02-13-2014, 05:50 PM
#1
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As a general rule how long should you use a DE Razor before you decide to purchase and use a Straight ?

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 02-13-2014, 05:56 PM
#2
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I started with a straight and then transitioned to DE. They are two different animals and masteringone does not guarantee anything with the other.

I would say mastering your prep is most important for either.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

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 02-13-2014, 06:26 PM
#3
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......

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 02-13-2014, 07:00 PM
#4
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I will use a straight when the local blood bank has plenty of my blood type on hand.Tongue

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 02-13-2014, 07:01 PM
#5
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What is a good introductory Straight ?

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 02-13-2014, 07:16 PM
#6
  • Triad
  • Triad Razor Handles
  • Texas
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(02-13-2014, 07:01 PM)BigMark Wrote: What is a good introductory Straight ?

Check out whipped dog

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 02-13-2014, 08:16 PM
#7
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I'm still a beginner but I've been using a vintage 7/8 Greaves and Sons FBU. I like it more than my Wade & Butcher Diamond Edge wedge.

I second whipped dog, though

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 02-13-2014, 08:53 PM
#8
  • Bardamu
  • Junior Member
  • Vancouver, BC
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I only shaved with a DE for about six months. I noticed a marginal difference between blades, but razors themselves didn't interest me very much -- no matter what you do, the blade is still fixed at a certain angle. Needless to say, the range that a straight offered me was tempting right from the beginning.

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 02-14-2014, 06:40 AM
#9
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That's like asking how long before I put golf clubs in my son's hands? ASAP! Wink

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 02-14-2014, 08:48 AM
#10
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It really depends on you. Some gents take to straights, right away while others don't. I would suggest getting your technique down to where you are very comfortable using a DE, then start with the straights as then you can always finish off with the DE for a great shave. Biggrin
Best of luck.

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 02-14-2014, 10:33 AM
#11
  • Macko
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
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It's not rocket science, it's angles and pressure, angles and pressure. It will take you 75-100 straight shaves to become fairly comfortable at it no matter when you choose to start.

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 02-14-2014, 11:00 AM
#12
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Once I could shave with comfort with the 2011 R41 I came to the realization that I could likely shave well with a straight. I found (ymmv) that I could get away with a plethora of angle and pressure sins with Webers, Aristocrats, News, Olds, Techs and Ikons that the R41 would not abide. With the straight, the angle becomes very obvious as does the pressure.

Angles, pressure, 100 shaves.

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 02-14-2014, 11:54 AM
#13
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(02-13-2014, 05:56 PM)fbones24 Wrote: I started with a straight and then transitioned to DE. They are two different animals and mastering one does not guarantee anything with the other.

I would say mastering your prep is most important for either.

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

+1 to this.

Sent from my Z10 using Tapatalk

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 02-14-2014, 03:07 PM
#14
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Started with a straight at the very start. Now, many years later, I'm learning the DE. Definitely a better razor for travel.

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 02-17-2014, 03:43 AM
#15
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
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Gentlemen,

I wanted to shave with the straight razor in my twenties, but life got in the way and I finally did decades later. In the early years, I used a variety of Gillette double edge razors — and wish I had kept all. Then the double edge faded and the cartridge and multi-blade plague set in. Some years ago I borrowed a straight razor from a friend —— and have not looked back since.

The double edge razor is not a prerequisite for a traditional straight razor even though they share some similarities. Nor is the straight razor with replaceable blades. All are fine shaving instruments and I use them. The Feather AC DX pearl also goes on trips with me with the Merkur Progress for backup.

If you really want to shave with the traditional straight razor, find a good one that is shave ready, a quality strop, and start shaving. Of course, the straight razor has a long learning curve, but it is worth every moment. Reading and viewing quality videos help.

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 02-17-2014, 02:04 PM
#16
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I started with a straight when I was 15, that was 22 years ago...Scared
I was to young to be concerned.

If it's something you want to learn just jump in Cheers

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 02-17-2014, 03:05 PM
#17
  • Alpha
  • Fatboy Slim
  • Central Wisconsin
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There's no rule as to how long you need before moving to a straight.

Best thing to do is just jump in and try it.

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 02-21-2014, 08:38 PM
#18
  • spada4
  • Member
  • Greensburg, Pa
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I tried to transition to a straight a few years ago and picked up a Double Arrow and a Wapi along with a strop from a vendor I referred to over on Straight Razor Place. After many attempts I could never get the hang of it and my face looked, lets just say, interesting. They are now relegated to my hall closet. As Celestino stated some gents take to straights others do not. I guess it's like the Veg some are chosen.

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 02-21-2014, 09:47 PM
#19
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Wouldn't a SE razor be a more 'natural' stepping stone to a straight razor?

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 02-22-2014, 08:20 AM
#20
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(02-21-2014, 09:47 PM)Darkbulb Wrote: Wouldn't a SE razor be a more 'natural' stepping stone to a straight razor?

Possibly, but straights are so different from safeties of any sort that it's unnecessary to do an 'apprenticeship' at all. If you want to try a straight, just start shaving with a straight.

The only real skills that transfer to straights (for new wetshavers) have little to do with the razors themselves - the prep and lathering technique is the one thing that is shared between these techniques.

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