04-30-2012, 12:44 PM
#1
  • Songwind
  • Soap Slinger & Scuttle Pusher
  • Burnsville, MN
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My daughter got a new shaving brush from for her birthday from someone or other. Tongue It came with a stand. I decided to try it out.

It's a bit small for a couple of my brushes, so I will be getting a different model, but it did seem to dry my brush more thoroughly. I'm moderately concerned over the new Semogue's wooden handle, and I have my eye on some other wood handle brushes.

The point of this post though, is this: it took about 1.5 times as long to dry while hanging! I was kind of surprised by that. Does anyone else have the same experience?

It occurred to me that it could simply be that there was still water way down in the not before when I thought of it as dry, and that gravity was pulling it out to the tips now. I just wanted to know if anyone else had noticed the same thing?

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 04-30-2012, 12:49 PM
#2
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Someone did a fairly scientific test on this before by essentially weighing their brush before and after an overnight drying period over a fairly lengthy period of time both hung and standing. His results were that the brush dried faster (by weight) when left standing up. How conclusive that is is debatable, but it was a fairly well done test.

I have also seen where some brush manufacturers suggest this although they seem to have strange suggestions at times. I have no idea how it really works but I do not have a stand for my brushes.

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 04-30-2012, 01:26 PM
#3
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(04-30-2012, 12:49 PM)TallyShave Wrote: His results were that the brush dried faster (by weight) when left standing up.

I have seen this comment before and read many different opinions on capillarity. I do not doubt capillary action, it works. Whether it works more quickly than good old gravity is still up for grabs in my mind. I have not done any scientific tests but my experience (perhaps simple hard headedness) has simply been that my brushes are thoroughly dried more quickly when left hanging. It's not a huge deal either way when multiple brushes are used in rotation but it is worthy of consideration when using only one brush day after day. This all said, I hang my brushes.

Of course, YMMV.

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 04-30-2012, 02:05 PM
#4
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this thread title made me afraid to look. I'm glad no one posted any pics.

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 04-30-2012, 02:06 PM
#5
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Well, I for one don't have a scientific answer, but mine dry brush up. My thought is that water dissipates upward, not down. So a good shake and swipe across a towel with sitting on the window ledge, works better than hanging.

Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright?

Just a thought.

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 04-30-2012, 02:10 PM
#6
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(04-30-2012, 02:06 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright?

Just a thought.

You mean all those old wooden handles that have split? Biggrin

One of my memories from a barbershop that my father took me to, some 35 years ago was a wall of shaving mugs with men's names on them and a brush hanging by the side each mug (these were a matched set). I was only there for hair cuts but I remember the wall well. Apparently the regular clientèle would come in and get a first rate shave with their own mug and brush. I'm certain that those who had a place on the wall felt endeared to the establishment. My point here is that these brushes were hanging. I guess it goes both ways.

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 04-30-2012, 02:39 PM
#7
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(04-30-2012, 02:10 PM)GearHead_1 Wrote: [quote='PanchoVilla' pid='26401' dateline='1335823584']
Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright?

Just a thought.

eta: Agreed, it probably does go both ways.

You mean all those old wooden handles that have split? Biggrin

One of my memories from a barbershop that my father took me to, some 35 years ago was a wall of shaving mugs with men's names on them and a brush hanging by the side each mug (these were a matched set). I was only there for hair cuts but I remember the wall well. Apparently the regular clientèle would come in and get a first rate shave with their own mug and brush. I'm certain that those who had a place on the wall felt endeared to the establishment. My point here is that these brushes were hanging. I guess it goes both ways.

Gearhead, you're not saying old wood doesn't eventually split? Have you ever compared old 'barn wood to the new? It eventually happens.

I remember my dad taking me to our local barber to teach me the care and use of a strait (dad was working too hard). I spent many hours there. His brushes were standing on a marble ledge with a full length mirror behind; but then I came from a small town without much money.

eta: WADR, it does go both ways my friend. [Image: _cheers__by_Stream_Sun.gif]

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 04-30-2012, 03:31 PM
#8
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Facepalm Am I a nerd or what!?

Standing brushes on end has always made sense to me, so the only brush I have hanging is one that can't stand on end. There is a pretty good reason for that.

Nitrogen is the principle constituent of air at 80% thereabouts if I remember rightly. It has an atomic weight of 7 but it exists as a molecule, N2, so that gives it an atomic weight of 14. Oxygen has an atomic weight of 8 and 2 atoms of hydrogen contribute an atomic weight of 2 for a molecular weight of 10 for a molecule of water (H2O). N2 has a weight of 14, so water vapor rises as it evaporates since it's lighter than "air" . Hanging a brush impedes the water vapor leaving the brush IMO - the brush itself gets in the way. So stand it on end and let that water get away from the brush easily.

Shake it off or use one of the microfiber water "sponges" (like Shamwow or a MF chamois) to get the majority of the water out of the brush then just stand it up.

If the brush has good air circulation around it it probably doesn't make any difference if it hangs or not.

