03-14-2014, 05:01 PM
#1
User Info
Hello all,

I have been reading this forum from few days and wanted your help to decide my first razor.

From what I have read people recommend Merkur 34C HD, EJ DE89 for newbies like me to learn. My main reason to go DE is eco friendly and off-course cost in long run. So I want to invest in one good razor and be done with it for now Smile. I was looking for Weber SS razor with bulldog handle which I like but then I read about Merkur Futur, Visions, Gillette vintage etc and get confused.

Here is the info:

- I have pretty average beard and not at all on thick side.
- My budget is flexible under $150 for razor, less the better.
- I have sensitive skin and want a close shave.
- I was thinking to get a SS razor as it looks good and I can keep it forever.
- Also I was thinking to buy Astra SP blades (good decision ? I read good reviews)
- What cream and brush to buy or use can foam (flame suit on Tongue)
- Where to buy all this stuff ?

Please recommend, Thanks in advance !

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 03-14-2014, 06:07 PM
#2
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
User Info
Check out Bullgoose starter "kit"...(look under accessories and gifts...has one for $80.00 and one for $107.00)

6 2,028
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 03-14-2014, 06:23 PM
#3
User Info
I started with EJ89l last year and it is a great razor to learn on. However, if I had to do it all over again, I would probably start with a progress to experiment blade gap before settling on a razor. This requires discipline to keep it on one setting while you work onyourskill.

0 54
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 03-14-2014, 06:28 PM
#4
User Info
if you wanna go eco friendly and low cost: vintage us gillette tech with triangular holes. to shave a bit closer: merkur slant. both of these can last 'forever'. no need to go ss for that.

for brush i can suggest a semogue 1250.

can goo is not really an option for a gentleman - so just forget it right away Euro try a soap from mitchells instead Wink

i never tried astra blades but i'm sure they are perfectly alright. try them and find out how you like them.

seems you had no need for your flame suit after all Smile

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 03-14-2014, 06:28 PM
#5
User Info
I'd get a vintage Gillette Fatboy. To me it is the one razor to rule them all.

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 03-14-2014, 06:32 PM
#6
  • Elendil
  • Raggedy man, good night
  • The snow's back.
User Info
I find the fit and finish on the EJ to be better than the Merkurs, and you'll have different handle textures to choose from. Astras are solid blades, and good to get started. Buy a couple packs of blades and stick with them for awhile until you are comfortable with your technique. Good luck!

0 1,137
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 03-14-2014, 07:53 PM
#7
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
User Info
Your goal of getting one razor and "being done with it" is an unobtainable one. Until you try several razors, blades, soaps, and brushes, you have no way of knowing what products are right for you. You are also going to get so many different responses to your question, that you'll probably go away even more confused, as each person responding has found different products that worked for them. My own recommendations would be for an adjustable razor, a reasonably priced fat boy or a Mercur Progress, as they would allow you to adjust the blade gap for your particular skin and beard type. I'd purchase a sample pack of different blades, so that you'd be able to find the one that works best for your particular razor and beard. Your can also purchase samples of soaps and creams. Consider shaving cream samples from Trufitt & Hill or Al's Shaving Products, or soap samples from Stirling. I wouldn't invest a lot of money in a brush. Boar brushes are relatively inexpensive, and the Semogue 1250 mentioned above is as good as any. I prefer badger brushes, but a good one can run considerably more money.

As much as you'd like guidance, in the long run you're just going to have to try different products yourself until you find what works for you. However, you have a wonderful adventure ahead of you, as there are so many terrific products available today. The important thing is to have fun!

38 5,111
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 03-14-2014, 08:10 PM
#8
User Info
I can't recall anyone ever flaming someone in search of knowledge on this site. So relax, we're here to help.

I would suggest vintage to keep costs down and a vintage adjustable. A Fatboy can be pricey, but a Slim shaves and feels better IMO, and it can be adjusted from extremely mild to quite aggressive so it can grow with your ability, need, and desire. Or it can be left on one setting and you can forget that it can even be adjusted. Gillette Slims don't command a premium price either. Yes, it'll be used. No, that isn't a germ problem if you deal with the razor properly after you receive it. FWIW, I use non SS razors that were made well over 100 years ago and they're still going strong today. The Slim I mentioned? They can be over 50 years old and some look like they were made yesterday.

