03-24-2014, 01:27 PM
#1
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I've only been a convert to cooking in cast-iron for the last 4 years or so. Through that time, a lot of people have mentioned to me that they also use cast-iron, but all of them had warned me not to use it for scrambled eggs. They all insisted that it was pretty near impossible to season a pan well enough to prevent sticking of scrambled eggs to the surface.

For a long time, I used teflon-coated pans for eggs (I'm a bit of a breakfast specialist).

Anyway, over the last few months, I've only used cast-iron for everything - including eggs. It seems that my pans are seasoned to the point where pretty much nothing will stick. I'm pretty thrilled about that. Biggrin

So, if being able to use cast-iron pans for scrambled eggs marks them as being properly seasoned, I've got to that point!

HeartHeartHeart

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 03-24-2014, 01:31 PM
#2
  • Agravic
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  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Yohann, we've gotten rid of all non-stick cookware in our kitchen for the last 5 years ... except the one pan for eggs.

I'm curious ... what was your process for seasoning the cast-iron pan ... ?

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 03-24-2014, 01:45 PM
#3
  • Elendil
  • Raggedy man, good night
  • The snow's back.
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After getting numerous stainless and non-stick All Clads over the years, the only frying and sauteeing we do these days is in cast iron.

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 03-24-2014, 02:07 PM
#4
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(03-24-2014, 01:31 PM)Agravic Wrote: Yohann, we've gotten rid of all non-stick cookware in our kitchen for the last 5 years ... except the one pan for eggs.

I'm curious ... what was your process for seasoning the cast-iron pan ... ?

Ravi-

Basically, all it took was time.

I initially seasoned it by coating it in canola oil and baking it in the oven for a while. Then, after each use I just scraped the residual food off under running hot water (yes, I use water!) with a scourer. Then I hang it up to dry. The hot water also removes all of the residual grease (if any). You can use paper to do the same thing, but I find this easier (and it works).

It took a few times of doing this to get the pans to the point where nothing sticks to them anymore. Best non-stick surface ever.

It was the last bit - hanging it up to dry - that made the difference. Prior to that, I used to do the same thing to clean it off, but I'd heat the pan a bit after cleaning it off, so that the water was removed and it didn't rust. That didn't work so well, as the oil got removed too.

EDIT: Of course, I don't use detergent at any point in the cleaning process.

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 03-24-2014, 02:18 PM
#5
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Cast iron is great! But you should consider trying Carbon steel. All the benefits of Cast Iron (same seasoning process, durability, same metal utensils) in a lighter pan that heats up much more quickly!

We switched most of pans to Carbon Steel about 2-3 years ago, seldom use the cast iron now.

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 03-24-2014, 02:22 PM
#6
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I'll have to look out for them. The thing is, I have a fully-equipped kitchen in cast-iron, and it's going to take some convincing to get my wife to agree to re-equip everything in carbon steel.

Unfortunately, she's not a cast-iron convert, so we also have a bunch of SS stuff around.

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 03-24-2014, 02:28 PM
#7
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all my life i have used cast iron or stainless steel - just like my parents and grand parents. never had a need to try anything else. my swedish and norwegian cast iron skillets and dutch oven are about a century old and still as good as new Smile

for decent quality cast iron cook ware have a look at japanese made oigen:
http://www.oigen.jp

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 03-24-2014, 03:06 PM
#8
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(03-24-2014, 02:28 PM)tonsorius Wrote: all my life i have used cast iron or stainless steel - just like my parents and grand parents. never had a need to try anything else. my swedish and norwegian cast iron skillets and dutch oven are about a century old and still as good as new Smile

for decent quality cast iron cook ware have a look at japanese made oigen:
http://www.oigen.jp

No sir, they are better than new.

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 03-24-2014, 03:14 PM
#9
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Great to hear, Yohann!

Unfortunately, for ours, most things stick to the pan. We have had them for while and they were fine at first. They are the Griswold ones.
Do you think I need to re-season them, again. We also scrap the food under hot water and let dry, but the problem persists.
Any suggestions are welcomed. Smile

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 03-24-2014, 03:59 PM
#10
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(03-24-2014, 03:14 PM)celestino Wrote: Great to hear, Yohann!

Unfortunately, for ours, most things stick to the pan. We have had them for while and they were fine at first. They are the Griswold ones.
Do you think I need to re-season them, again. We also scrap the food under hot water and let dry, but the problem persists.
Any suggestions are welcomed. Smile

Celestino -

The seasoning of a cast iron pan is something that needs to be kept up. It's a constant process.