But it's your brush so do what you want with it. If you want to stand it on end though I just gave you a scientific reason to explain why it's a good idea. Sounds good anyway, huh? Baffle 'em with bull----! Biggrin

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 04-30-2012, 03:41 PM
#9
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(04-30-2012, 03:31 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Facepalm Am I a nerd or what!?

Standing brushes on end has always made sense to me, so the only brush I have hanging is one that can't stand on end. There is a pretty good reason for that.

Nitrogen is the principle constituent of air at 80% thereabouts if I remember rightly. It has an atomic weight of 7 but it exists as a molecule, N2, so that gives it an atomic weight of 14. Oxygen has an atomic weight of 8 and 2 atoms of hydrogen contribute an atomic weight of 2 for a molecular weight of 10 for a molecule of water (H2O). N2 has a weight of 14, so water vapor rises as it evaporates since it's lighter than "air" . Hanging a brush impedes the water vapor leaving the brush IMO - the brush itself gets in the way. So stand it on end and let that water get away from the brush easily.

Shake it off or use one of the microfiber water "sponges" (like Shamwow or a MF chamois) to get the majority of the water out of the brush then just stand it up.

If the brush has good air circulation around it it probably doesn't make any difference if it hangs or not.

But it's your brush so do what you want with it. If you want to stand it on end though I just gave you a scientific reason to explain why it's a good idea. Sounds good anyway, huh? Baffle 'em with bull----! Biggrin

"If the brush has good air circulation around it it probably doesn't make any difference if it hangs or not."

Excellent point. If there is a difference in water retention would that difference exist after approximately 24 hours? I don't think it would in any level to cause detriment to a brush either short or long term.

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 04-30-2012, 04:03 PM
#10
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(04-30-2012, 03:31 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I just gave you a scientific reason to explain why it's a good idea. Sounds good anyway, huh?

It's scientific all right but never the rationale I've heard associated with the drying of a brush. It's worthy of consideration. Most of the reasoning that I've read behind this was to do with capillary action. A little of this theory, a little of that theory, pretty soon we'll have a brush that's dry the second it's been rinsed. Biggrin

As far as a brush being made to stand, the reason for this may be as simple as giving you a way to set the brush between passes. I'm not sure a flat bottom necessarily indicates that this method is superior when it comes to drying. As has been mentioned, there are a number of brushes manufactured today that are designed with hanging only in mind. I'm assuming that this means these brushes won't self destruct in so doing. The guys that make the brush stands are banking on it.

I hope my posts haven't come across as if I take this too serious, trust me I don't. Truth is, I hang it and don't give it a second thought. Darnedest thing, the next time I pick it up it's dry. It's a shave brush do what makes you happy.

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 04-30-2012, 04:16 PM
#11
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(04-30-2012, 03:31 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Facepalm Am I a nerd or what!?

Standing brushes on end has always made sense to me, so the only brush I have hanging is one that can't stand on end. There is a pretty good reason for that.

Nitrogen is the principle constituent of air at 80% thereabouts if I remember rightly. It has an atomic weight of 7 but it exists as a molecule, N2, so that gives it an atomic weight of 14. Oxygen has an atomic weight of 8 and 2 atoms of hydrogen contribute an atomic weight of 2 for a molecular weight of 10 for a molecule of water (H2O). N2 has a weight of 14, so water vapor rises as it evaporates since it's lighter than "air" . Hanging a brush impedes the water vapor leaving the brush IMO - the brush itself gets in the way. So stand it on end and let that water get away from the brush easily.

Shake it off or use one of the microfiber water "sponges" (like Shamwow or a MF chamois) to get the majority of the water out of the brush then just stand it up.

If the brush has good air circulation around it it probably doesn't make any difference if it hangs or not.

But it's your brush so do what you want with it. If you want to stand it on end though I just gave you a scientific reason to explain why it's a good idea. Sounds good anyway, huh? Baffle 'em with bull----! Biggrin
SD, my point exactly. Well put.

Are you really a nerd, or do just you have a pen holder in your shirt pocket? Just kidding, just kidding. Tongue

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 04-30-2012, 05:05 PM
#12
  • Johnny
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  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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To each his own. I was taught to hang brushes. Everything from paint brushes to shaving brushes. So that's the way I do it and it has served me well for over 50 years.

The brush I used this morning will be completely dry tomorrow morning.

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 04-30-2012, 07:09 PM
#13
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I shake most of the free water out, towel off the knot, wipe the handle down, and stand it up to dry. I find my brushes are fully dry the next morning, within 24 hours, more or less.

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 04-30-2012, 07:16 PM
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(04-30-2012, 12:49 PM)TallyShave Wrote: Someone did a fairly scientific test on this before by essentially weighing their brush before and after an overnight drying period over a fairly lengthy period of time both hung and standing. His results were that the brush dried faster (by weight) when left standing up. How conclusive that is is debatable, but it was a fairly well done test.

I have also seen where some brush manufacturers suggest this although they seem to have strange suggestions at times. I have no idea how it really works but I do not have a stand for my brushes.