You definitely need a brush, an Omega boar is quite inexpensive but don't equate expense with "better" or inexpensive with junk. An Omega boar is very good while being much less expensive than others. Boars make excellent lather and many of us actually prefer boar. If you don't want pig bristle, the synthetics are very good today and they'll be far less expensive than a comparable badger brush.

Soap can be bought locally. VdH is an inexpensive but good performing soap if one knows how to make it work. It's not difficult. It can be found at Wal-Mart. Another 2 are Kiss My Face and Bigelow. I find Kiss My Face at my local natural market and it is very good. So is Bigelow. I find that at Bath and Body. Of course in this age of the internet you can get soaps from around the world also. They can range from extremely inexpensive to very expensive. Most of the inexpensive soaps work every bit as good during the shave as the very expensive ones. The difference is in the skin feel after the shave and scent.

Blades. DO NOT buy one blade and think you're done. You have absolutely no idea what will work for you and neither do we. Instead, buy a sampler. DO NOT scrimp on this sampler. The other items are required and important, but the blade will be what makes or breaks your shave. It is the item that is closest to your skin during the shave. Blade testing to find what blade(s) you like will be critical. Lots of times if you just express a desire to try something folks will send you freebies. Blades especially since they can be sent in an envelope.

OK, after you get your gear, practice lathering. You don't need to lather and shave. It's perfectly OK to lather and then dump the lather. But when it's time get back to us and we'll guide you through it. Or just check the archives, I know there is information there. Other than the blade I feel that lather is the next most (maybe most) critical aspect of a great and comfortable shave. You MUST master making great lather. Leave the canned goop for those who simply don't know any better. We know better and now so do you. Once you know great lather the canned goop won't attract you. There is simply no contest between what we make and what comes out of a can.

You have plenty of decisions to make, but you can easily keep your initial expenditure below your maximum. Or you can buy the most expensive items and far exceed your budget.

When you have questions we're here to help. It may seem daunting, but we all learned, I see no reason why you can't.

32 6,459
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 03-14-2014, 08:15 PM
#9
User Info
Great suggestions already given and I would also suggest the Merkur Progress as it is a smooth shaver and it is an adjustable which is very useful once your technique improves.
Best of luck! Biggrin

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 03-14-2014, 08:18 PM
#10
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
User Info
If you truly have sensitive skin, you don't want too close a shave. An aggressive razor shaves close, but it can also damage sensitive skin. A mild razor is designed for sensitive skin and it can provide a close shave when handled skillfully.

I have sensitive skin, myself, so I use gentle/mild razors. The Edwin Jagger is milder than the Merkur 34C and the Weber SS. Many consider the Edwin Jagger to be a mild razor, but I find it a little on the aggressive side for regular use. The Merkur and Weber are more aggressive, still. The Merkur Futur and Vision are also more aggressive, even at low settings.

I agree with most of the other recommendations here. A vintage Gillette, such as a Super Speed or a Tech would be very good. You might also consider adjustable razors, such as the Gillette Fatboy, Gillette Slim, Gillette Super Adjustable, or a Merkur Progress. All of these go from gentle to aggressive (moderately aggressive for the Gillettes and quite aggressive for the Progress). In the case of an adjustable, the lowest setting that gets you a good shave is the best setting. Adjustables are often not recommended to new wetshavers because of the temptation to keep changing the setting, which interferes with learning how to handle a razor.

My favorite razor of all of these is the Merkur Progress. I have one with a customized knob at the bottom of the handle, and these customized versions are often referred to by the name "Mergress." I use mine on the lowest setting, where it is decidedly mild but still remarkably effective. In fact, in eight years of buying and experimenting with different razors, this is the best combination of mild and effective that I have found.

If you have sensitive skin, one of these adjustables might be a good way to go. This way, you can be sure that you have a mild enough razor for sensitive skin and to facilitate learning. If you find that your skin isn't that sensitive or if you want a more aggressive razor as you gain skill, you can then adjust these higher.

The Astra blades will probably be fine.

