01-27-2014, 09:20 PM
#1
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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I have just reviewed Mr. Razor's website as it relates to the New varieties of open combs. Nowhere did I see the term "long comb" or "short comb." What I did see were numerous variations of open comb razors, some with longer and some shorter combs. However, in addition to comb-tooth length there were many variations of other features of the heads of New razors. A quick glance at the site will confirm this.

My questions is whether or not the terms long comb and short comb are bona fide Gillette designations or are they collectors' invented and oversimplified generalizations. Right now I am leaning toward the latter. What say you?

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 01-28-2014, 01:39 AM
#2
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Well... probably they are simplistic nomenclatures, adopted by the people who use and collect them.

Have you thought about the "Fatboy" terminology, generally applied to the razor advertised as "Gillette 195 Adjustable"? It's the same thing.

The main difference between LC and SC is the size of the tooth comb, of course, but that reflects greatly on the way they shave - much more than a different handle, or other characteristic. So, It is a simple way to differentiate them.

Another issue: NEWs can be very different, depending on the location where they were made. As an example, British NEWs are somewhat different (generally) than the American NEWs. Joachim (aka Mr Razor) puts them all together in his great website. But the terminology LC and SC is generally applied to the American NEWs, because British NEWs are almost all LC's (with only a few exceptions).

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 01-28-2014, 10:30 AM
#3
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(01-28-2014, 01:39 AM)oversaturn Wrote: Well... probably they are simplistic nomenclatures, adopted by the people who use and collect them.

Have you thought about the "Fatboy" terminology, generally applied to the razor advertised as "Gillette 195 Adjustable"? It's the same thing.

The main difference between LC and SC is the size of the tooth comb, of course, but that reflects greatly on the way they shave - much more than a different handle, or other characteristic. So, It is a simple way to differentiate them.

Another issue: NEWs can be very different, depending on the location where they were made. As an example, British NEWs are somewhat different (generally) than the American NEWs. Joachim (aka Mr Razor) puts them all together in his great website. But the terminology LC and SC is generally applied to the American NEWs, because British NEWs are almost all LC's (with only a few exceptions).

* Great detailed explanation, Emanuel! Biggrin

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 01-31-2014, 07:18 PM
#4
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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I agree Emanuel, it is just disturbing to me that widely used terms such as short comb or long comb are not very meaningful or descriptive.

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 02-01-2014, 04:17 AM
#5
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(01-31-2014, 07:18 PM)Teddyboy Wrote: I agree Emanuel, it is just disturbing to me that widely used terms such as short comb or long comb are not very meaningful or descriptive.

Well, actually the short-comb/long-comb names are descriptive, as they let you know what type of comb the razor has. The names are meaningful too, as people consider the long comb to be milder than the short comb, so they know what they're getting.

It isn't useful when you're trying to figure out which model you have, though.

Gillette's model names are useful to know if you're a collector, but they're confusing if all you want is a short or long-comb NEW.

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 02-01-2014, 08:12 AM
#6
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
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If Gillette didn't make a distinction between the two versions in marketing then how did the consumer know that one was milder than the other? Did they sell on the same shelf next to each other in similar packaging, or did the change come in manufacturing after a certain year?
For example the blue-tip and red-tip Superspeeds were specifically marketed to people with light and heavy beard types.

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 02-01-2014, 09:07 AM
#7
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I don't know how the different NEW's were marketed. The blade gap and exposure on the long and short comb NEW is the same, but people seem to find the short comb a bit more efficient. In my hands, they were about the same.

My favourite general model is the NEW Deluxe, of which I like the UK Belmont best.

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 02-01-2014, 01:10 PM
#8
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(02-01-2014, 08:12 AM)vuk Wrote: If Gillette didn't make a distinction between the two versions in marketing then how did the consumer know that one was milder than the other? Did they sell on the same shelf next to each other in similar packaging, or did the change come in manufacturing after a certain year?

Probably the second option. Several heads released along the years, perhaps? But I may be wrong.
Also different markets had different models available - a good example are the Brit. NEWs that I've talked about, they were somewhat different than their american cousins.

(02-01-2014, 04:17 AM)yohannrjm Wrote:
(01-31-2014, 07:18 PM)Teddyboy Wrote: I agree Emanuel, it is just disturbing to me that widely used terms such as short comb or long comb are not very meaningful or descriptive.

Well, actually the short-comb/long-comb names are descriptive, as they let you know what type of comb the razor has. The names are meaningful too, as people consider the long comb to be milder than the short comb, so they know what they're getting.

It isn't useful when you're trying to figure out which model you have, though.

Gillette's model names are useful to know if you're a collector, but they're confusing if all you want is a short or long-comb NEW.

I fully agree with Yohann's words!

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