04-15-2014, 07:13 AM
#1
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First off I want to apologize for the length of this post. I've been wet shaving with DE's for several years now and want to give straights a try. I've been reading through the threads on this forum and I'm thinking I should start with a 5/8 round possibly a Dovo,shave ready. I was particularly intrigued with a thread by Wingdo (featuring Obie) about a 7 day straight shave practice period. I'm still around five months away from purchasing but need alot of help. Ive looked at SRD and Whipped Dog but alot of items/sets are out of stock. Also,how often should a straight be honed? Whats type of strop should I get 2",3",or the boared type? Any comments and suggestions are desired.Undecided

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 04-15-2014, 04:06 PM
#2
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Not even one suggestion? Help me out here guys, I know very little about straight razor's at this point.

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 04-15-2014, 10:27 PM
#3
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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Hello Captain,

I'm a relative beginner myself. I hope it's OK to suggest the following link to a booklet that I found helpful, and will answer many of your questions.

http://www.shavemyface.com/downloads/The...-Shave.pdf

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 04-16-2014, 02:41 AM
#4
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
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Captain Caveman,

Welcome to the world of straight razor shaving — at least you're thinking about it. Here are some general thoughts.4/

1. Do as much reading on the subject as possible.
2. Watch as many videos as you can. Most straight razor shaving videos on You Tube are dreadful. The good ones, however, stand out. I'll gladly send you some links.
3. Get a 4/8, a 5/8 or 6/8 size blade, preferably round point. Anything bigger will be difficult to maneuver at first.
4. Make sure the razor is shave ready.
5. Depending on your beard mass and thickness, and frequency of shave, have your razor honed about every three or four months, or until the blade starts tugging. Do not hone the razor yourself right now. First concentrate on shaving skill and technique.
6. Oh, you also need a good strop, although it need not be expensive.
7. Your standard lathering should be fine.

Beyond that, I'll gladly mentor you, if you like.

Stay well and good luck,
Obie

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 04-16-2014, 03:23 AM
#5
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Thanks, I will keep all this in mind while I continue to learn more.

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 04-16-2014, 04:06 AM
#6
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Whipped dog is well liked and quick to respond. Email Larry, he is a very nice gentlemen.
If you want to purchase a brand new razor, SRD and Thesuperiorshave are well known for their service. I got my first Dovo from SRD. Good edge on that one.
I am not a fan of the Best Quality Dovo models because not the scales are flimsy.
At that price range, I'd go with a Ralph Aust (if in stock).
Instead though, every week there are a bunch of vintage blades offered on the BST forums here and on B&B and SRP, at much lower prices and in good if not great shave ready edge. Also, there is a hobbyist sub-forum at B&B where the well known honers offer pretty good deals on either shave ready Gold Dollar razors (which are popular lately) or nice vintage razors which are usually of very high quality.
Like Obie said, a 5/8-6/8, half hollow to full hollow ground, round point would serve you just fine.
Get a strop (Whipped dog's strops are fine).
Enjoy the ride.

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 04-21-2014, 03:23 AM
#7
  • jamesrobson5
  • Chubby Chaser... Big Brush is Best!
  • Sherwood Park AB Canada!
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(04-16-2014, 02:41 AM)Obie Wrote: Captain Caveman,

Welcome to the world of straight razor shaving — at least you're thinking about it. Here are some general thoughts.4/

1. Do as much reading on the subject as possible.
2. Watch as many videos as you can. Most straight razor shaving videos on You Tube are dreadful. The good ones, however, stand out. I'll gladly send you some links.
3. Get a 4/8, a 5/8 or 6/8 size blade, preferably round point. Anything bigger will be difficult to maneuver at first.
4. Make sure the razor is shave ready.
5. Depending on your beard mass and thickness, and frequency of shave, have your razor honed about every three or four months, or until the blade starts tugging. Do not hone the razor yourself right now. First concentrate on shaving skill and technique.
6. Oh, you also need a good strop, although it need not be expensive.
7. Your standard lathering should be fine.

Beyond that, I'll gladly mentor you, if you like.

Stay well and good luck,
Obie

+1
Great advice. I would just add to take it slow till you get the hang of it. It won't take long. Smile

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