Most of the vendors, including the sponsor of this website ( http://www.bullgooseshaving.com ), carry the Merkur Progress. If you want to consider a Mergress, at a higher price, you can get them at http://www.leesrazors.com

Wishing you the best on this journey -

- Murray

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 03-14-2014, 09:01 PM
#11
User Info
Although Astra SP blades are generally well regarded, it would be prudent to purchase a sampler pack from any one of the fine TSN-affiliated vendors. Blade choice is VERY personal, and what is good for some, will be mediocre or terrible for others.

For instance, I have used innumerable blades on my razor wire beard, believe that the Astra SPs are acceptable but certainly not exceptional, and prefer the Personna Labs/Supers/Meds as my daily blade for the right combination of sharpness, smoothness and longevity.

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 03-14-2014, 09:06 PM
#12
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
User Info
I would suggest the EJ DE89 or some variation of it. They are all the same heads just different handles. I recommend it because of your beard type. This razor will be perfect for you. I would also suggest picking up a Semogue Boar Brush. They are great brushes and a great value. The 1800 is a great all around brush. Check out bullgooseshaving.com

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 03-14-2014, 10:07 PM
#13
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
All of the above are good recommendations. Just remember one thing, you are not using canned foam and a multi-blade razor, so do not use any pressure. Let the weight of the razor do the work. You are not trying for that baby smooth shave in one pass. Think of it as whisker reduction. To start out just do two passes. First pass, north to south or top to bottom. Rinse face in warm water and re-lather. Second pass west to east or east to west depending on what side of the face you are working on. In other words, from the ear to the nose.

After you get the hang of it you may want to venture in to doing three passes. I personally just do two passes with a little touch up.

Ask questions and watch as many videos as you can. If you use youtube, look for GeoFatBoy or mantic59. Both have excellent video instruction.

Good luck.

178 23,809
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 03-15-2014, 03:08 AM
#14
  • celar36
  • Enjoying Life 1 shave at time
  • London, UK
User Info
Below is advice given to me on other forum by fantastic guy Wendell "JWW"
It was when I start shaving and ask similar question as you. I felt I will share that with you since razor question was nicely answered already.

Quote:Regarding technique -- figuring out blade angle can be a tad difficult at first. Here is what I did based on the many suggestions from others in the know many years ago.

Assuming a downward stroke (we usually refer to is as north to south -- i.e from the top of your face towards the bottom).
1. Start with the top of the razor head flat against your face, holding the razor with your elbow away from you. The razor handle is parallel to the floor, as is your forearm.
2. Thinking of the razor as an extension to your forearm, slowly, ever so slowly, let the razor handle end drop in the direction of the downward stroke while lowering your arm at the shoulder ever so slightly and while keeping your arm and razor in a single strait line.
3. As soon as you hear the little pings of the whiskers being cut, stop dropping your arm and keep that angle as you finish the stroke. If you go too far, you will feel a pull or scraping sensation on your skin.
4. Use your wrist to make micro adjustments to angle to keep the pings consistent.

Now -- use the same technique whenever you change stroke direction by tilting the razor handle in the direction of the stroke and adjusting your arm angle accordingly.

That's how I conquered blade angle.

For pressure it was much simpler for me. If I felt the blade on my face, then there was way too much pressure. Let the weight of the razor do the work of the cutting rather than placing pressure on your face. The thing I try to focus on is sensing the razor head and not the blade. This isn't particularly fool-proof, but it helped me tremendously when I moved from a cartridge to a DE razor.

I suppose what I am saying is that I find that it's all about controlling the razor rather than shaving with it like you see on those commercials advertising cartridge shaving with lightening speed. As so imminently put so many times on this forum -- it's your face not a race (thanks to Oscar for that one -- think it's my favourite tag line on SMF).

Insofar as products are concerned, I would agree with Squire that as a beginner you would probably be well served if you kept the mix very simple at first. Stick with a single soap or cream, one brush, and basic aftershave balm. I personally am a skin food user - that, some witch hazel and The Body Shop Razor Relief have been my post-shave staples over years. Simple, basic and they work. Period. I guess compared to Squire, though, I am a heavy user of post-shave product. ymmv

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 03-15-2014, 04:09 AM
#15
User Info
Fairly new myself been doing this now for two months - Great advice is this thread, which I knew some of this when I started. I seen it mentioned here but definitely start with a blade sampler - Blades that work for others might not work for you...That happened to me and I have now narrowed my blade choice to 3 or 4 I really like

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 03-15-2014, 09:04 AM
#16
User Info
I have a Gillette Slim adjustable razor, and am very happy with it. An adjustable will give you more flexibility with different passes, blades, etc.