I would be very cautious to call that test "scientific" but accept the term "fairly".

The study measured the weight loss not the humidity inside the brush. I would dare assume there is a difference between the two ways of drying your brush when it comes to where the water goes during the drying process. In other words, while the brush is drying, where is the water concentrated? Throughout the brush(when hung) or concentrated towards the handle (when upright).


Well, there is no other way of saying this:
I noticed that overnight the brush gets dry, at least on the outside but if you stick your fingers inside you will noticed dampness.

I hang mine.

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 04-30-2012, 07:23 PM
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(04-30-2012, 04:16 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Are you really a nerd, or do just you have a pen holder in your shirt pocket? Just kidding, just kidding. Tongue

I wore a pocket protector for years. Yeah, I'm hopeless. Biggrin

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 05-01-2012, 06:16 AM
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(04-30-2012, 07:16 PM)VerbaVolant Wrote:
(04-30-2012, 12:49 PM)TallyShave Wrote: Someone did a fairly scientific test on this before by essentially weighing their brush before and after an overnight drying period over a fairly lengthy period of time both hung and standing. His results were that the brush dried faster (by weight) when left standing up. How conclusive that is is debatable, but it was a fairly well done test.

I have also seen where some brush manufacturers suggest this although they seem to have strange suggestions at times. I have no idea how it really works but I do not have a stand for my brushes.

I would be very cautious to call that test "scientific" but accept the term "fairly".

The study measured the weight loss not the humidity inside the brush. I would dare assume there is a difference between the two ways of drying your brush when it comes to where the water goes during the drying process. In other words, while the brush is drying, where is the water concentrated? Throughout the brush(when hung) or concentrated towards the handle (when upright).


Well, there is no other way of saying this:
I noticed that overnight the brush gets dry, at least on the outside but if you stick your fingers inside you will noticed dampness.

I hang mine.

Very true...perhaps I should have used the term "barely scientific". I was really referring more to the controls he had in place, eliminating or minimizing certain variables, number of tests, etc. I really don't think it makes a huge difference either way. My father stood the same brush up for 25+ years without issue and I am sure it would have also been fine if he hung it up.

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 05-01-2012, 07:12 AM
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(04-30-2012, 02:06 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Well, I for one don't have a scientific answer, but mine dry brush up. My thought is that water dissipates upward, not down. So a good shake and swipe across a towel with sitting on the window ledge, works better than hanging.

Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright? Just a thought.

And why we never designed any with rings on the base for hanging upside down? Or lampblacked our brushes upside down...

Gary

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 05-01-2012, 08:01 AM
#18
  • Johnny
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(05-01-2012, 07:12 AM)Gary Young Wrote:
(04-30-2012, 02:06 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Well, I for one don't have a scientific answer, but mine dry brush up. My thought is that water dissipates upward, not down. So a good shake and swipe across a towel with sitting on the window ledge, works better than hanging.

Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright? Just a thought.

And why we never designed any with rings on the base for hanging upside down? Or lampblacked our brushes upside down...

Gary

Darn British are always messing with us.Biggrin

Here is something else to consider. I don't care where you live, you have dust particles in the air. Dust particles settle from the top down, not from the bottom up. I'd rather have dust particles on my handle end than on the tips of my bristles.

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 05-01-2012, 08:05 AM
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(05-01-2012, 08:01 AM)Johnny Wrote:
(05-01-2012, 07:12 AM)Gary Young Wrote:
(04-30-2012, 02:06 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: Well, I for one don't have a scientific answer, but mine dry brush up. My thought is that water dissipates upward, not down. So a good shake and swipe across a towel with sitting on the window ledge, works better than hanging.

Also has anyone given any thought as to why all those handles (especially of old) are made to stand upright? Just a thought.

And why we never designed any with rings on the base for hanging upside down? Or lampblacked our brushes upside down...

Gary

Darn British are always messing with us.Biggrin

Here is something else to consider. I don't care where you live, you have dust particles in the air. Dust particles settle from the top down, not from the bottom up. I'd rather have dust particles on my handle end than on the tips of my bristles.

Ah but in Somerset our dust particles smell of the countryside so I would rather have that aroma filtering through my badger hair as I pick it off the shelf..... Wink

Gary

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 05-01-2012, 08:12 AM
#20
  • Johnny
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(05-01-2012, 08:05 AM)Gary Young Wrote:
(05-01-2012, 08:01 AM)Johnny Wrote:
(05-01-2012, 07:12 AM)Gary Young Wrote: And why we never designed any with rings on the base for hanging upside down? Or lampblacked our brushes upside down...

Gary

Darn British are always messing with us.Biggrin

Here is something else to consider. I don't care where you live, you have dust particles in the air. Dust particles settle from the top down, not from the bottom up. I'd rather have dust particles on my handle end than on the tips of my bristles.

Ah but in Somerset our dust particles smell of the countryside so I would rather have that aroma filtering through my badger hair as I pick it off the shelf..... Wink

Gary

I give up. I surrender. You win.Biggrin But I'm still hanging my brushes bristle down.Smile

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