05-06-2012, 12:27 PM
#1
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I learned this poem while in college, and it wasn't in English or Literature class. I was first exposed to this great classic while I pledged my fraternity. This poem has stuck with me & I find it relevant in many aspects of my life; spiritual, health, and now even my shaving ritual. I propose when doing things that the masses are doing in any regard and consistently reaping poor results that you consider the road less traveled by as it very well could make all the difference.

The Road Not Taken -- by Robert Frost Wrote:TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
 
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
 
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
 
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

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 05-06-2012, 12:54 PM
#2
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Every time I hear that poem, I think of Yogi Berra who when ask for directions to his home said, "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."

The explanation is provided in the following site and it provided below:
http://www.stevetheump.com/yogisms.htm
Most people are unaware of the origin of this quote. Living near Mr. Berra in NJ, I can vouch for this fact. To get to Yogi's house, which is up a small mountainous area in Montclair, one has to drive up the large hill until you come to a fork. Since the road ahead loops around in a circle, regardless of which way you go, you get to Yogi's house. Hence the quote "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."

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 05-06-2012, 01:35 PM
#3
  • slantman
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  • Leesburg, Florida
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My favorite Frost poem is Mending Wall.

"Good fences make good neighbors"

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 05-08-2012, 12:04 PM
#4
  • Songwind
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  • Burnsville, MN
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My favorite is still "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening," but this one is probably second.

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 05-14-2012, 05:39 PM
#5
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Robert Frost lived in Derry, NH while he taught at the local school.

His homestead is about a mile and a half from my house.

A few summers back they had to remove a large ancient diseased sugar maple from the property. Wood from the tree was sold to artisans who made keepsakes. The tree was special as it was the inspiration for "Tree Outside My Window". I purchased a very nice Christmas ornament made from this tree.

Then a few Frost scholars said that they were certain the tree referenced in the poem had been a birch. Oh well.
http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/opin...ow-505018/

The farm is a national historic site

http://robertfrostfarm.org/

Hmmm....The website still refers to the tree as the "Tree Outside My Window"

I like "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening"
"...I have promises to keep
And miles to go before I sleep"

A short ways down the road from the Frost farm is a wedding hall called Promises to Keep. Very fitting.

Phil

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 05-15-2012, 09:57 PM
#6
  • Songwind
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Eh, SBTWoaSE is about having too many obligations to kill yourself. Not the greatest thing to associate with your wedding. Wink

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 05-17-2012, 04:51 PM
#7
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(05-15-2012, 09:57 PM)Songwind Wrote: Eh, SBTWoaSE is about having too many obligations to kill yourself. Not the greatest thing to associate with your wedding. Wink

That seemed like an odd take on this poem. I just don't see it. So I looked it up. There are references to this dark interpretation of the poem.

But I still don't see it when I read the poem.

And I don't agree with it. Suicide is a selfish act. You care only about yourself and not how your actions will affect others.
Someone who "can't" kill themselves because they care about fulfilling there obligations to others is not suicidal.

Phil

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 05-19-2012, 08:03 PM
#8
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The beautiful thing about poetry, is that it takes on a life of its own. When the poet penned it, he may have had one thing in mind, but that does not necessarily remain for all readers. I try not to read a lot of critical analysis on poems, I take them for what they mean to me...

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 05-19-2012, 08:10 PM
#9
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(05-19-2012, 08:03 PM)Russianrat Wrote: The beautiful thing about poetry, is that it takes on a life of its own. When the poet penned it, he may have had one thing in mind, but that does not necessarily remain for all readers. I try not to read a lot of critical analysis on poems, I take them for what they mean to me...

Well said! I have the same thought on literature in general. I think it's an exercise in futility to analyze a work asking what the author meant. We'll never know the author's true intent unless he's come out & explained it somewhere. Just enjoy it and get out of it what you will today. In a year or two you may get something else completely different from it.

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 05-21-2012, 08:34 PM
#10
  • Songwind
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  • Burnsville, MN
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(05-17-2012, 04:51 PM)PhilNH5 Wrote: And I don't agree with it. Suicide is a selfish act. You care only about yourself and not how your actions will affect others.
Someone who "can't" kill themselves because they care about fulfilling there obligations to others is not suicidal.

Phil

Trust me on this, you're wrong.

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