I have a ton of the Astra SP blades; I don't think you can go wrong there, and they certainly are a great value.

As to cream, my favorite is Truefitt and Hill No. 10, which can be gotten from Royal Shave and a couple of other places, including T+H directly.

For a brush, the Muhle/hjm synthetic is surprisingly soft and it's quick drying. They're inexpensive and very modern looking. It can double as a travel brush, but it's not so small as to be ineffective.

This is certainly an area where quality matters, and quality will out. After all, I'm using a razor that's older than I am, and it shows no sign of stopping.

3 10
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 03-16-2014, 05:28 AM
#17
  • TADIII
  • Gilletter from Home
  • FL & NC
User Info
Although I have been wet-shaving (mostly with a Gillette Slim) since 1960, it is only in the past year, from forums like this, that I learned my prep and technique were truly terrible.

Please ignore my Aquisition Disorders while I recount the following:
Nasty Gillette Old on eBay for under $10
Sam Duran replated the head for $18
Ikon Shavecraft Bulldog handle on Amazon for $32 (now $34)
Couple of hundred Personna Lab blades, Amazon, under $25
Three large tubes C. O. Bigelow shaving cream at Bath and Body Shop for $20 (I love this stuff!)
Nasty old butterscotch bakelite brush local flea mkt $12
Silvertip badger knot from Virginia Sheng $15
Brush restored by me
(By my reckoning - about the equivalent of 35 Proglide carts.)
I think this is a kit that reflects me and that's pretty much a forever setup, although I do intend to run out of those blades and cream.
Good luck on your hunt!
[Image: 5KRD21u.jpg]

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 03-16-2014, 08:47 AM
#18
User Info
Woow this is some overwhelming reply Smile really appreciate it. I will try to answer the questions or post one by one.

(03-14-2014, 06:07 PM)Harvey Wrote: Check out Bullgoose starter "kit"...(look under accessories and gifts...has one for $80.00 and one for $107.00)

Did check out that stuff, Thanks

(03-14-2014, 06:28 PM)Face Bannon Wrote: I'd get a vintage Gillette Fatboy. To me it is the one razor to rule them all.

(03-14-2014, 07:53 PM)evnpar Wrote: Your goal of getting one razor and "being done with it" is an unobtainable one. Until you try several razors, blades, soaps, and brushes, you have no way of knowing what products are right for you. You are also going to get so many different responses to your question, that you'll probably go away even more confused, as each person responding has found different products that worked for them. My own recommendations would be for an adjustable razor, a reasonably priced fat boy or a Mercur Progress, as they would allow you to adjust the blade gap for your particular skin and beard type. I'd purchase a sample pack of different blades, so that you'd be able to find the one that works best for your particular razor and beard. Your can also purchase samples of soaps and creams. Consider shaving cream samples from Trufitt & Hill or Al's Shaving Products, or soap samples from Stirling. I wouldn't invest a lot of money in a brush. Boar brushes are relatively inexpensive, and the Semogue 1250 mentioned above is as good as any. I prefer badger brushes, but a good one can run considerably more money.

As much as you'd like guidance, in the long run you're just going to have to try different products yourself until you find what works for you. However, you have a wonderful adventure ahead of you, as there are so many terrific products available today. The important thing is to have fun!

Where to buy Gillette vintage from, Ebay ? Not sure how to check condition. I will get it revamped from razor emporium if I go with vintage. What do you guys think of merkur progress mentioned in this thread against gillette slim ?

