02-22-2014, 10:00 PM
#1
  • urrlord
  • Active Member
  • central georgia usa
User Info
Just curious.I always remember my coffee directions being 1 teaspoon per cup of water,and have always this proportion.In the last couple of years I've noticed labels calling for 1 tablespoon per cup.when did this change?

0 275
Reply
 02-23-2014, 12:52 AM
#2
User Info
what kind of coffee are you referring to?

7 1,624
Reply
 02-23-2014, 04:44 AM
#3
User Info
I'm curious as well - the only coffee I've seen that was teaspoon to a cup is instant coffee...

The suggestion from Norsk Kaffeinformasjon (Norwegian Coffee Information) is to use 60-70 grams of coffee per liter of water for ordinary drip coffee.

3 4,510
Reply
 02-23-2014, 08:21 AM
#4
User Info
Exactly. I use at least one tablespoon. If I use my French press that holds 2 1/2 cups, I put in 4 tablespoons.

21 1,668
Reply
 02-23-2014, 10:04 AM
#5
  • urrlord
  • Active Member
  • central georgia usa
User Info
I seem to recall the 1 teaspoon from maybe Beech-Nut or some other minor brand of coffee when I was growing up.Then again my family did not drink coffee.I think it was one of my farm wife aunts.Or maybe that was just her measurement to stretch things out.I seem to recall that she used to keep a percolator going all day.Any way that is what I use ,in fact I don't like really strong coffee .

Right now I am using Chase and Sanborn ,a medium-light roast.I use 3 mounded teaspoons in a 4 cup maker and get a pot of really tasty coffee.If I want a stronger I'll go 4 or 5 teaspoons.

0 275
Reply
 02-23-2014, 11:50 AM
#6
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
Coffee-to-water ratio. Most people find that when 20% of soluble solids are extracted from the coffee grounds, the brew has the best flavors. Too much extraction (too fine grind, too long brew time, too hot water, too much ground coffee) and the brew tastes bitter. On the other hand, under-extraction results in a thin, weak, sour cup. Simply using more coffee grounds doesn’t correct under-extraction. It is a good idea to weigh your coffee or use an SCAA coffee scoop or a measuring device that you know will hold 10 grams of coffee. It is also a good idea, at least initially, to weigh or measure your water as well.

Amt of Coffee
Amt of water by weight Infusion Time

Drip Brewing #1 drip filtercone 5 oz (150ml) 8 grams 2:30
#2 drip filtercone 10 oz (300ml) 16 gr 2:30
Clever Coffee Dripper 12 oz (360mL) 22 gr 4:00
#4 filter 20 oz (590 ml) 32 gr 2:30
Chemex 6 cup 30 oz (890 ml) 50 gr 2:30
Chemex 8 cup 40 oz (1180 ml) 65 gr 2:30
Chemex 13 cup 50 oz (1480 ml) 81 gr 2:30

*Tip: For drip cone methods, wet the grounds and let them "bloom" for 30 seconds, then pour slowly for 2 minutes


French Press :
4T 16 oz (470 ml) 28 gr 4 to 6 min
8T 32 oz (950 ml) 56 gr 4 to 6 min
12T 48 oz (1420 ml) 84 gr 4 to 6 min

*Tip: Plunge after infusion time, then wait four minutes and pour slowly

Vacuum pot:
5 c Yama 20 oz (590 ml) 32 gr 45 seconds
Cona C 25 oz (740 ml) 40.3 gr 45 seconds
8c Yama/Cona D 32 oz (950 ml) 51.7 gr 45 seconds

*Tip: Infusion time measured once water is up in the coffee.There is a range of techniques - from adding hot water to the bottom bowl to letting the water rise to the top and then adding the coffee. So you may want to check out a variety of techniques and find the one that works for you.


Technivorm:
8 cup 34 oz (1000 mL) 57 gr 6 min
10 cup 42 oz (1240 mL) 68 gr 6 min




*Tip: We close the drip stop switch on the brew basket (KBT-741 & KBTS models), wait for the brew basket to fill, stir and then let it flow.



Water temperature for all brewing is 195 to 205 degrees. Typically this means water just off the boil.

On weighing ground coffee: It is much more accurate to measure roasted coffee by weight, since dark roasted coffee takes up more room than light roast. A "standard coffee scoop" (which in reality can vary widely) ought to be equal to two level Tbsps, which is be 8 to 9 grams of dark roast, or 10 to 11 grams of light roast coffee.
Taken from Sweet Maria web site

68 1,068
Reply
 02-23-2014, 06:06 PM
#7
User Info
Wow, Barry! You sure do love your coffee, I can see! Great information! Smile

83 21,078
Reply
 02-23-2014, 07:33 PM
#8
User Info
I must agree with Celestino. WOW! I had no idea that much detail was given to making coffee. You must brew a fantastic cup of coffee.

32 1,746
Reply
 02-24-2014, 05:32 AM
#9
  • urrlord
  • Active Member
  • central georgia usa
User Info
Wow!That was like I was back sitting in my 11th grad chemistry class.LOL.
I bet you do make a mean cup of coffee.

I'm guessing from the info you gave out Barry that my method is on the lower end of the accepted extraction ratio.As my coffee is not sour as it would be if under extracted and certainly is not bitter.Although I have met many who think coffee is supposed to be bitter.

