04-07-2014, 10:46 AM
#1
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Well I have been wet shaving off and on for around 3 years, but for the last 4 months I have only been using DE razors....I really have been enjoying nice smooth shaves with very little to no irritation, but wanted to step into the world of straights....So I ordered a Custom from Robert Williams today, so now I just have to wait for a little bit to give it a try....LOL....Robert said about 9 months....So I was wondering what would be a good cheap razor to be learning on till then....I do use mild razors, as I have sensitive skin to keep from getting irritation. A few people have told me to stay away from shavettes....So any info would be greatly appreciated....Here is a photo of the Razor that I ordered from Robert.

[Image: vSvfSOu.jpg]

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 04-07-2014, 10:58 AM
#2
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Man I hope for you that you really like straight razor shaving otherwise it will be a $$$ experience Wink

If you want to try another razor I would go for a 7/8" so you can get accustomed to a big razor, any vintage will do as long as it's honed.

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 04-07-2014, 11:06 AM
#3
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(04-07-2014, 10:58 AM)Snuff Wrote: Man I hope for you that you really like straight razor shaving otherwise it will be a $$$ experience Wink

If you want to try another razor I would go for a 7/8" so you can get accustomed to a big razor, any vintage will do as long as it's honed.

Yea I thought about that also, but If it is a fail, I will just add it to my collection...But Robert said that if I was not sure on the size that I could let him know and he would be glad to do a 7/8 for me. So I am still thinking about it.

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 04-07-2014, 12:01 PM
#4
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Beautiful looking razor, not sure I would advise a first time straight user to choose such a razor though that toe and heel look quite severe even for the most experienced straight razor user.

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 04-07-2014, 12:14 PM
#5
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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Why not just try a 6/8 Dovo? 6/8 is often recommended because its the in between size and gives the user an idea if he'll like a smaller or larger razor.

Get it honed by a pro and a $60 strop and its time to shave.

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 04-07-2014, 12:17 PM
#6
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That is a nice looking razor, though (like others here) I'd have suggested something more modest to start out with.

Still, that could be a nice shaver, and it will retain its value if you decide that straight shaving is not for you.

My suggestion for something to start with would be to look for a nice vintage razor that's shave-ready in the 5/8" - 6/8" width range - preferably with a round point. You can get one from a reputable source like SRD, WhippedDog or from a forum member on the BST subforums.

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 04-07-2014, 12:34 PM
#7
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(04-07-2014, 12:17 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: That is a nice looking razor, though (like others here) I'd have suggested something more modest to start out with.

Still, that could be a nice shaver, and it will retain its value if you decide that straight shaving is not for you.

My suggestion for something to start with would be to look for a nice vintage razor that's shave-ready in the 5/8" - 6/8" width range - preferably with a round point. You can get one from a reputable source like SRD, WhippedDog or from a forum member on the BST subforums.

Yea, I am going to look at getting a vintage 6/8 and I have plenty of time to change what I am wanting with Robert, he said that it would be 9 months before I would get it and if I wanted to go with something different just let him know early on....I guess as many have said here already that might be to aggressive of a style for now......But I have 9 months to practice... Thanks for the help!

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 04-07-2014, 12:50 PM
#8
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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For sure that is a beautiful razor and you are stepping into the end with that one. I would have the same reservation about the heel and toe as Jamie has. Sharp corners on a straight demand respect, concentration and good technique or they can easily bite you.

For a beginner razor a new basic Dovo or other recognized brand razor with a round point on the toe in 5/8 to 6/8 size would be what I would suggest. Buy it from a reputable vendor who supplies it shave ready as factory edges tend not to be 100% there.

You will need a strop as a bare minimum to keep it going. I would say a 3 inch strop to avoid having to learn doing the X stroke while stropping. Don't go too fancy on the strop as you will likely nick it up learning to strop properly. If you nick a strop you have likely dulled your razor too or if you improperly strop you can turn an edge and dull the razor that way too. Because of that be prepared to send it out for professional honing more frequently in the beginning.