(03-14-2014, 06:23 PM)Malarkey Wrote: I started with EJ89l last year and it is a great razor to learn on. However, if I had to do it all over again, I would probably start with a progress to experiment blade gap before settling on a razor. This requires discipline to keep it on one setting while you work on your skill.
Yeah those are on my list now Smile. Thanks

(03-14-2014, 06:28 PM)tonsorius Wrote: if you wanna go eco friendly and low cost: vintage us gillette tech with triangular holes. to shave a bit closer: merkur slant. both of these can last 'forever'. no need to go ss for that.

for brush i can suggest a semogue 1250.

can goo is not really an option for a gentleman - so just forget it right away Euro try a soap from mitchells instead Wink

i never tried astra blades but i'm sure they are perfectly alright. try them and find out how you like them.

seems you had no need for your flame suit after all Smile


Right now I am looking at
Gillette Slim
Merkur Progress
EJ89
Gillette fatboy (Worth spending more over slim ?)

I was going SS just for looks Tongue looks like I don't need it. Michells looks very popular and good Smile
Yeah flame suit was not needed Heart


(03-14-2014, 06:32 PM)Elendil Wrote: I find the fit and finish on the EJ to be better than the Merkurs, and you'll have different handle textures to choose from. Astras are solid blades, and good to get started. Buy a couple packs of blades and stick with them for awhile until you are comfortable with your technique. Good luck!

Thanks for your reply Smile

(03-14-2014, 07:53 PM)evnpar Wrote: Your goal of getting one razor and "being done with it" is an unobtainable one. Until you try several razors, blades, soaps, and brushes, you have no way of knowing what products are right for you. You are also going to get so many different responses to your question, that you'll probably go away even more confused, as each person responding has found different products that worked for them. My own recommendations would be for an adjustable razor, a reasonably priced fat boy or a Mercur Progress, as they would allow you to adjust the blade gap for your particular skin and beard type. I'd purchase a sample pack of different blades, so that you'd be able to find the one that works best for your particular razor and beard. Your can also purchase samples of soaps and creams. Consider shaving cream samples from Trufitt & Hill or Al's Shaving Products, or soap samples from Stirling. I wouldn't invest a lot of money in a brush. Boar brushes are relatively inexpensive, and the Semogue 1250 mentioned above is as good as any. I prefer badger brushes, but a good one can run considerably more money.

As much as you'd like guidance, in the long run you're just going to have to try different products yourself until you find what works for you. However, you have a wonderful adventure ahead of you, as there are so many terrific products available today. The important thing is to have fun!

Yeah I am incline towards adjustable, where to buy vintage ? or should I go with progress ?

(03-14-2014, 08:10 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I can't recall anyone ever flaming someone in search of knowledge on this site. So relax, we're here to help.

I would suggest vintage to keep costs down and a vintage adjustable. A Fatboy can be pricey, but a Slim shaves and feels better IMO, and it can be adjusted from extremely mild to quite aggressive so it can grow with your ability, need, and desire. Or it can be left on one setting and you can forget that it can even be adjusted. Gillette Slims don't command a premium price either. Yes, it'll be used. No, that isn't a germ problem if you deal with the razor properly after you receive it. FWIW, I use non SS razors that were made well over 100 years ago and they're still going strong today. The Slim I mentioned? They can be over 50 years old and some look like they were made yesterday.

You definitely need a brush, an Omega boar is quite inexpensive but don't equate expense with "better" or inexpensive with junk. An Omega boar is very good while being much less expensive than others. Boars make excellent lather and many of us actually prefer boar. If you don't want pig bristle, the synthetics are very good today and they'll be far less expensive than a comparable badger brush.

Soap can be bought locally. VdH is an inexpensive but good performing soap if one knows how to make it work. It's not difficult. It can be found at Wal-Mart. Another 2 are Kiss My Face and Bigelow. I find Kiss My Face at my local natural market and it is very good. So is Bigelow. I find that at Bath and Body. Of course in this age of the internet you can get soaps from around the world also. They can range from extremely inexpensive to very expensive. Most of the inexpensive soaps work every bit as good during the shave as the very expensive ones. The difference is in the skin feel after the shave and scent.

Blades. DO NOT buy one blade and think you're done. You have absolutely no idea what will work for you and neither do we. Instead, buy a sampler. DO NOT scrimp on this sampler. The other items are required and important, but the blade will be what makes or breaks your shave. It is the item that is closest to your skin during the shave. Blade testing to find what blade(s) you like will be critical. Lots of times if you just express a desire to try something folks will send you freebies. Blades especially since they can be sent in an envelope.

