4
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I am all over the place. Basically, I decide what kind of brush to use each morning and it ranges from black badger to HMW to two band to floppy Kents and Vulfixes. Each brings something interesting to the bowl and each has earned its place in the cabinet. A Vulfix was my first brush, long before I joined BB, SMS or TSN, and will be there until the end. Great brushes IMO.

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 01-16-2014, 08:13 PM
#5
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I know what you mean about being all over the place. I think that is part of the charm of shaving. I do the same thing with brushes and soaps--I have an extensive collection of soaps and creams and each morning I debate with myself about what to use, "Ok, I think I want a face lather with a Bay Rum. Hmm, but I just used that two days ago. Maybe I'll get a creamy lather with that lime cream. Then again, I just bought..." I only have a few brushes. Thank god! I'd never get out of the bathroom in the morning!

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 01-16-2014, 08:37 PM
#6
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Personally, I really don't like these floppy brushes as I face-lather, exclusively, and I enjoy brushes with strong backbone with very soft tips. I really enjoy my WSP Stubby 2-bands that I have and, especially, the WSP Manchurians. Smile

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 01-16-2014, 11:48 PM
#7
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I like soft, but not flops. Currently the brush hitting those characteristics best for me is the Mühle Black Fibre knot, especially when you can get the loft set just a couple mm lower. Even the stock loft if really nice IMHO.

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 01-17-2014, 03:54 AM
#8
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(01-16-2014, 07:54 PM)Cirques Wrote: Both nice looking brushes. And I especially like the handle on the Simpson, and it also seems like either a hybrid or fan-type brush. Is the Simpson the sturdier of the two?

Yes it is. And I wouldn't call the WSP Monarch HMW floppy (floppy was my first restore Dodgy) I was just eluding to where my sweet spot would be. My M&F Emillion 1 might have been that brush if it was bigger size.

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 01-17-2014, 04:22 AM
#9
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(01-16-2014, 07:22 PM)Cirques Wrote: One of my favorite brushes is a Vulfix, known to be "floppy," which suggests less backbone than a more sturdy brush. Not that I have an entire arsenal of brushes like some of you, but I manage to have a few different styles of brushes, ranging from more sturdy to my floppy Vulfix. I rotate them, but I always seem to come back to the floppy.

Anyone else like those soft, luxurious, melt-on-your-face floppy brushes?

I generally like soft tips with medium backbone, lately I've been very impressed with TGN two band finest in bulb. They pair very nicely with artisan handles Heart

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 01-17-2014, 05:00 AM
#10
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Thank you.

Vulfix has been one of the world's leading shaving brush brands since the early 50's.

They must be doing something right over there on that rocky outcrop Wink

(01-16-2014, 07:22 PM)Cirques Wrote: One of my favorite brushes is a Vulfix, known to be "floppy," which suggests less backbone than a more sturdy brush. Not that I have an entire arsenal of brushes like some of you, but I manage to have a few different styles of brushes, ranging from more sturdy to my floppy Vulfix. I rotate them, but I always seem to come back to the floppy.

Anyone else like those soft, luxurious, melt-on-your-face floppy brushes?

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 01-17-2014, 06:08 AM
#11
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I like variety... some of my badger brushes are what some people may consider "floppy", yes, like some silvertip models by Rooney, Semogue or Kimson. And I like them very much

Haven't tried a Vulfix badger yet. But the day will come, I'm sure of that.

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 01-17-2014, 09:14 AM
#12
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I also enjoy variety, and have a couple of floppy brushes including a Parker Slivertip and a Muhle Sophist Silvertip. There are times when I just look forward to the pillowy tips and other times when I reach for a pure to feel some scritch! I have found the soft, floppier brushes are excellent when your skin is in repair mode, especially the day following a soap or cream that burned my face or having exacted too much pressure with a DE razor!

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 01-17-2014, 10:09 AM
#13
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I too like variety. Even my Rooney/M&F Finests, which make up the majority of my brush collection now, have a wide range of characters. And the old Simpson Manchurian PL14 I used this morning might almost be considered floppy, but it is wonderfully luxurious.