I am surprised to learn that my 75% strength brew is closer to half strength.Hmmm.That would probably make my docs happy.

0 275
Reply
 02-24-2014, 06:57 AM
#10
User Info
(02-23-2014, 11:50 AM)Barrylu Wrote: Coffee-to-water ratio. Most people find that when 20% of soluble solids are extracted from the coffee grounds, the brew has the best flavors. Too much extraction (too fine grind, too long brew time, too hot water, too much ground coffee) and the brew tastes bitter. On the other hand, under-extraction results in a thin, weak, sour cup. Simply using more coffee grounds doesn’t correct under-extraction. It is a good idea to weigh your coffee or use an SCAA coffee scoop or a measuring device that you know will hold 10 grams of coffee. It is also a good idea, at least initially, to weigh or measure your water as well.

Amt of Coffee
Amt of water by weight Infusion Time

Drip Brewing #1 drip filtercone 5 oz (150ml) 8 grams 2:30
#2 drip filtercone 10 oz (300ml) 16 gr 2:30
Clever Coffee Dripper 12 oz (360mL) 22 gr 4:00
#4 filter 20 oz (590 ml) 32 gr 2:30
Chemex 6 cup 30 oz (890 ml) 50 gr 2:30
Chemex 8 cup 40 oz (1180 ml) 65 gr 2:30
Chemex 13 cup 50 oz (1480 ml) 81 gr 2:30

*Tip: For drip cone methods, wet the grounds and let them "bloom" for 30 seconds, then pour slowly for 2 minutes


French Press :
4T 16 oz (470 ml) 28 gr 4 to 6 min
8T 32 oz (950 ml) 56 gr 4 to 6 min
12T 48 oz (1420 ml) 84 gr 4 to 6 min

*Tip: Plunge after infusion time, then wait four minutes and pour slowly

Vacuum pot:
5 c Yama 20 oz (590 ml) 32 gr 45 seconds
Cona C 25 oz (740 ml) 40.3 gr 45 seconds
8c Yama/Cona D 32 oz (950 ml) 51.7 gr 45 seconds

*Tip: Infusion time measured once water is up in the coffee.There is a range of techniques - from adding hot water to the bottom bowl to letting the water rise to the top and then adding the coffee. So you may want to check out a variety of techniques and find the one that works for you.


Technivorm:
8 cup 34 oz (1000 mL) 57 gr 6 min
10 cup 42 oz (1240 mL) 68 gr 6 min




*Tip: We close the drip stop switch on the brew basket (KBT-741 & KBTS models), wait for the brew basket to fill, stir and then let it flow.



Water temperature for all brewing is 195 to 205 degrees. Typically this means water just off the boil.

On weighing ground coffee: It is much more accurate to measure roasted coffee by weight, since dark roasted coffee takes up more room than light roast. A "standard coffee scoop" (which in reality can vary widely) ought to be equal to two level Tbsps, which is be 8 to 9 grams of dark roast, or 10 to 11 grams of light roast coffee.
Taken from Sweet Maria web site

so - to say it simple:

about 60 grams coffee to 1 liter water will do the trick Wink

7 1,624
Reply
 02-24-2014, 07:37 AM
#11
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
Good rule of thumb.This was not a trivial question. One can see the ratios do change when different preps are used. If you think that is complex wait till you get into water chemistry for brewing and heat ramps for roasting.

68 1,068
Reply
 02-24-2014, 08:13 AM
#12
User Info
that's why i prefer a barista to do the maths. at home i do it simple Tongue

7 1,624
Reply
 02-24-2014, 08:25 AM
#13
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
User Info
Barry, that information is amazing. Like Marius, no wonder I go to my local coffeehouses (not Charbucks).

2 11,211
Reply
 02-24-2014, 08:30 AM
#14
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
(02-24-2014, 08:13 AM)tonsorius Wrote: that's why i prefer a barista to do the maths. at home i do it simple Tongue
Absolutely. The final determination is ones own taste. I don't have to know how stainless Steel is made or machined to know the best razor for me. I don't need to know the chemistry of soap making to find the best shaving soap.I do, however, have to know the best technique for obtaining the best home shave possible. Or I can be shaved every morning by a professional barber and be done with it.

68 1,068
Reply
 02-24-2014, 09:32 AM
#15
User Info
i clearly see your point Smile we all choose different interests that we are passionate about. you choose coffee - i choose tea - but both of us choose to be our own professional barber Biggrin

7 1,624
Reply
 07-06-2014, 05:19 PM
#16
User Info
It did not occur to me a change like this was made! I will see if this is really happening

0 62
Reply
 07-26-2014, 05:03 PM
#17
  • urrlord
  • Active Member
  • central georgia usa
User Info
Just an update.A while back I picked up some spice flavored Gevalia coffee.The instructions on the bag called for 1 teaspoon to a cup...Maybe because it is a fine grind coffee.So I guess there are some brands that call for the measurements that I remembered.

0 275
Reply
 07-27-2014, 07:44 PM
#18
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
User Info
One thing to consider is that the "Cup" is usually 5 oz but most of us use "Mugs' which are often 11 oz...therefore almost double the size.....I have an 8 cup Bonavita(1300ml or 40 oz) and I use 6 coffee scoops which works out well for my taste...(one coffee measure is 2 tablespoons)

6 2,028
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)