From what you've written, it seems that the seasoning in your pans has been damaged. You'll need to re-season it. For that, just coat the surface evenly with some canola (or other high-temp oil) and place in the oven at 350 degrees for a while.

To keep the seasoning going, use a thin layer of oil every time you use the pan. Never use detergent on the pan. To clean it, rinse the pan under warm water and use a scrubbing brush or scourer (that has no detergent on it) to scrape off the food residue. Then hang the pan to dry. On a properly seasoned pan, almost all the water can be shaken off in the sink before hanging, so you'll have no dripping.

It will take a while to get the seasoning to this point. Initially, you'll have food that gets stuck to the surface. When that occurs, fill the pan with warm water, and let it stand for 30-60 mins - at that point, you should be able to scrape off the residue.

Water is not a problem for cast iron; detergent is! A properly seasoned pan will not rust unless the seasoning is damaged.

Incidentally, I use wooden cooking implements. I have very little metal stuff that comes in contact with my pans. This is more a case of me liking wood than anything else.

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 03-24-2014, 04:04 PM
#11
  • Agravic
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  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Thanks for the valuable information and tips, Yohann.

Now ... I need to convince my wife of the merits of this process ... before I mess with her kitchen!

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 03-24-2014, 04:12 PM
#12
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(03-24-2014, 04:04 PM)Agravic Wrote: Thanks for the valuable information and tips, Yohann.

Now ... I need to convince my wife of the merits of this process ... before I mess with her kitchen!

You're very welcome, Ravi.

Luckily, I'm the cook at my house. My wife will cook, but I do most of the cooking. I have my set of knives, pots, etc. She won't touch them, which is good. She like to cut stuff on glass plates. If she did that to one of my lovely Japanese knives, I'd throw a fit. Biggrin

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 03-24-2014, 04:46 PM
#13
  • W.S.O.
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  • Philadelphia, Pa
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I use salt to clean my cast iron skillets and season with peanut oil. I wipe the pan clean, sprinkle salt in it and rub with a towel. Same principle just a diff way to clean and a diff high smoke point oil.
I was fortunate enough to inherit my grandmother's cast iron cookware including a cast iron dutch oven and 4 different size skillets, 2 of which were her mothers. I have 2 others of my own that I am solely responsible for seasoning. Hers were so well seasoned it has just been a matter of upkeep seasoning. She is actually the one that taught me how to season and maintain the cast iron cookware.
I have a small 6"pan (one from grandmother) that I received so well seasoned I make super thin crepes in it and flip them with ease.
My wife cant understand the allure to cast iron but for me its the only way I cook as long as I have an applicable cast iron option.

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 03-24-2014, 04:58 PM
#14
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Re: carbon steel pans. On the knife/cooking forums I used to frequent, these were the most recommended: http://www.thekitchn.com/my-new-love-the...pan-180522

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 03-24-2014, 06:23 PM
#15
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To season or re-season my cast iron skillet, I spray cooking spray on the pan, and place it on a burner with a low setting for 15 minutes. Spray again with cooking spray, wipe with a paper towel, and voila! I cook eggs on them all the time!

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 03-24-2014, 06:25 PM
#16
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...but what is cooking spray?

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 03-24-2014, 06:41 PM
#17
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Pam Cooking Spray
(03-24-2014, 06:25 PM)tonsorius Wrote: ...but what is cooking spray?

Basically, it is a very light oil in a can, which allows you to use a very thin coating when cooking. I use it for the cast iron pans and when cooking to keep the calories down. It doesn't taste as good as butter, but it cuts calories.

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 03-24-2014, 08:21 PM
#18
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Yohann, thank you for the update on the re-seasoning. I figured I had to do it more often, but I have never gotten around to experimenting to see if that was the case.
I have already done it, this evening, and will try it again. Biggrin

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 03-26-2014, 02:04 PM
#19
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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here's a little piece, there are many other ways....>>>>http://blog.lot18.com/2012/06/06-cast-iron/
my Dad would have my brothers and I heat 'em in the fireplace
over a bed of applewood coals, and he would re-season using lard.

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 03-27-2014, 11:46 AM
#20
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Well seasoned cast iron cookware is hard to beat. Unsalted lard is the best to season with IMO. The flavor of foods cooked in cast iron ... mmm Yummmmmm! A small cast iron frypan also makes a great weapon! A few years back, an 81 year old local gal ran off a wannabe robber with one. OUCH!!!

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