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 01-17-2014, 10:24 AM
#14
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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I have a vintage pewter handled Rooney in best which is very soft, borderline floppy. It can be used for face lathering but really excels at bowl lathering. I have another vintage brush from Trumper (I.B.8), made by Vulfix, which is even softer and is very enjoyable to be used with bowl and cream. These two are exceptions to my normal tastes, but it is nice to change things up every once in a while, otherwise my entire collection would be 2-band and short lofted best/silvertip.

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 01-17-2014, 11:34 AM
#15
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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I'll echo Celestino and Dave in the'Couv/blzrfn and say that it probably depends on how you use your brush. I lather in a bowl and my lathering technique calls for a decidedly fanshaped brush with some flex in the bristle. I also prefer a brush with lower density because it lathers more efficiently. A Vulfix Super is ideal in this sense.

Simpson brushes, in contrast, are lovely, but they are too densely packed for my needs and I see them as better optimized for face-lathering.

- Murray

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 01-17-2014, 01:43 PM
#16
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(01-17-2014, 09:14 AM)Rockford Wrote: I also enjoy variety, and have a couple of floppy brushes including a Parker Slivertip and a Muhle Sophist Silvertip. There are times when I just look forward to the pillowy tips and other times when I reach for a pure to feel some scritch! I have found the soft, floppier brushes are excellent when your skin is in repair mode, especially the day following a soap or cream that burned my face or having exacted too much pressure with a DE razor!

Exactly! What I find interesting is the different feel of brushes, and not necessarily by the "grade" used by a manufacturer. For example, a "silvertip" is known to be very soft. But my silvertip (I only have one) when compared with a superbadger, like my brush from Vulfix, or even a two-band made for me by New Forest, the superbadger, is not nearly as soft. And it's not even the density of the hair: The New Forest is much denser, one of their Chubby's with a fan shape, and yet it is firm and has buttery soft tips. Mind you, my Silvertip is not a Simpsons, or one of the better makers....hmmm....maybe its not ever a real Silvertip! That is what I first feared when I first bought it, "This is a silvertip?!"

How do all of you find your sivertips? Do they live up to the soft hype? I would like another brush, but not scratchy.

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 01-17-2014, 03:13 PM
#17
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(01-17-2014, 01:43 PM)Cirques Wrote: Exactly! What I find interesting is the different feel of brushes, and not necessarily by the "grade" used by a manufacturer. For example, a "silvertip" is known to be very soft. But my silvertip (I only have one) when compared with a superbadger, like my brush from Vulfix, or even a two-band made for me by New Forest, the superbadger, is not nearly as soft. And it's not even the density of the hair: The New Forest is much denser, one of their Chubby's with a fan shape, and yet it is firm and has buttery soft tips. Mind you, my Silvertip is not a Simpsons, or one of the better makers....hmmm....maybe its not ever a real Silvertip! That is what I first feared when I first bought it, "This is a silvertip?!"

How do all of you find your sivertips? Do they live up to the soft hype? I would like another brush, but not scratchy.

Well, not all silvertip is equal. Top brands use top quality.

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 01-17-2014, 04:20 PM
#18
  • Fab
  • Active Member
  • New York, NY
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I agree with Murray. I think it all depends on how you want to use the brush. Face or bowl. I particularly like bowl so my brushes tend to be bigger with less backbone and very soft. Or floppy. I like to control my lather and not have it all in my brush. Also I prefer to paint, instead of circular motion. For that purpose, Vulfix super badgers work very well. I have a 2235, one of my first, and still one of my favorites.

Sent from my BlackBerry 9930 using Tapatalk

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 01-17-2014, 06:10 PM
#19
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While I generally prefer solid backbone, I'm learning to enjoy variety. My new Plisson HMW bends / flows more then my other brushes, but handles circular strokes well and crushes paint stokes with softness. Possibly my favorite now.

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 01-17-2014, 06:13 PM
#20
  • JRod22
  • Junior Member
  • Baltimore
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I'm a face latherer. As soon as I feel a floppy brush I put it down and get rid of it. Have owned a couple but always give them away. But I understand this is a personal preference type of thing that is also influenced by my preference for face lathering. To each his own , next time I encounter a floppy brush I know who to pass it along to.

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