OK, after you get your gear, practice lathering. You don't need to lather and shave. It's perfectly OK to lather and then dump the lather. But when it's time get back to us and we'll guide you through it. Or just check the archives, I know there is information there. Other than the blade I feel that lather is the next most (maybe most) critical aspect of a great and comfortable shave. You MUST master making great lather. Leave the canned goop for those who simply don't know any better. We know better and now so do you. Once you know great lather the canned goop won't attract you. There is simply no contest between what we make and what comes out of a can.

You have plenty of decisions to make, but you can easily keep your initial expenditure below your maximum. Or you can buy the most expensive items and far exceed your budget.

When you have questions we're here to help. It may seem daunting, but we all learned, I see no reason why you can't.

Thank you so much, some great info Smile I may go with badger brush. Where to buy vintage, Ebay ? and slim or fatboy.

(03-14-2014, 08:15 PM)celestino Wrote: Great suggestions already given and I would also suggest the Merkur Progress as it is a smooth shaver and it is an adjustable which is very useful once your technique improves.
Best of luck! Biggrin
Thanks for your reply.

(03-14-2014, 08:18 PM)CMur12 Wrote: If you truly have sensitive skin, you don't want too close a shave. An aggressive razor shaves close, but it can also damage sensitive skin. A mild razor is designed for sensitive skin and it can provide a close shave when handled skillfully.

I have sensitive skin, myself, so I use gentle/mild razors. The Edwin Jagger is milder than the Merkur 34C and the Weber SS. Many consider the Edwin Jagger to be a mild razor, but I find it a little on the aggressive side for regular use. The Merkur and Weber are more aggressive, still. The Merkur Futur and Vision are also more aggressive, even at low settings.

I agree with most of the other recommendations here. A vintage Gillette, such as a Super Speed or a Tech would be very good. You might also consider adjustable razors, such as the Gillette Fatboy, Gillette Slim, Gillette Super Adjustable, or a Merkur Progress. All of these go from gentle to aggressive (moderately aggressive for the Gillettes and quite aggressive for the Progress). In the case of an adjustable, the lowest setting that gets you a good shave is the best setting. Adjustables are often not recommended to new wetshavers because of the temptation to keep changing the setting, which interferes with learning how to handle a razor.

My favorite razor of all of these is the Merkur Progress. I have one with a customized knob at the bottom of the handle, and these customized versions are often referred to by the name "Mergress." I use mine on the lowest setting, where it is decidedly mild but still remarkably effective. In fact, in eight years of buying and experimenting with different razors, this is the best combination of mild and effective that I have found.

If you have sensitive skin, one of these adjustables might be a good way to go. This way, you can be sure that you have a mild enough razor for sensitive skin and to facilitate learning. If you find that your skin isn't that sensitive or if you want a more aggressive razor as you gain skill, you can then adjust these higher.

The Astra blades will probably be fine.

Most of the vendors, including the sponsor of this website ( http://www.bullgooseshaving.com ), carry the Merkur Progress. If you want to consider a Mergress, at a higher price, you can get them at http://www.leesrazors.com

Wishing you the best on this journey -

- Murray

Yeah progress looks really good, what do you say progress or slim or fatboy ? Thanks for your reply

(03-14-2014, 09:01 PM)branford Wrote: Although Astra SP blades are generally well regarded, it would be prudent to purchase a sampler pack from any one of the fine TSN-affiliated vendors. Blade choice is VERY personal, and what is good for some, will be mediocre or terrible for others.

For instance, I have used innumerable blades on my razor wire beard, believe that the Astra SPs are acceptable but certainly not exceptional, and prefer the Personna Labs/Supers/Meds as my daily blade for the right combination of sharpness, smoothness and longevity.

Cool, will look into those Smile

(03-14-2014, 09:06 PM)tgutc Wrote: I would suggest the EJ DE89 or some variation of it. They are all the same heads just different handles. I recommend it because of your beard type. This razor will be perfect for you. I would also suggest picking up a Semogue Boar Brush. They are great brushes and a great value. The 1800 is a great all around brush. Check out bullgooseshaving.com

Yeah EJ DE89 is in my list. Sure will do thanks.