It takes a lot of time and patience to learn to shave properly with a straight. Not trying to dissuade you from doing it just go into it with your eyes open is all.

Bob

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 04-07-2014, 01:10 PM
#9
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(04-07-2014, 12:50 PM)BobH Wrote: For sure that is a beautiful razor and you are stepping into the end with that one. I would have the same reservation about the heel and toe as Jamie has. Sharp corners on a straight demand respect, concentration and good technique or they can easily bite you.

For a beginner razor a new basic Dovo or other recognized brand razor with a round point on the toe in 5/8 to 6/8 size would be what I would suggest. Buy it from a reputable vendor who supplies it shave ready as factory edges tend not to be 100% there.

You will need a strop as a bare minimum to keep it going. I would say a 3 inch strop to avoid having to learn doing the X stroke while stropping. Don't go too fancy on the strop as you will likely nick it up learning to strop properly. If you nick a strop you have likely dulled your razor too or if you improperly strop you can turn an edge and dull the razor that way too. Because of that be prepared to send it out for professional honing more frequently in the beginning.

It takes a lot of time and patience to learn to shave properly with a straight. Not trying to dissuade you from doing it just go into it with your eyes open is all.

Bob

Thanks for your comment, and I am going to start out with a vintage 6/8 and just take my time, but I think I am going to change my order and not get such an aggressive style razor.....and might even save me some $$$$$....Thanks again!

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 04-07-2014, 02:05 PM
#10
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(04-07-2014, 01:10 PM)wphelps Wrote:
(04-07-2014, 12:50 PM)BobH Wrote: For sure that is a beautiful razor and you are stepping into the end with that one. I would have the same reservation about the heel and toe as Jamie has. Sharp corners on a straight demand respect, concentration and good technique or they can easily bite you.

For a beginner razor a new basic Dovo or other recognized brand razor with a round point on the toe in 5/8 to 6/8 size would be what I would suggest. Buy it from a reputable vendor who supplies it shave ready as factory edges tend not to be 100% there.

You will need a strop as a bare minimum to keep it going. I would say a 3 inch strop to avoid having to learn doing the X stroke while stropping. Don't go too fancy on the strop as you will likely nick it up learning to strop properly. If you nick a strop you have likely dulled your razor too or if you improperly strop you can turn an edge and dull the razor that way too. Because of that be prepared to send it out for professional honing more frequently in the beginning.

It takes a lot of time and patience to learn to shave properly with a straight. Not trying to dissuade you from doing it just go into it with your eyes open is all.

Bob

Thanks for your comment, and I am going to start out with a vintage 6/8 and just take my time, but I think I am going to change my order and not get such an aggressive style razor.....and might even save me some $$$$$....Thanks again!

Nothing wrong with a vintage razor in good condition so long as you get it in shave ready condition which is critical. There are reputable vendors that supply then like that and are not the crap shoot buying from that well know other place by bidding.

Nothing wrong with an aggressive style razor either so long as you work your way up to it. With the appropriate skill level they are just fine. Have fun above all.

Bob

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 04-07-2014, 04:13 PM
#11
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Definitely get a beater razor or two. As a fellow noob to this, I can recommend it. Last thing you wanna do is mess up a pricy blade like that one.

Either pick one upfrom Larry at WhippedDog or do what I do and go antique shop/flea market hunting and learn how to clean them up and hone them.

Larry sells a poor man strop kit too. Buy that AND a backup strop...you're gonna need it. Then step up to a big boy strop from SRD or Star Shaving. Best of luck.

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 04-10-2014, 04:01 PM
#12
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I would encourage you to check out the Feather line-up. That's what I use. The traditional straights with the honing, etc. is an art unto itself. It's a lot of work. I almost went that route, but I came to my senses Biggrin

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 04-10-2014, 06:59 PM
#13
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The work is what makes it fun

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 04-10-2014, 07:02 PM
#14
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(04-10-2014, 06:59 PM)BudWhite Wrote: The work is what makes it fun

I agree.....Biggrin

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