04-15-2014, 05:43 PM
#1
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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I have chances or rather opportunities to purchase vintage shave soaps and vintage creams. I'm a little leery of them, especially the creams. How old is too old? I know the soaps last longer but I have no clue on either.

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 04-15-2014, 06:16 PM
#2
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Hard soap and shaving sticks are GOOD. I am currently using a 1930s palmolive sick and it GLIDES like no soap does today. The only reason I wouldn't use them is if the wrapper is in good condition and they have a nice aesthetic appeal. Otherwise USE it, I say Smile

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 04-15-2014, 06:29 PM
#3
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I have some Penhaligon's Lords creams in glass jars that are probably 20 or more years old, and they have dried out completely, but I'm able to use them as soaps or reconstitute them with distilled water, and they work just fine. I imagine the ability of a cream to last over time depends somewhat upon its initial quality.

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 04-16-2014, 12:26 AM
#4
  • Nero
  • Ban Groupthink from Earth
  • le montagne
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(04-15-2014, 06:29 PM)churchilllafemme Wrote: I have some Penhaligon's Lords creams in glass jars that are probably 20 or more years old, and they have dried out completely, but I'm able to use them as soaps or reconstitute them with distilled water, and they work just fine. I imagine the ability of a cream to last over time depends somewhat upon its initial quality.

And you can't wait to sell them? Biggrin

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 04-16-2014, 05:03 AM
#5
  • Elendil
  • Raggedy man, good night
  • The snow's back.
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The best soaps I have are 50-70 years old, so I say go for it! I am also a bit leery of old creams, especially if they've been opened, but a test lather or two should give you a good idea about whether they'll perform.

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 04-16-2014, 06:50 AM
#6
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There's a phenomenon called Dreaded Orange Spots, which are basically a sort of mold that can grow in soap. If your soaps don't have that, they're probably good. Sliminess and an odd smell would be other flags.

Aside from that, it should be fine. The soap salts themselves should be stable - it's the superfats, glycerin (sugary) and other non-soap ingredients that might turn.

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 04-16-2014, 06:47 PM
#7
  • Nero
  • Ban Groupthink from Earth
  • le montagne
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I've been keeping my extra creams in the refrigerator, so I hope that does the trick.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 10-18-2014, 12:53 AM
#8
  • dimitrof
  • Member
  • Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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You can try soaking a puck of vintage soap overnight to get it primed before test lathering. This is a method that works, I've been told.

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 10-18-2014, 03:25 AM
#9
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My experience buying vintage soaps has been mainly good and one bad.

My worst was a Yardley, It had a musty smell to it, even though it was unopened I tried allsorts of things to get rid of the smell but I couldn't, it went straight in the bin.

Old spice was very good and so was Safari by Ralph Lauren.
Another one I picked up called Dubarry is not bad either.

The best one of all though, is the original Figaro P160 block I have .

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