(03-14-2014, 10:07 PM)Johnny Wrote: All of the above are good recommendations. Just remember one thing, you are not using canned foam and a multi-blade razor, so do not use any pressure. Let the weight of the razor do the work. You are not trying for that baby smooth shave in one pass. Think of it as whisker reduction. To start out just do two passes. First pass, north to south or top to bottom. Rinse face in warm water and re-lather. Second pass west to east or east to west depending on what side of the face you are working on. In other words, from the ear to the nose.

After you get the hang of it you may want to venture in to doing three passes. I personally just do two passes with a little touch up.

Ask questions and watch as many videos as you can. If you use youtube, look for GeoFatBoy or mantic59. Both have excellent video instruction.

Good luck.

Got it thanks for your help.

(03-15-2014, 03:08 AM)celar36 Wrote: Below is advice given to me on other forum by fantastic guy Wendell "JWW"
It was when I start shaving and ask similar question as you. I felt I will share that with you since razor question was nicely answered already.

Thanks for your reply

(03-15-2014, 04:09 AM)capmeo Wrote: Fairly new myself been doing this now for two months - Great advice is this thread, which I knew some of this when I started. I seen it mentioned here but definitely start with a blade sampler - Blades that work for others might not work for you...That happened to me and I have now narrowed my blade choice to 3 or 4 I really like

Thanks for you reply

(03-15-2014, 09:04 AM)RaleighJazzFan Wrote: I have a Gillette Slim adjustable razor, and am very happy with it. An adjustable will give you more flexibility with different passes, blades, etc.

I have a ton of the Astra SP blades; I don't think you can go wrong there, and they certainly are a great value.

As to cream, my favorite is Truefitt and Hill No. 10, which can be gotten from Royal Shave and a couple of other places, including T+H directly.

For a brush, the Muhle/hjm synthetic is surprisingly soft and it's quick drying. They're inexpensive and very modern looking. It can double as a travel brush, but it's not so small as to be ineffective.

This is certainly an area where quality matters, and quality will out. After all, I'm using a razor that's older than I am, and it shows no sign of stopping.

Where to buy gillette vintage ?

(03-16-2014, 05:28 AM)TADIII Wrote: Although I have been wet-shaving (mostly with a Gillette Slim) since 1960, it is only in the past year, from forums like this, that I learned my prep and technique were truly terrible.

Please ignore my Aquisition Disorders while I recount the following:
Nasty Gillette Old on eBay for under $10
Sam Duran replated the head for $18
Ikon Shavecraft Bulldog handle on Amazon for $32 (now $34)
Couple of hundred Personna Lab blades, Amazon, under $25
Three large tubes C. O. Bigelow shaving cream at Bath and Body Shop for $20 (I love this stuff!)
Nasty old butterscotch bakelite brush local flea mkt $12
Silvertip badger knot from Virginia Sheng $15
Brush restored by me
(By my reckoning - about the equivalent of 35 Proglide carts.)
I think this is a kit that reflects me and that's pretty much a forever setup, although I do intend to run out of those blades and cream.
Good luck on your hunt!

Great list will try to grab vintage gillette from ebay. Thanks for your reply.

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 03-16-2014, 01:29 PM
#19
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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Between the Gillette adjustables and the Merkur Progress/Mergress, I find the Progress/Mergress to be the most effective. I got good shaves with the Gillette Fatboy, but the Progress/Mergress is exceptional. As I said, in my case I found it to be the best combination of of gentle/mild and effective (two seemingly contradictory characteristics) of any razor I have tried (this at the lowest setting). I wish I had tried this razor a long time ago!

- Murray

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 03-16-2014, 02:33 PM
#20
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Wow you have a lot of good advice. Pretty confusing huh. My recommendation, and you probably have this more than once is to do the following.
1. Go with one of your first choices in a mild razor. Merkur 34, EJ89 or eve a RazoRock mission. My suggestion is to go inexpensive, because it is not going to be your last razor.
2. Get a blade sampler pack with as many different blades as you can afford.
3. An inexpensive Brush, Badger or Boar, and some soap or cream. Cream is easier to lather for newbies.
4. stay with the same hardware for at least 30 days.
5. Enjoy, Enjoy and Enjoy, and try not to rub your face so often in public. People start to look at you funny and give you a wide berth, especially if you are moaning!
Smile

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