03-05-2014, 12:45 PM
#1
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This could be either coffee or tea related, so this is a nice place to post it. Biggrin

Does anyone else here drink chicory? It is sometimes used as a coffee substitute, and is certainly used to adulterate ground coffee in some places in the world. I find it to be a nice addition to coffee sometimes - cutting the acidity and making it smoother. I also use it as a 'tea' - brewed by itself. I quite like it every now and then.

I know that the coffee snobs here will scream 'sacrilege' at the thought of adulterating their lovely coffee with chicory, but I think of it as a variation to regular coffee - like adding a flavour.

If you're considering trying it, make sure you start using it at a 1:5 ratio or so when mixing it with coffee, as it can quickly overtake the coffee taste --- you can adjust the proportion to your taste. It makes the brew much darker than an equivalent amount of coffee, so keep that in mind when using cream.

When making a tea, use less than a teaspoonful for each cup and brew for a short time in boiling water.

It has some positive health benefits, but nothing really stands out.

[Image: chicory.jpg]

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 03-05-2014, 01:07 PM
#2
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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(03-05-2014, 12:45 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: This could be either coffee or tea related, so this is a nice place to post it. Biggrin

Does anyone else here drink chicory? It is sometimes used as a coffee substitute, and is certainly used to adulterate ground coffee in some places in the world. I find it to be a nice addition to coffee sometimes - cutting the acidity and making it smoother. I also use it as a 'tea' - brewed by itself. I quite like it every now and then.

I know that the coffee snobs here will scream 'sacrilege' at the thought of adulterating their lovely coffee with chicory, but I think of it as a variation to regular coffee - like adding a flavour.

If you're considering trying it, make sure you start using it at a 1:5 ratio or so when mixing it with coffee, as it can quickly overtake the coffee taste --- you can adjust the proportion to your taste. It makes the brew much darker than an equivalent amount of coffee, so keep that in mind when using cream.

When making a tea, use less than a teaspoonful for each cup and brew for a short time in boiling water.

It has some positive health benefits, but nothing really stands out.

[Image: chicory.jpg]


Chicory was a popular coffee substitute and economizer for 2 centuries, back when coffee was more prized, and pure coffee was a luxury.
In modern times it became very popular during WWII. Coffee was rationed and hard to come by. .The usual practice was to use the chicory as an extender additive to make your rationed coffee last longer. After the war when coffee again became abundant chicory dropped out of use by most Americans. The one group who continued using it even until today are people from southern Louisiana.Chicory is not a member of the coffee family. It is not even a bean but rather a root. It does however. compliment some dark (French Roast) coffees.

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 03-05-2014, 01:13 PM
#3
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Yep, the chicory plant is actually a weed in most of the US. It grows everywhere! The roots are roasted and ground and used as a coffee substitute.

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 03-05-2014, 01:44 PM
#4
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How is this stuff? I hear about it every now and then. I might be wrong but I think DogFishHead has a beer brewed with Chicory.

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 03-05-2014, 01:48 PM
#5
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
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Community Coffee (from New Orleans) sells their coffee with chicory. Tasty stuff. It's the same coffee they serve in "Cafe du Monde" on Bourbon street.
On its own, I can't imagine chicory tasting very good.

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 03-05-2014, 02:08 PM
#6
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I drank it years ago because it was a less expense substitute for coffee. If I remember it did come from New Orleans.

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 03-05-2014, 02:35 PM
#7
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(03-05-2014, 01:48 PM)Mr_Smartepants Wrote: Community Coffee (from New Orleans) sells their coffee with chicory. Tasty stuff. It's the same coffee they serve in "Cafe du Monde" on Bourbon street.
On its own, I can't imagine chicory tasting very good.

It's not bad.....as long as you don't expect it to taste like coffee. It took me a while to figure out how to brew it properly.

It certainly is more palatable mixed with coffee.

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 03-05-2014, 02:36 PM
#8
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I've had some from my local roasters as it is part of their New Orleans Blend

Unfortunately, when I drink it regularly well... let's just say I spend some time on the toilet. Blush

"The only problem with inulin may be that it doesn't have the texture or taste of fiber. This can make it easy to consume too much, bringing on the same kind of digestive problems caused by an excess of any fiber: gas/bloating, nausea, flatulence, stomach cramping, diarrhea, constipation and digestive "rumbling." A study from the University of Minnesota published in 2010 found that most healthy people can tolerate up to 10 grams of native inulin (one type of inulin product) and five grams of "sweet" inulin (another version) daily. Flatulence was the most common symptom reported by study participants regardless of the type of inulin they consumed. The study was published in the June 2010 Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Andrew Weil, M.D."

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 03-05-2014, 03:48 PM
#9
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I have tried it and it isn't bad, really. However, I much prefer Yerba Mate! Biggrin

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 03-05-2014, 04:12 PM
#10
  • Stubbl E
  • Senior Member
  • Lake Tahoe, California
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I love it, especially with a nice oily dark roast. It adds another layer of grease! Scald some half & half and Bob's your mother's brother.

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 03-05-2014, 04:55 PM
#11
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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If you grow up in New Orleans the only coffee in the supermarkets locals drink are Community and CDM, both have chicory. Locals don't tend to buy Cafe Du Monde coffee , its mostly for tourists . Chicory in coffee in New Orleans is a French tradition I'd think.

If you grow up in New Orleans drinking chicory coffee you're likely to find standard coffees tasting weak. New Orleanians tend to think of coffee and chicory as a strong cup.

I used to order chicory online and simply mix it with ground coffee to taste like the coffee I grew up drinking.

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 03-06-2014, 12:49 PM
#12
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Hanzo-

Would you be able to tell us what proportion of chicory to coffee you use? I'm just curious.

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 03-08-2014, 12:59 AM
#13
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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I last used the product Coffee Partner and would add a package, to one pound of ground coffee.

http://www.cajungrocer.com/coffee-partne...p-623.html

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 03-08-2014, 09:12 AM
#14
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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This might work out a bit cheaper. However, you might have to grind it yourself.
http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee/other/...=2629#2629

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 07-06-2014, 05:11 PM
#15
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This is certainly interesting, what exactly is in this coffee substitute?

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 07-06-2014, 05:38 PM
#16
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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Chicory is a plant. The part that is used for coffee is the root.It is ground and added to the ground coffee

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 07-06-2014, 05:52 PM
#17
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I spent over a year in Houma, LA and grew quite fond of Community coffee. It took a little getting used to but kind of stuck with me.

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 07-07-2014, 10:23 AM
#18
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Oh okay, have people been cultivating it for a long time and drinking it?

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